#1
Say while writing four part harmony in 4/4, with two chords per measure, the first chord is C major, with a C in the soprano. The second chord is a G major with a B in the soprano. If I wanted to write a changing tone in the soprano, how would I notate that rhythmically? I know a changing tone is two NCT's, in which the first steps up from the first chord tone, then skips down to another non chord tone, then steps up to resolve to the second chord. So say I wanted to step up from the first chord to the D, skip down to an A, then step up to the B. Would the proper notation be a quarter note for the C in the first chord, an eighth for the D, an eighth for the A, and a whole for the B in the second chord? I realize I didn't write that too well, but its hard to convey this question.

Also is this called a Cambiata? I've heard it referred to as that, but in theory class it was always called a Changing tone, or double neighboring tones.
#2
i would guess all the soprano notes would be quarter notes and everything else would be half notes.
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#3
Are you trying to write all of this on the same staff? If so, why?

Edit: It would be very helpful if you could write your piece and post a picture. Even if your notation is wrong (but it must make sense to some extent), someone should be able to answer your question.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jul 23, 2009,
#4
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Are you trying to write all of this on the same staff? If so, why?

Edit: It would be very helpful if you could write your piece and post a picture. Even if your notation is wrong (but it must make sense to some extent), someone should be able to answer your question.


Its four part voice leading...its one of the things you learn in entry level Music Theory at college. You write on a grand staff to voice your chords, with the soprano and alto on the treble cleffed staff, and the tenor and bass on the bass cleffed staff.

And yes, I'll try to upload a picture.