#1
Ok, so I've been thinking a lot about strange time signatures and I've trying to figure out how or why someone would use a number on the bottom that isn't a power of 2 and this is what I came up with:

Let's say you have a 5:4 polyrhythm going against the drums and the guitar and so you write the guitar part in normal 4/4 time. But then couldn't you write the drum part in 5/5 time so that there were five "fifth notes" going against the guitar's quarter notes (I guess they would be called fifth notes and quintuplets because it's not in 4/4 anymore and so wouldn't really be a tuplet).

Then I was thinking what if you made the 5/5 part 7/5? Then you'd have a polyrhythm polymeter of seven quintuplets against four quarternotes.


Is my thinking correct?
Last edited by The Horror! at Jul 24, 2009,
#2


Let's say you have a 5:4 polyrhythm going against the drums and the guitar and so you write the guitar part in normal 4/4 time. But then couldn't you write the drum part in 5/5 time so that there were five "fifth notes" going against the guitar's quarter notes (I guess they would be called fifth notes and quintuplets because it's not in 4/4 anymore and so wouldn't really be a tuplet).


You write the drums in 4/4. They are playing quintuplets, which fit into 4/4 by their definition.


Then I was thinking what if you made the 5/5 part 7/5? Then you'd have a polyrhythm polymeter of seven quintuplets against four quarternotes.

I see where your going with this, and i took the liberty of attempting to create it in GP.

what I ended up with was one voice playing straight crotchets against another voice playing quintuplet crotchets, but playing a pattern of 7 notes that repeated.

It takes 7 bars for the quintuplet "7" grouping to shift back to starting on the first beat of a bar.

Your thinking is right, its just the way you worded it.
#3
But then couldn't you write the drum part in 5/5 time so that there were five "fifth notes" going against the guitar's quarter notes


Yes. It's not unheard off to do so either, though it's rare outside of more modernist music.
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#4
Quote by Archeo Avis
Yes. It's not unheard off to do so either, though it's rare outside of more modernist music.


But you have to remember, that would be polyMETER, not polyRHYTHM. I'd think it would be a whole lot easier to just notate it as quntuplet quarter notes over quarter notes in 4/4 time, wouldn't it?
#5
Quote by timeconsumer09
But you have to remember, that would be polyMETER, not polyRHYTHM. I'd think it would be a whole lot easier to just notate it as quntuplet quarter notes over quarter notes in 4/4 time, wouldn't it?


From what I understand (and I may be wrong), he's talking about notating a drum track playing a 5:4 rhythm against a guitar track playing straight quarter notes, which would indeed be a polyrhythm. If that's the case, you're right that notating it as quintuplet quarter notes would be far easier and more legible than having the drums alone modulate to 5/5 time for a single measure.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
*brain explodes*

I can't understand anything past 4:4 and 3:4...
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#10
Quote by RayToroIsAGod
*brain explodes*

I can't understand anything past 4:4 and 3:4...


You mean 4/4 and 3/4. The colon denotes a tuplet.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.