#1
ok so the other day a friend showed me how to play a high open E. A string 7 fret G and D strings 9th fret so I guess in tab form in would be like this

0
7
9
9
0
0

but what chord is it when you remover you index finger like

0
0
9
9
0
0
what chord is that? also what are some other open chord that you can play higher on the neck like these?
#2
the first one is an E5 chord. the only notes are E and B.
the second one is E5add11.
and your diagrams are upside down
dont take any guff from these bastards man

Quote by Fenderhippie69
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#4
I prefer to call the first one the Pinball Wizard chord, just take out the open strings.
#6
Quote by KillahSquirrel
First one is just an E5, second one's an Esus4.


Correct-o. Assuming his diagrams were upside down like he described.
#7
Killer Squirrel is correct. (diagrams are indeed upside down)

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#8
are you sure there both e chords? here is the dia. again i think this is right

0
0
9
9
7
0

0
0
9
9
0
0

Im doing it like this
e
b
g
d
a
e
#9
Quote by GuitarKick
are you sure there both e chords? here is the dia. again i think this is right

0
0
9
9
7
0

0
0
9
9
0
0

Im doing it like this
e
b
g
d
a
e


Yes, that's correct now.
#10
Quote by GuitarKick
are you sure there both e chords?


Yeah, the first has E E B E B E, no 3rd (G or G#) so E5.
The second has E A B E B E, no 3rd but 4th (A) so Esus4
#11
these chords would be prime examples of the "modal" sound that this board seems so obsessed with...move those forms up & down the neck in minor 3rds ( try all intervals when you get what this stuff can do) and you will hear Indian ragas, middle ages themes, English/Irish ballad root sounds and many others..even a tad of Hendrix if you listen real hard..

now the trick here is not to be concerned with what the chord names are at each position...you can do that if you want but you will see at some point it doesn't really matter...just enjoy the freedom these kind of "open" string sounds bring...as for key tonality if you must...E minor and A minor work just fine...but remember modes are not keys...so don't even try to understand how this works if it confuses you now...just enjoy it..

try many different rhythms with this stuff...solo over it using octaves runs to further enhance the modal effect...then when you feel the open space of it try scale runs, arpeggios, your fave licks etc over it...use many chord runs ...B7 Eb7 etc...you will find they all work with enough practice and comfort in this style...

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Jul 26, 2009,
#12
Quote by wolflen
these chords would be prime examples of the "modal" sound that this board seems so obsessed with...move those forms up & down the neck in minor 3rds ( try all intervals when you get what this stuff can do) and you will hear Indian ragas, middle ages themes, English/Irish ballad root sounds and many others..even a tad of Hendrix if you listen real hard..

now the trick here is not to be concerned with what the chord names are at each position...you can do that if you want but you will see at some point it doesn't really matter...just enjoy the freedom these kind of "open" string sounds bring...as for key tonality if you must...E minor and A minor work just fine...but remember modes are not keys...so don't even try to understand how this works if it confuses you now...just enjoy it..

try many different rhythms with this stuff...solo over it using octaves runs to further enhance the modal effect...then when you feel the open space of it try scale runs, arpeggios, your fave licks etc over it...use many chord runs ...B7 Eb7 etc...you will find they all work with enough practice and comfort in this style...

play well

wolf


? these two chords have nothing at all to do with modes.
#13
Quote by wolflen
these chords would be prime examples of the "modal" sound that this board seems so obsessed with...move those forms up & down the neck in minor 3rds ( try all intervals when you get what this stuff can do) and you will hear Indian ragas, middle ages themes, English/Irish ballad root sounds and many others..even a tad of Hendrix if you listen real hard..

now the trick here is not to be concerned with what the chord names are at each position...you can do that if you want but you will see at some point it doesn't really matter...just enjoy the freedom these kind of "open" string sounds bring...as for key tonality if you must...E minor and A minor work just fine...but remember modes are not keys...so don't even try to understand how this works if it confuses you now...just enjoy it..

try many different rhythms with this stuff...solo over it using octaves runs to further enhance the modal effect...then when you feel the open space of it try scale runs, arpeggios, your fave licks etc over it...use many chord runs ...B7 Eb7 etc...you will find they all work with enough practice and comfort in this style...

play well

wolf

I don't want to sound like a jerk, but I think that you have no idea what you are talking about and are only going to confuse people with your claims. I also can't see the relevance of much of your post concerning the naming of TS's chords. Please elaborate.

Back on track, here's an Esus2:
e--0
B--0
G--11
D--14
A--14
E--0