#1
Hey. I'm around the grade 6 level (rgt). I can play barre chords, pick pretty quickly, know my theory, arpeggios etc.

But it's been that long since i've had to play open chords i've discovered an annoying problem with it.

Say i play an open Em chord and then go to a D chord, i find it very hard to mute the E+A strings if i'm playing a really quick progression. Any tips people? It's embarassing to be able to blast a Satch or Gilbert song but not to be able to make Oasis or Foo Fighters sound good!
#2
try not strumming the chords fast, but pick the individual chords, I always give my students this advice because if gives you a good feel of where the first string of the chord is..
#3
I don't think you understand my question; let me rephrase.

If i strum from Em to D, in a quick chord progression i cannot get the low E and A strings to stop ringing, so when i strike the D chord i can still hear these strings, which makes it sound muddy and incorrect. Just wanted a few tips to stop this happening when i play chords faster.
#4
Well, just don't strum the E and A.... and if you're still getting buzz (which you shouldn't) Then use either your thumb on your fretting hand, or your palm on your picking hand.
#5
Quote by fngrstylgtr
Well, just don't strum the E and A.... and if you're still getting buzz (which you shouldn't) Then use either your thumb on your fretting hand, or your palm on your picking hand.


Hang on, you don't understand my question either. Think rhythm playing the speed of Pinball Wizard or Inbetween Days by The Cure....it's going to be hard to mute with my picking hand cause it'll be strumming real fast, and my hands aren't big enough to play a D whilst muting the bass strings with my thumb.
#7
Well, that's unfortunate.... the only other way I can think is to learn to fret the D chord with middle, ring and pinky finger then bar your index across all 6 strings above the chord to mute it. Other than that, and the two I recommended, you're outta luck
#9
i use my right hand while strumming, while changing i could hit all open strings or mute so i dont need to let those squeeks happen or muddyness.
"Been Dazed And Confused For So0 LoNg ItZ n0T Tru3"

Fender LoneStar Strat.
Peavy VYPYR.
#10
Well I encourage you to continue trying to mute them with your thumb, because most people I see playing (including myself) do that. However, if it truly is impossible for your thumb to reach over the E and A strings, you can just allow the A string to ring and your palm should just naturally mute the E string when switching to Dmaj. In a D major triad the notes are D F# A, so it isn't wrong to allow the A string to ring it's just uncommon.
#11
+1 ^^

i dont know if i fully understood that post but i do strech my thumb over the top to mute strings, i have pretty long, boney fingers. (and my thumb)
"Been Dazed And Confused For So0 LoNg ItZ n0T Tru3"

Fender LoneStar Strat.
Peavy VYPYR.
#12
Use your thumb.
Thomas hopes to not have offended anyone with this post. No responsibility whatsoever is taken for any spelling or grammar mistakes, should there be any.

last.fm
#13
I've always wrapped my thumb around the fretboard when playing D so that I mute those two top strings

yup
#14
Hmm thanks guys, i will try all these out. And my hands aren't tiny, they're actually quite big, but i've got short little fingers. I can put my thumb over but to mute the A string as well i start compromising my actual D chord (i start fretting with the pads rather than the tips). Will check this out though guys cheers.
#15
Work on it by starting slow at first, then start doing it faster once you've got it at the lower speed
#16
You could try using the thumb of your fretting hand, over the top of the neck, to dampen the Low E and A strings.