#1
I was checking out how 'sus' chords where formed, and I just noticed, isn't Csus2 and Am/C chord the same? Can a chord have 2 or more names?

Thanks. I'm a theory noob in training.
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#3
yes they can have two different names. Which ever is more relevant to the piece of music is the one you'd use.


I think.
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#4
It depends on context.

Slash chords are often used in stuff, where a triad stays the same, but the bass is moving.

Example;


e|----------|
B|-0--0--0--|
G|-1--1--1--|
D|-2--2--2--|
A|-------0--|
E|-0--2-----|

E - E/F♯ - E/A


They are also there to denote chords that have somewhat "hard" names.

The following chord theoretically could be called Csus4♯5♭9


e|----|
B|-6--|
G|-6--|
D|-6--|
A|----|
E|-8--|


Calling it D♭/C is however much easier to notate.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jul 26, 2009,
#5
Quote by Metallica1989
I was checking out how 'sus' chords where formed, and I just noticed, isn't Csus2 and Am/C chord the same? Can a chord have 2 or more names?

Thanks. I'm a theory noob in training.


Csus2 has a D in it

Am/C doesn't.
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#6
My understanding of this is:

Am/C = A minor(A,C,E) but with C root.

Csus2 = It's like a C major(C,E,G) but with 2nd instead of a 3rd, so it's C, D and G.
#7
Quote by Elegance_01
Csus2 has a D in it

Am/C doesn't.


lol

Damn, I still get confused easily. Thanks for the help guys
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#8
chords can have many different names and the name is normally dependant on the root.

Csus2 contains a Root (C) a 2nd to replace the 3rd (D) and a 5th (G)

an Am/C is an Am chord with a C as the root. so contains an (A) a 3rd (C, which in this case is the lowest note) and a 5th (E)

so in fact here we have
Csus2 = C D G
Am/C = (C) A C E
which are different chords and contain different notes

and example of 2 differently named chords which are enharmonic (same notes) would be
Cmaj7 = C E G B
Em6 = E G B C
the easiest way of deciding which this should be called would be to find the lowest note (root) and naming from there or to use the simplest name. Context also plays a part in deciding the name of the chord - but explaining can be complicated.
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Last edited by doive at Jul 26, 2009,
#9
Quote by doive
c
and example of 2 differently named chords which are enharmonic (same notes) would be
Cmaj7 = C E G B
Em6 = E G B C



No, Em6 has a C#.
#10
^^^

I'd like to add that Am/C is Called Am 1st inv.

Although technically correct, slash chords are usually written when there's a note in the bottom that is not present in the triad.

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#11
Quote by deHufter
Quote by doive
and example of 2 differently named chords which are enharmonic (same notes) would be
Cmaj7 = C E G B
Em6 = E G B C

No, Em6 has a C#.
It does indeed. The 6 is always major unless otherwise noted.

I think, doive, you were looking for C♯m7 and E6
C♯m7 = C♯ E G♯ B
E6 = E G♯ B C♯

E6 is enharmonic to C♯m7 in first inversion.

Note that C♯m is the relative minor of E major. By understanding this relationship we can also know that...

Am7 and C6 are enharmonic inversions of each other.

G6 and Em7 are enharmonic inversions of each other.

Bm7 and D6 are enharmonic inversions of each other.
etc
etc
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#12
and Csus2 (C, D, G) is also an enharmonic inversion of Gsus2 (G, C, D).
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#13
Quote by Aramoni
and Csus2 (C, D, G) is also an enharmonic inversion of Gsus2 (G, C, D).


Gsus4, you mean. Gsus2 is G, A, D. Gsus4 is G, C, D.
#14
Maybe we shouldn't forget to mention the augmented chords then because they lack a tonal center;

C E G# can be:

Caug
Eaug
G#aug
Last edited by deHufter at Jul 27, 2009,
#16
Sorry @ musicpurists, they're enharmonically equivalent, in other words, you cant hear the difference between a Caug and Eaug without context.

And no...G#aug doesnt contain a D#, that's the perfect 5th. And how do you come up with a B? That's the minor 3rd.
Last edited by deHufter at Jul 27, 2009,