#1
I heard it's because maple necks are "brighter" and pronounce fret buzz, but I find that hard to believe since the strings don't touch the wood...they touch the frets?
#3
Yeah the woods do make a difference. I recently heard from a representative at Suhr guitars who talked a while about the different types of wood. He said that tone from the wood is distributed like this. 50-50 between the body and the neck. The fretboard is 50% of the neck while the back of the neck is the other 50%. As for the body 15% is the top and 85% is the back and sides. So wood types do make a difference. Of course that is just the different woods broken down not the electronics.
Originally posted by arrrgg
When my grandpa comes over to visit, after his shower, he walks around naked to dry off
#5
Quote by Led man32
Yeah the woods do make a difference. I recently heard from a representative at Suhr guitars who talked a while about the different types of wood. He said that tone from the wood is distributed like this. 50-50 between the body and the neck. The fretboard is 50% of the neck while the back of the neck is the other 50%. As for the body 15% is the top and 85% is the back and sides. So wood types do make a difference. Of course that is just the different woods broken down not the electronics.

Was he talking about electric guitars? I'm not an expert really, but those figures sound a little off from what my estimates would be.

But yes the different types of wood do affect tone. And not all acoustics have rosewood fretboards. Most higher end acoustics actually have Ebony fretboards.
#6
I played an acoustic with an ebony fretboard in a shop one time...i tell ya what it was the sweetest sounding thing ever. Price tag to make you cry, but i bet it was worth it. Rosewoods just more common I guess, and i thought that fret buzz was more pronounced on that than maple. Going by what i hear on my electrics
#7
Quote by jimtaka
Was he talking about electric guitars? I'm not an expert really, but those figures sound a little off from what my estimates would be.

But yes the different types of wood do affect tone. And not all acoustics have rosewood fretboards. Most higher end acoustics actually have Ebony fretboards.



Yes he was talking about electric guitars. He was the Suhr representative traveling with Guthrie Govan on his clinic tour. He definitely seemed like a reliable source.
Originally posted by arrrgg
When my grandpa comes over to visit, after his shower, he walks around naked to dry off
#8
It's different for acoustic guitars. I don't quite remember, but I think the reason was because the fretboard on acoustic guitars wear out quicker than electric guitars. Maple has to have a certain coating of gloss or something in order to be used. If not, the oils from your fingers would discolour the maple.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
I think the main reasons maple isn't used are that it looks pretty goofy and is really "snappy" sounding. The small handful of maple acoustic fretboards I have seen have all looked pretty cheesy. There are alternatives though, if you aren't into rosewood. Ebony is common, and Koa and Cherry are used too.

Edit: Rereading the first post, I see TS said maple necks. Those are fairly common, though not nearly on the scale of Mahogany.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Jul 23, 2009,
#10
He said neck in the post, but fretboard in the title. Maple is more common in cheaper guitars from what I've seen. Nothing wrong with a maple neck though.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#13
Quote by Led man32
Yes he was talking about electric guitars. He was the Suhr representative traveling with Guthrie Govan on his clinic tour. He definitely seemed like a reliable source.

I wasn't really clear. I didn't mean to imply that he wasn't a reliable source. What I meant was that I suspected that he was talking about electric guitars because my own beliefs on the importance and effects of different parts of an acoustic guitar would be different than the ones you posted. They sounded about right for an electric guitar, though. That's why I figured the information pertained to electric guitars.

Quote by obeythepenguin
Personally I think the one piece maple neck is the only kind for Fender electrics (their rosewood boards look cheap and feel rather sticky to me), but the reverse is also true.

Really? I actually find the opposite to be true. I think that the maple fretboards feel sticky or tacky to me.

Quote by David Collins
Myself as well as many others consider most rosewoods superior tonally and functionally.

What are the reasons why you find Rosewood superior tonally and functionally for fretboards compared with Ebony?
#14
Quote by David Collins
*wall of amazingly useful text*


I read it all. Thanks for the awesome info!
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#15
^ it's great to have an experienced luthier hanging around with us -- we should have an "ask David" thread.