#1
ok i really want to learn what they are and how to use them, i sometimes see them pop up in a topic here and there, like "this song is in the key of D" i've played piano for 7 years and in spanish the key was the symbol at the begginig fo a scor (the treble cleff or the bass cleff) and besides them was a sharp or flat symbol on the lines correspondent to the notes signaling that instead of playing a natural note u would play that on einstead, whihc was followed with the time signature, but i doubt thats the key, so im thinking key has something to do to where the guitar is tuned (like d instead of d) but any clear explanations would be very welcome
Gear:
Morpheus Droptune
Ibanez Weeping Demon
Bugera 333xl 212
SCHECTER JEFF LOOMIS C7 FR
#2
italian. fail. The key just tells you which scale to use. It lets you know which notes to use. E.g if a piece is in Cmajor notes from Gminor won't sound right in it. Dude how can you play piano for that long and not know that?
Last edited by matt_0_5 at Jul 24, 2009,
#3
I'm sure there are plenty of lessons here on UG that can teach you about keys.

But for starters: Yes, the key signature at the beginning of piano music tells the key. For example, no sharps or flats is C major or A minor depending on how the song resolves (which is a whole other matter), 1 sharp is G major or E minor, 2 sharps is D major or B minor, etc.
Check out the circle of fifths.
It will help explain which key signatures go with which keys. The outer ring is major keys and the inner ring is minor keys.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jul 24, 2009,
#4
Quote by food1010
I'm sure there are plenty of lessons here on UG that can teach you about keys.

But for starters: Yes, the key signature at the beginning of piano music tells the key. For example, no sharps or flats is C major or A minor depending on how the song resolves (which is a whole other matter), 1 sharp is G major or E minor, 2 sharps is D major or B minor, etc.
Check out the circle of fifths.
It will help explain which key signatures go with which keys.


This guy said it better.
#5
The key is actually shown on sheet music next to the clef generally at the start of the song like you said you saw it in piano. The sharps or flats are carried throughout the song (as long as it maintains the same key). The key depends on which sharps or flats are there.. for example in the key of C there will be no sharps or flats, in the key of G there will be an F#.. it's different for every key and there's a method to determining them - you should look it up in the lessons for further explanation.
#6
This chart may help you out..





^ all scales/keys harmonized in triads. You can learn key signatures, what chords (triads in this case) are in a particular key.

The circle of 5ths is obviously good for learning key sigs as well.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 24, 2009,
#7
Quote by matt_0_5
italian. fail. The key just tells you which scale to use. It lets you know which notes to use. E.g if a piece is in Cmajor notes from Gminor won't sound right in it. Dude how can you play piano for that long and not know that?



apparently i did, just didnt know the names, and i know it for piano. problem is im trying to apply it for guitar, which im self thought and barely know any theory for guitar


and how would u apply say... on a band?
Gear:
Morpheus Droptune
Ibanez Weeping Demon
Bugera 333xl 212
SCHECTER JEFF LOOMIS C7 FR
Last edited by devit at Jul 24, 2009,
#8
Quote by devit
apparently i did, just didnt know the names, and i know it for piano. problem is im trying to apply it for guitar, which im self thought and barely know any theory for guitar
Try learning the notes on the fretboard. This may help.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
This chart may help you out..





^ all scales/keys harmonized in triads. You can learn key signatures, what chords (triads in this case) are in a particular key.

The circle of 5ths is obviously good for learning key sigs as well.



so using that key ur limited to only use the notes in those triads?
Gear:
Morpheus Droptune
Ibanez Weeping Demon
Bugera 333xl 212
SCHECTER JEFF LOOMIS C7 FR
#10
^ well it's not a matter of being limited. You can always change keys, or use borrowed chords.

but yeah, those are the chords in those keys. Keep in mind that's the chart for triads. I haven't made one for 7th chords or upper extensions yet. Triads is the place to start though.
shred is gaudy music
#11
^by borrowed chords u mean like accidentals? atleast thats how we call them in spanish
Gear:
Morpheus Droptune
Ibanez Weeping Demon
Bugera 333xl 212
SCHECTER JEFF LOOMIS C7 FR
#12
Quote by devit
^by borrowed chords u mean like accidentals? atleast thats how we call them in spanish


well borrowed chords are a chord from a different key, generally the parallel key.

For instance in C Major, if you used an F minor chord, it would be seen as borrowing from the parallel minor (F minor is the iv chord in C minor)

At 1st I would "limit" yourself to the chords as they naturally occur in a key. (as in that chart). Learn some music and experience chord progressions/keys in context. Once you are comfortable with that, then allow yourself to expand using that as the foundation.

Try to learn some stock chord progressions and apply them to various keys.

Example: iii VI ii V I

in C: Em - Am - Dm - G - C

in G: Bm - Em - Am - D - G


ect....


Do this alot. Learn to recognize these progressions in actual songs (context).
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 24, 2009,