#1
So, I recently started getting interested in/learning the basics of jazz guitar and I'm wondering which one of my guitars would be best suited for that kind of music. I have a MiM strat with stock SSS pickups, and a Hamer SATQ XT series with two duncan designed humbuckers. also, should i use the neck or bridge pickup? thanks
Gear:
Guitars
ESP LTD M-1000 Deluxe w/ FR
Hamer XT-series SATQ
Fender Stratocaster
'75 Fender F-35 Acoustic
Amp
Vox VT15
Pedals
535Q Crybaby Wah
Last edited by ChecKxMaTe77 at Jul 22, 2009,
#2
Use the one you live more, most people would say the strat. As for what pup to use, you shouldn't restrict your self to a set pup. I always change pups when I play.
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#3
You want a PAF style humbucker in a darler sounding guitar. Use the neck position. If you want to be a real cat with that really jazzy tone then you'll need a hollowbody, but solid bodies will do for a decent jazz tone. Also, bigger strings typically help.

Generally speaking, strats are not great jazz guitars, though they certainly can be used. I'd advise using your humbucker equipped guitar.
#4
bigger as in higher gauge i assume? im using 10s right now, should i buy 11s or 12s next time i go to the music store?
Gear:
Guitars
ESP LTD M-1000 Deluxe w/ FR
Hamer XT-series SATQ
Fender Stratocaster
'75 Fender F-35 Acoustic
Amp
Vox VT15
Pedals
535Q Crybaby Wah
#5
Maybe not 12's, but yes, he means higher gauge.
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#6
Just use the neck pickup and roll up the bass on the amp. That should definitely get you in the ballpark.
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#7
Traditional jazz tone borders on a very minimal amplification of the tone produced by a hollowbody. Boring. Neck humbucker will give you the richness. Don't roll the tone off too far, or mud will result. If playing with a bassist, be mindful of stepping on the frequencies he will be accentuating. This means less bass boominess from you. Extreme high gauge strings are not necessary with your solid body.

The trick is to EQ properly. Jazz chords are big and fat. Play a few and make sure that each note within sounds clearly. EQ until chords sound good and you should be fine.

I play jazz through my Polytone SS amp and a 2x12 cabinet using my Lace Drop & Gain equipped Parker, using 10 gauge Rotosound Nexus strings. A bit of reverb, occasionally some chorus, and/or delay, a touch of compression and a full, rich modern sound comes out.

edit:

If playing through a tube amp, you may have issues keeping a clean sound. Larry Carlton sets his Dumble amp for a small amount of breakup if he digs in on single note work. This creates an issue with chords, which will break up more readily. He rolls off his guitar volume to achieve a clean tone when not digging in and uses a volume pedal to achieve the breakup only when he wants. Full volume pedal for the single note breakup if desired, then rolls back the pedal for chords or clean single note. The actual noticeable volume difference between breakup and clean is minimal with his setup.
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Last edited by Vulcan at Jul 23, 2009,
#8
Quote by Vulcan
Traditional jazz tone borders on a very minimal amplification of the tone produced by a hollowbody. Boring. Neck humbucker will give you the richness. Don't roll the tone off too far, or mud will result. If playing with a bassist, be mindful of stepping on the frequencies he will be accentuating. This means less bass boominess from you. Extreme high gauge strings are not necessary with your solid body.

The trick is to EQ properly. Jazz chords are big and fat. Play a few and make sure that each note within sounds clearly. EQ until chords sound good and you should be fine.

I play jazz through my Polytone SS amp and a 2x12 cabinet using my Lace Drop & Gain equipped Parker, using 10 gauge Rotosound Nexus strings. A bit of reverb, occasionally some chorus, and/or delay, a touch of compression and a full, rich modern sound comes out.

edit:

If playing through a tube amp, you may have issues keeping a clean sound. Larry Carlton sets his Dumble amp for a small amount of breakup if he digs in on single note work. This creates an issue with chords, which will break up more readily. He rolls off his guitar volume to achieve a clean tone when not digging in and uses a volume pedal to achieve the breakup only when he wants. Full volume pedal for the single note breakup if desired, then rolls back the pedal for chords or clean single note. The actual noticeable volume difference between breakup and clean is minimal with his setup.

thanks man
Gear:
Guitars
ESP LTD M-1000 Deluxe w/ FR
Hamer XT-series SATQ
Fender Stratocaster
'75 Fender F-35 Acoustic
Amp
Vox VT15
Pedals
535Q Crybaby Wah
#9
Quote by Vulcan
Traditional jazz tone borders on a very minimal amplification of the tone produced by a hollowbody. Boring. Neck humbucker will give you the richness. Don't roll the tone off too far, or mud will result. If playing with a bassist, be mindful of stepping on the frequencies he will be accentuating. This means less bass boominess from you. Extreme high gauge strings are not necessary with your solid body.

The trick is to EQ properly. Jazz chords are big and fat. Play a few and make sure that each note within sounds clearly. EQ until chords sound good and you should be fine.

I play jazz through my Polytone SS amp and a 2x12 cabinet using my Lace Drop & Gain equipped Parker, using 10 gauge Rotosound Nexus strings. A bit of reverb, occasionally some chorus, and/or delay, a touch of compression and a full, rich modern sound comes out.

edit:

If playing through a tube amp, you may have issues keeping a clean sound. Larry Carlton sets his Dumble amp for a small amount of breakup if he digs in on single note work. This creates an issue with chords, which will break up more readily. He rolls off his guitar volume to achieve a clean tone when not digging in and uses a volume pedal to achieve the breakup only when he wants. Full volume pedal for the single note breakup if desired, then rolls back the pedal for chords or clean single note. The actual noticeable volume difference between breakup and clean is minimal with his setup.

haha you know your stuff dude
i wish i knew more about all the gear and tones, i just know tons about theory and the actual playing lol

sometimes ill get a certain tone out of my amp and i cant decide if its the most amazing tone ever, or the crappiest.
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