#1
I’m having the hardest time when it comes to soloing. I know scales and licks but when I try to combine them I sound like a robot, feel uncomfortable doing the solo and want to get out of it as soon as possible. I’m not a genius to tell that If I want to get serious about my guitar playing, this is a huge issue.

My economy right now is in alert so I can’t spend much money on a teacher, but I want to learn step by step all in the same source. I’ve had some experiences with the web and I end up messing it up because of this thing about the different sources.

So, what do you recommend me to do?
#2
Are you having issues writing your own solos or covering other bands solos?
#4
Quote by srob7001
Are you having issues writing your own solos or covering other bands solos?


That would be nice to know but for now try listening to jazz or blues. And as far as theory goes keep it simple at first, I learned from playing jazz trombone that if you try to hard you fail.
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#5
You mean improv? You don't really need a teacher for simple pentatonic improvisation. Just gotta hear it in your head and play whatever you hear. Gotta extensively know the scales though. Practice with backing tracks.
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#6
The blues. the holy grail of feeling. Get some blues jamtracks, and play how u feel. It's a start, then you can move on to more complex things from there.
#7
First of all, it’s great that you can open up like this and talk about your weak areas in your playing. The criticism well applied is one of the things that is going to make you stronger. Second, there are tons of resources, but it’s fair what you say: the lack of a “plan” can bring your playing down seriously. One of my students took this dvd from this site and I borrowed it, http://www.easymusiclessons.com/guitar-lessons/how-to-play-electric-guitar.html
The lessons have a great approach to soloing and it’s done in a very musical context. It’s easy to understand and the topics covered are the “must know” of any aspiring guitarist. I suggest you to give it a try, it’s not expensive, so you won’t be throwing your money away, I guarantee you.
#8
Easiest way of doing this:
Find a jamtrack like KoenDercksen suggested. Play the chord progression or rhythm section. Once you get a feel for it, start hitting chord tones on either each beat, the 1st and 3rd beat, or 2nd and 4th. From there, start harmonizing you're leads with the rhythm with whatever intervals you want to use (given that you stay in key). Go ahead and modulate as well.
The basis of soloing is mixing and matching these elements and making them interesting. Phrasing is also very important.
I find that when I start playing chromatic and atonal wank, phrasing always makes it sound somewhat decent.

As you can see, there really is no easy way of doing this. You can try to streamline all of this info, but you might come out with some generic solos.
If you are truely a muscian (and a gentleman and a scholar), you will never be 100% satisfied with your work, but you can get close. Use the tools at you're disposal to acheive that.
#9
i'm in the same boat right now. you really just have to keep playing around with it. the more i just try to jam out to back tracks and not worry so much about what scale i'm using the better i get. it's still taking a while to get my improv to where i want it but just by sticking with it i'm seeing progress. just keep trying, man.
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#10
Quote by ibanez87
The blues. the holy grail of feeling. Get some blues jamtracks, and play how u feel. It's a start, then you can move on to more complex things from there.


This as well.
I find that creating complex blues-styled solos sound the best.
I still don't a full grasp of (avant) jazz, a la Holdsworth, Montegomery, and Coltrane (though he wasn't a guitarist, he's still badass).
#11
Recycled stock seagull answer

Quote by steven seagull
This has nothing to do with scales, or modes, or techniques...this is about YOU. If you want to make interesting music then you have to start thinking in sounds, not just in terms of "guitar stuff I know". Saying to yourself, for example, "This is in C so I can play the C major scale or C major arpeggios" is going to sound boring because you're not really playing music, you're just stringing together a bunch of familiar patterns.

You need to start thinking, listening and understanding more. A scale isn't a pattern for you to play, it has a pattern but that's just how it appears on the guitar. It's a set of sounds, notes separated by intervals and you need to drill yourself on how it sounds and how those notes relate to each other because that's what's crucial, not the shape - the shape is incidental and simply a quirk of the guitar, you don't need a guitar to make music or play a scale. You don't even need an instrument. That scale is your aural reference, a framework of sounds that are safe to work with over a certain backing, with handy names and functions assigned to each note to help things even more. It's a head's up for you, a way to help you know how certain notes are going to sound before you play them, And by association, if you know what the notes of the scale are going to sound like you can know what the notes outside the scale will sound like too. They aren't part of the scale itself because they don't sound as nice but they're no less useable, you just have to know how to make their sound work in the context of the scale so that often means using them as passing tones, either as passing tones or bends for example.

If you can't make music without a guitar then you'll never be able to make it with one. By that I mean you need to be able to draw on whatever musical knowledge and experience you have to enable you to create someting of your own. If you can create something in your head then you should be able to hum or sing it, and that's a damnsight easier then playing it on the guitar. Why? Because you know how to "play" any note you want with your voice, you've got complete control of it as well as knowing exactly what to do to get te sound you want.

You simply don't have that level of mastery over the guitar yet so you can't just go straight to it. Listen to your backing and compose ideas in your head, then sing them back to yourself and listen to how they sound, and only after that figure out how to play them on the guitar. The more you do that the stronger you'll make the connections between what you hear in your head, the sounds that you finally make and whatever it is you physically had to do to make those sounds.

Remember the thing that matters most when playing the guitar is the note you're about to play
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#12
The more you do it the easier it gets - practice lots by yourself, where it doesn't matter if you mess up. Its a lot easier with a jam track, and it helps to record yourself - that way you can pick out the bits you like and reuse them, and you can see your progress.

Try limiting yourself to just 3 or 4 notes from the scale (the root and a couple of notes near it) and improv with them - that way you can focus on your rhythm and phrasing, and not have to worry about what note to play next. Once you're comfortable start adding more notes in until you are comfortable all over the neck

Learn a bunch of solos too, and adapt your favourite bits to use in your own playing.
#13
Quote by DrawnChris
First of all, it’s great that you can open up like this and talk about your weak areas in your playing. The criticism well applied is one of the things that is going to make you stronger. Second, there are tons of resources, but it’s fair what you say: the lack of a “plan” can bring your playing down seriously. One of my students took this dvd from this site and I borrowed it, http://www.easymusiclessons.com/guitar-lessons/how-to-play-electric-guitar.html
The lessons have a great approach to soloing and it’s done in a very musical context. It’s easy to understand and the topics covered are the “must know” of any aspiring guitarist. I suggest you to give it a try, it’s not expensive, so you won’t be throwing your money away, I guarantee you.


Hey man!!! Thank you very much for your advice, I think that this is what I was looking for. Great DVD, I feel like new with this fresh approach and it’s already working out for me. Again, thanks, great resource! I'll get back to you with more detailed description of what it seemed
#14
i have a problem kinda like this one.... I've been playing for a couple of years now, but i really never focus on soloing before, I was playing rhythm guitar only, and now that i want to start with the soloing stuff... i got stuck! my left hand fingers responds kinda well but it is the alternate picking that's giving me a hard time, i already started practicing with cromatics a couple of days ago and it seems to be working, but i would like to know if you guys can suggest me some other exercises to build up some more speed in my fingers and improve my alternate pick... any suggestions are welcomed

btw, i have been working with some of the lessons posted here at UG and they are really helpful, but I'll like to know what other advice can you give me as more experimented players
#15
Try some covers from other bands
listen to the solo non stop get it jammed in your head then learn it, ive just overcome this problem
as for improvising try to have a backing track playing then just go with the flow, but dont just run the scales, skip strings, add vibrato, add some bends etc..
good luck
#17
Also, bear in mind you don't have to learn to solo. Hugely overrated. If you can put down a solid groove, read a chord sheet and play the odd melody you're ****ing sorted.

Quote by JameelGuitar
Hey man!!! Thank you very much for your advice, I think that this is what I was looking for. Great DVD, I feel like new with this fresh approach and it’s already working out for me. Again, thanks, great resource! I'll get back to you with more detailed description of what it seemed


It's almost as though he was cut off mid sen