#1
I have understood that a pentatonic scale is something like this:

e|-0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12-|
B|-0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12-|
G|-0-2-4-5-7-9-10-12-|
D|-0-2-4-5-7-9-10-12-|
A|-0-2-4-5-7-9-10-12-|
E|-0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12-|


But I'm getting pretty confused after seeing such things as this:



So can someone please explain this last image to me. Although I know there are lots of lessons about scales (esp. pentatonic scales), these patterns don't help me much because I'm not sure if I really get what they mean.

I'm not a complete beginner by the way, I just don't know much about music theory. If anybody explained these patterns to me, it would probably be easier for me to learn some other scales than the pentatonic, which is starting to bore me...

Thanks,
ahsoo
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#2
There's 5 different notes in a pentatonic scale (hence, penta-) and those 5 patterns are the same scale, starting from a different note. Much like modes in relation to the major (Ionian) scale.

Edit: What you put originally isn't the pentatonic, it's the minor scale.
Last edited by Silvertooth at Jul 24, 2009,
#3
The pentatonic scale is made up of 5 notes. You can play the scale anywhere on the neck that you can find those notes.

If you were to get a picture of a fretboard and draw on it every occurance of every note in a pentatonic scale, it makes a pattern.

Break that pattern up into 2nps sections and you get your picture. The red dots are the minor pentatonic root notes.

They don't put fret numbers on the pics because where you play it will vary depending on what key your in - what your root note is.

If you want to understand scales, start with the major scale. Its the simplest, and you can derive pretty much all your other scales from it. For example the major pentatonic is just the major scale with 2 notes omitted. Check out the music theory FAQ sticky
#5
these patterns are penetonics
idk where u get yours but i think those are just normal do-rae-me scales
for example pattern 5 (dont pay attention to colors, but i think thats where the beat should be on a metronome [dont quoteme])
we will play it on the 3th fret its just like tabs but its not ttelling oyu where to play, like
e|3-5
b|3-5
g|2-5
d|2-5
a|3-5
e|3-5 i ahve a sheet my music teacher gave me that has all these scales and stuf if you want a copy, i can take a pic and email it to you
#6
okay, your first example is definitely not a pentatonic scale... it's just notes written out on various frets.

the pentatonic scale is made up of five notes, and there is no set pattern for it. It's wherever those five notes occur anywhere on the fretboard. To derive the scale, you choose your root (or key), then follow the formula to build the scale. The formula for a minor pentatonic scale is:

root - minor third - fourth - fifth - minor seventh - octave (same as root, just higher)

if you do not understand what the words in that formula mean, then you should click the link in my sig, and learn about intervals, because scales will never have any meaning to you in terms of theory if you don't understand intervals.
#7
Quote by zhilla
The pentatonic scale is made up of 5 notes. You can play the scale anywhere on the neck that you can find those notes.

If you were to get a picture of a fretboard and draw on it every occurance of every note in a pentatonic scale, it makes a pattern.

Break that pattern up into 2nps sections and you get your picture. The red dots are the minor pentatonic root notes.

They don't put fret numbers on the pics because where you play it will vary depending on what key your in - what your root note is.

If you want to understand scales, start with the major scale. Its the simplest, and you can derive pretty much all your other scales from it. For example the major pentatonic is just the major scale with 2 notes omitted. Check out the music theory FAQ sticky



Zhilla knows all!!!
#8
The pic are what you'd imagine looking down onto the neck of you guitar. Bottom line is the low E string. Pattern 5 as an example, the first dot if you imagine is the 3rd fret on the E string (which is a G btw) the next dot is the 5th fret (A btw).

Next string up is the 2nd fret (B) and 5th (D)

Was that the answer to your question. Maybe I didn't understand the question.
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#9
Short answer, learn the notes the scale contains and compare that with the patterns - the pentatonic scale only actually contains 5 notes, they just repeat a lot.
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#10
Ts what you've written out is the natural minor scale on each string using the open string as the root for the new scale. On the low e string you've written out the E natural minor scale horizontally along the same string. The patterns you are confuzed about are just taking the same series of notes but instead of playing them all on the one string horizontally they are played vertically across multiple strings.
#11
If you look at pattern 1, the bottom string has the dots 2 frets apart... Now go down to pattern 2... On the bottom string, the first dot is actually the second dot that was on the bottom string in pattern 1.

An example... Let's say that this pentatonic scale is in A minor. The bottom string in pattern 1 is the low E string. The first dot would be the 5th fret (A) and the second dot is the 8th fret (C). Now if you move to pattern 2, the first dot is the 8th fret (C) and the second dot is the 10th fret (D). And so on, so forth. Get it?