#1
Hi

Does pick thickness make a difference to the sound a guitar will make or is it just personal preference?

I have just started playing acoustic and only using fingers so far but want to start using a pick.

Thanks
#2
Well, thin picks sound more fluttery, while thiker picks have a harder sound. And for acoustic, you'll want a thin pick, as they are better suited to strumming, which I assume you'll be doing, as you're playing acoustic.
#3
A thicker pick will have more bass in the sound, a harder attack, and will be generally louder.

3mm and above is generally used for gypsy jazz, where getting solo lines on an acoustic to sound as loud as possible is key.

1mm to 2mm is generally used for blues, rock and metal. Dunlop Jazz III picks have a pointed tip to give a smooth, positive contact with the strings that is great for lead playing.

Less than 1mm is used for acoustic strumming or particularly delicate electric playing. The thin pick allows you to bash away at an acoustic without the sound jumping out too much and sounding harsh.


However, you don't have to choose just pick or just fingerstyle: have a go at hybrid picking and thumbpicks.
#4
Quote by maXterbat0r
Well, thin picks sound more fluttery, while thiker picks have a harder sound. And for acoustic, you'll want a thin pick, as they are better suited to strumming, which I assume you'll be doing, as you're playing acoustic.



Not exactly true; who say's acoustics are mostly strumming?

And TS, it's all about preference, but as maX said, thin ones are better for strumming chords and such. Buy a couple, all difference sizes, and you'll see what you're into.
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#5
Inexpensive picks are about $3 for a dozen. Relatively expensive picks are about $1.5 each.

$10 will buy you a bunch of nearly every size; They're cheap, just go buy a bunch and test them out. They all sound different, even to terribad ears like mine.
#6
I'm a metal player and my pick preference is dunlop heavy picks. If you want to cut through the strings more quickly and get a cleaner sound when alternate picking, then you will want heavier picks. Other than that, it's up to you.
#7
I use dunlop tortex. I use .50's, .60's, .73's and .80's.

The 50's i use for strumming where i want a trebley sound. These are too flexible for picking really. 60's i use for strumming with more attack. 73's i use if i'm playing a song that requires strumming and lead work, and the 80's i use for playing metal and blues with because they're pretty rigid and give a fantastic full tone.
#8
Thicker picks are more versatile, you can get a strong attack and heavy strumming with them, or hold them a bit more loosely and get a lighter sound.

Thin picks can't really do heavy or hard picked music, but make strumming chords sound a bit better.
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#9
Some of these answers are completly wrong. A thicker pick will give you a more bass, lower sound. Thinker pick will give you a brighter sound. Like when I play metal I use .60 which give me a nice bright sound.

Try this.

Take a thin pick and a thicker pick and play some notes and you will see the diffrence.
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#10
Quote by Ninjake


Thin picks can't really do heavy or hard picked music, but make strumming chords sound a bit better.


Not true at all, I know of two sick local death metal bands in which the guitarist uses very thin picks, it's all up to preference. It's not only the pick that does a sound difference, it's also how you pick and everything.