#1
Hey UG,

I've been playing for at little over a year now, and I'm feeling as if I'm ready to start writing some simple songs. But when i go to get started, I feel like my playing doesn't advance in any way so i end up with the same crap over and over. I'm trying to write in the two pretty basic styles Pop-Punk/Emo(think Green Day, My Chemical Romance, Paramore) and a king of refreshed version of 80s style rock (think Bang Camaro)


I know all of the basic major, minor, and pentatonic scales but it feels like i dont know much else.


Can Somebody Please Tell Me What I Can Work On To Forward My Playing, and Give Me Some Tips On Writing In Those Styles.

I Know It Seems Like Alot to ask but if someone can help with anything please do so

Thanks
-Scala
#4
First Of All, Don't Capitalize Every, Word It Makes Reading Very Hard.

If you really want to write in that vein dissect a few of your favourite songs by those artists, look at what chords they use, what progressions, what scales they use in the solos, what harmonies the rhythm has, etc.

Also, don;t equate technichality with ebing able to wrote songs. Actually writing is as painstaking and requires as much practice if not more than any other technique.
Inhuman evil take down!
#6
Well, for some actual advice... Try to think up simple, catchy melodies in your head. Then try to sing them. Then figure them out on your guitar. That's a really easy way to start writing songs (at least for myself) and it should work out great for the simple stuff you want to write.

Once you have that central melody, start writing around it, adding more and more to it. Work out a chord progression that goes with the melody. Sing and play it at the same time to make sure it all works.

And, once you feel you can write pretty good music, start writing the music (riffs) first, then try to build melodies over them. Whatever feels the most comfortable. I tend to write melodies, then build around them, when writing my solo material. Yet, when I write for my progressive thrash metal band, I write riffs and let the singer come up with all the melodies.
#8
no offense man but dont most of the songs from those genres sound the same anyways? my advice is start listening to something else, then return to the pop punk s*** with those outside influences and i bet u could come up with a unique sound of your own. thats what i do when im stuck, just listen to other genres and apply some of that to my playing.
#9
Quote by Goodtimes666
no offense man but dont most of the songs from those genres sound the same anyways? my advice is start listening to something else, then return to the pop punk s*** with those outside influences and i bet u could come up with a unique sound of your own. thats what i do when im stuck, just listen to other genres and apply some of that to my playing.

They would only sound the same to someone who isn't a fan. Certainly some people would say all guitar solos sound the same, but we know that not to be true for us.
Inhuman evil take down!
#10
Quote by floydbert
Yeah. listen to better music.
Quote by Thor36
+1
Wow, what a pair of close-minded assholes.
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We trust - so we're betrayed
#11
I've always found it best to write with someone. You can get ideas for basic progressions and rhythmic styles, and than bounce them off a partner.

Considering how long you have been playing, I think that you could use some outside influence, because you don't actually know how what you are playing sounds to fresh ears.

In my band, the other guitar player and I have a very effective writing process. We have both been playing for many years and are from opposite sides of the country, with different influences, styles and expectations. Every song starts with a piece, such as a lead hook or even an acoustic strum pattern. We take what we have and bring it to a writing session. As we play with it and write extra parts, we can develop ideas with input.

If you don't have a partner to play with, at least record what you do write and listen to it and burn it into your memory. Variations will come to you, than you can go home and try to learn how to play what you are thinking of.

Also, ignore the haters... I can't stand the bands you listed either, but once you start writing, you'll find that your taste may change.
Last edited by HalfDose at Jul 26, 2009,
#13
Quote by ramm_ty
Wow, what a pair of close-minded assholes.


-1

Quote by floydbert
Yeah. listen to better music.


+1
#14
To all the people "+1"ing the "listen to better music" post: You guys ARE closed-minded assholes. Just because you don't like it doesn't make it bad. I don't like any music that's written with 12-tone technique, but that doesn't mean people don't enjoy listening to it. I can respect the fact that people like it and it's musical. Saying someone's music is bad is like saying someone's eye color is wrong. Nobody can help what kind of music they like, it's just inherent in your personality. So stop trying to make yourselves feel good by insulting someone else's musical tastes. It makes you seem like a douche.
#15
Quote by timeconsumer09
To all the people "+1"ing the "listen to better music" post: You guys ARE closed-minded assholes. Just because you don't like it doesn't make it bad. I don't like any music that's written with 12-tone technique, but that doesn't mean people don't enjoy listening to it. I can respect the fact that people like it and it's musical. Saying someone's music is bad is like saying someone's eye color is wrong. Nobody can help what kind of music they like, it's just inherent in your personality. So stop trying to make yourselves feel good by insulting someone else's musical tastes. It makes you seem like a douche.



You took the words out of my mouth

as the people who like "good music" say:

+1
#16
Well, one thing is that you need to do is make sure you are retaining the ideas that you come up when you are playing. Try printing off a bunch of sheets of blank tab and leave them in the area where you practice. Whenever you are playing, and happen upon something that sounds cool, stop and tab it out real quick. Revisit the stuff you've written down often and play around with it. Once you've got enough in your "library", you'll eventually start finding ideas that work together and can be become parts of a longer piece.

Also, remember most songs are pretty simple. Verse,chorus,verse,chorus,verse,chorus. Maybe an intro and a bridge. That's just 3 or 4 ideas to come up with. The tricky part is getting them to work together, but just keep trying. It doesn't matter if your first attempts aren't great, the most important part is that you keep trying stuff out. Don't psyche yourself out by telling yourself that it must be really good or it isn't worth trying.

Also, a really good way to make riffs/rhythms sound more interesting is to come up with a basic idea and throw variations in. A real common one is - main idea, main idea variation A, main idea, main idea variation B. Repeat. You see that one all the time.

Best of luck
#17
Quote by se012101
Well, one thing is that you need to do is make sure you are retaining the ideas that you come up when you are playing. Try printing off a bunch of sheets of blank tab and leave them in the area where you practice. Whenever you are playing, and happen upon something that sounds cool, stop and tab it out real quick. Revisit the stuff you've written down often and play around with it. Once you've got enough in your "library", you'll eventually start finding ideas that work together and can be become parts of a longer piece.

Also, remember most songs are pretty simple. Verse,chorus,verse,chorus,verse,chorus. Maybe an intro and a bridge. That's just 3 or 4 ideas to come up with. The tricky part is getting them to work together, but just keep trying. It doesn't matter if your first attempts aren't great, the most important part is that you keep trying stuff out. Don't psyche yourself out by telling yourself that it must be really good or it isn't worth trying.

Also, a really good way to make riffs/rhythms sound more interesting is to come up with a basic idea and throw variations in. A real common one is - main idea, main idea variation A, main idea, main idea variation B. Repeat. You see that one all the time.

Best of luck



great advice. thanks
#18
Man, just chill and let the ideas come to you, don't rush it. If you come up with a good starting idea and can't think of anything good to add to it. Wait a few months and you'll have something good to add to it. Or if you know your theory you could break it down then you your knowledge of what works well together to piece something up.
#19
Listen to better music.

Rip off some old songs.
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.
#20
Floydbert, Thor36, Will Swanson and solid s/hit...

check your emails for your warnings / bans
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