#1
Okay so im going back to basics and starting to re-learn some stuff because i want to study more music theory. I know my open chords such as E, Em, A, Am, D, Dm, B, C, G, F, D7, E7, G7, A7, Em7, Am7 etc..

I also know how to construct major, minor, diminished, dominant 7, and 7th chords. My question is what else is there to practice? I want to work on voicings for jazz. To do this, would I just have to take chords and play them in different inversions myself or is there some other way to learn it? Oh and I also need help with learning what chords are in what key and that type of deal.

Any pointers?
Quote by csn00b
I hate seeing cute girls topless and what not, it just feels wrong.
#2
DIfferent inversions, yes. and you will have to work these out yourself. Remember to make as smooth a possible transition between each voice.
But, as well as inversions, you can use substitutions, or even just extensions. Hendrix used a lot of min7 chords with a #9.


Chords in what key?
This will help you

so for example, if you find a Bdim, it's more than likely part of a CMj pattern. If you find a Ddim, it will probably be part of an Eb pattern.
Last edited by mdwallin at Jul 26, 2009,
#3
you can also use you hand and count the letters and numbers for us that KISS (yes your thumb counts )

listen to your favorite bands .... use/learn their chords.....

take your favorite chords....... add a strum pattern......

boom song......


pick your favorite notes

you know those ones you always play

yeah those

you know the ones you hold up to your ear on an acoustic to listen to the "wah wha woooon" as it fades out...

pick those notes
#4
Quote by Backflash33

pick your favorite notes

you know those ones you always play

yeah those

you know the ones you hold up to your ear on an acoustic to listen to the "wah wha woooon" as it fades out...

pick those notes

I'm so glad I'm not the only one who does that
The A on the high E string is fantastic. Love that.
#5
Quote by mdwallin
I'm so glad I'm not the only one who does that
The A on the high E string is fantastic. Love that.



it's the 9th fret on the G string for me

(thats why i mentioned the pixies in the previous post )
#6
Quote by Backflash33
it's the 9th fret on the G string for me

(thats why i mentioned the pixies in the previous post )

slash liked that too. It plays a leading role in the Sweet Child of Mine soloes.
#7
i like slash so that makes sense and i did not know that so now i do

p.s. i just did a up bend and tapped with picky on high string and picked vibrato when i came down

( on 9th fret G )


lolz very slashyish you would be right


:edit: i just did that and went into a rolling stones-like riff what the hell you got me going on man :-P


(See first guy play the notes you like and cool stuff like that will pop up all the time)
Last edited by Backflash33 at Jul 26, 2009,
#8
ive been playing for 6 years so im running out things to play using the notes i like which is why i want to get into chords. Listen to the stuff in my sig and youll see what i mean.
Quote by csn00b
I hate seeing cute girls topless and what not, it just feels wrong.
#9
Quote by mdwallin
Hendrix used a lot of min7 chords with a #9.

Wasn't it a dom7 with a ♯9?
Wouldn't a min7 with a ♯9 just be a min7?

Example -
Em7 = E G B D
Em7♯9 = E G B D F♯♯

E7♯9 brings out the false relations with the ♯9 being enharmonic to the min3 and the maj3 both being present in the chord at the same time. This play between major and minor thirds is characteristic of the Blues and was picked up and exploited no end in Hendrix's playing.
Si
#10
Quote by Backflash33
it's the 9th fret on the G string for me

(thats why i mentioned the pixies in the previous post )


Mine's the 12th fret on the G string. It seems like all my improvisations are always based around that area, and I don't do it on purpose. And I also like the 14th fret being bent to 16... it gives me a hard-on everytime
#11
Quote by mdwallin
Hendrix used a lot of min7 chords with a #9.



It's a Dominant7 #9.

A #9 in a minor chord would be enharmonic to the minor third.
#12
Do a lot of work with circle progressions, meaning each chord leads into the chord a diatonic fourth above it, like Am7 Dm7 G7 Cmaj7 Fmaj7 Bm7b5 E7(just in case you didn't know, don't mean to be condescending if you did). That's a really natural chordal movement in any sort of music and will strengthen your voice leading a lot. Like mdwallin said, you want each voice in the chord transitioning into the next chord smoothly.
#13
Basically, you should find what intervals are in each chord. The basic major 7th chord has 1,3,5,7, so you would want to be able to find which notes are in these intervals and be able to play them all over the neck. It also helps you figure out other chords like a maj6 or maj9.
Zeppelin owns all
A recent study shows that 92% of all teenagers have moved on to rap music. Put this in your sig if you are one of the 8% who stayed with real music.
#16
Quote by jpgilbert701
Okay so im going back to basics and starting to re-learn some stuff because i want to study more music theory. I know my open chords such as E, Em, A, Am, D, Dm, B, C, G, F, D7, E7, G7, A7, Em7, Am7 etc..

I also know how to construct major, minor, diminished, dominant 7, and 7th chords. My question is what else is there to practice? I want to work on voicings for jazz. To do this, would I just have to take chords and play them in different inversions myself or is there some other way to learn it? Oh and I also need help with learning what chords are in what key and that type of deal.

Any pointers?
Barre chords, triads and their inversions, extended chords, altered chords....

Learn to harmonise the major scale by stacking 3rds (check out the Music Theory FAQ sticky) - that will enable you to construct diatonic chords in any key.
#17
Quote by jpgilbert701


Any pointers?


Learn how to build chords, then you dont need to learn them.
#18
Quote by zhilla
Barre chords, triads and their inversions, extended chords, altered chords....

Learn to harmonise the major scale by stacking 3rds (check out the Music Theory FAQ sticky) - that will enable you to construct diatonic chords in any key.

^^This.
It's one thing to know how chords work but another if you know why.
lol guitar
#19
I think i didnt put enough in my first post. Pretty much what i need to work on i guess is just learning other chords like 9, 11, 13, sus4, sus2 and 6 chords because i know how to harmonize the major scale to make triads and such. I think what i really need to learn is where the notes for whatever chord im looking at are all over the fretboard. I know the notes on the fretboard ive just been too lazy to learn how to play the chords all over the neck.
Quote by csn00b
I hate seeing cute girls topless and what not, it just feels wrong.
#20
If you know how to harmonise the scale extended chords are easy - you just keep stacking more 3rds on top. 6 chords are pretty similar - just add the 6th on top of your triad, giving you R,3,5,6. Sus2 and 4 chords you basically just replace the 3rd with the 2nd or 4th, depending on which you are using.

Can you find intervals quickly on the neck? I think thats at least as important as knowing the notes - if you can find intervals its easier to see how the notes of a chord will fit together on the neck.

Can you comfortably play barre chords all up the neck? If not, I'd learn A, E and C shaped barre chords. Learn the full A, E and C shaped arpeggios as well - with and without 7ths, as you'll start to recognise all your chord shapes within them. Then learn triad inversions - you'll find they are basically just little chunks of those arpeggios, and you can start to link them together if you want a fuller chord.
#21
Quote by zhilla
If you know how to harmonise the scale extended chords are easy - you just keep stacking more 3rds on top. 6 chords are pretty similar - just add the 6th on top of your triad, giving you R,3,5,6. Sus2 and 4 chords you basically just replace the 3rd with the 2nd or 4th, depending on which you are using.

Can you find intervals quickly on the neck? I think thats at least as important as knowing the notes - if you can find intervals its easier to see how the notes of a chord will fit together on the neck.

Can you comfortably play barre chords all up the neck? If not, I'd learn A, E and C shaped barre chords. Learn the full A, E and C shaped arpeggios as well - with and without 7ths, as you'll start to recognise all your chord shapes within them. Then learn triad inversions - you'll find they are basically just little chunks of those arpeggios, and you can start to link them together if you want a fuller chord.


Yeah I learned the CAGED system the other day so I got those shapes down. I already knew them i just didnt know that I knew them, if that makes sense. I never thought of the voicings like that even though it makes perfect sense and now it's really obvious since arpeggios have the same notes repeating.

Thanks for all the help.
Quote by csn00b
I hate seeing cute girls topless and what not, it just feels wrong.