#1
What kind of stuff do you guys practice with?

Is a clean setting preferable, or do you prefer to go for a more driven sound?
Or is it best to have time with both?

I ask because I'm limited equipment wise for a week or so, and only have an amp with a clean sound (the distortion is awful). I usually practice clean as well. Is this a good thing to do?

Opinions please?
Quote by strat0blaster
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#2
Depends on what your practising..... Playing open chords with lots of distortion sounds really bad...

And pinches, or just metal shredding doesn't sound good clean
#4
i like mine cranked and tamed with an EQ pedal in the effects loop,

i don't like too much gain when i'm playing heavy stuff. i like it, but i'd also like to hear the notes i'm playing.

also, playing passages with pristine clean often sounds good to the ears
#5
i practice with whatever tone the song uses
MY Music
AMPS:
Chute CC-04 2x12
GUITARS:
Fender American Deluxe Strat SSS (with DG-20's)
Martin Dx-1
PEDALS:
Big Muff Pi Tone Wicker
Keeley Mod Bluesdriver
Holy Grail Plus Reverb
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Boss RC-2 Loop pedal
#6
Quote by ChadHydro
If I'm practicing a solo usually I'll go with a clean sound just so I can better hear any mistakes I make and then can work on them


See, that's the approach I was going for.

And the clean sound for chords (as mentioned above) is also appealing to me (I'm a big EJ fan, so "crazy" chords are a bit of a staple!).

But then I feel like I'm sort of neglecting the drive sound the guitar is capable of. Again, anti has a point, PHs just don't work as well on a clean sound.

Alright, something that I've been thinking about, I read somewhere that you're more likely to practice better if you have a tone that you like. Do you think that's an opinion, or is there some truth behind it?
Quote by strat0blaster
HA!

Well played, my friend.

I'm going to edit that awful grammar right now


Yay, I'm sigged!!
And a grammar nazi..
#7
I use distortions to learn to play cleaner.... When you crank it up, you'll hear a lot of side-sounds like your hand going of a string, or your hand "scratching" the string between chords etc.
#8
A friend showed me yesterday that using distortion will more clearly show any problems with muting. So, if I think I might be having muting problems, I go with distortion, I go with clean when I'm working on playing cleanly.
#9
i play on clean for alot of my tech. practicing.
then i practice some of it on distortion.

i just use to practice all on distortion didnt help as much has doing it clean then to distoriton



Quote by Gunpowder
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#10
I always start playing clean. If the song is distorted in any way, I'll crank the distortion all the way up so I can be sure that I can play it correctly and mute everything I need to every time. Then I'll actually set up my amp to play to song as it ought to be played.
#11
Quote by sTarbuck

Alright, something that I've been thinking about, I read somewhere that you're more likely to practice better if you have a tone that you like. Do you think that's an opinion, or is there some truth behind it?


Well I can see how practicing with a tone that you like will make you want to practice more because you will like the way you sound and therefore will be motivated to practice more. If this is the case for you, I say go for it! I'm a firm believer in that there is not a "right" way to do anything, if you play long enough in a certain style or sound you will improve regardless. Just make sure it's FUN!
#12
Personally, most of the time I practice I do so unplugged, unless I'm specifically working on something that really benefits from playing into an amp (hammer-ons and pull-offs) or trying to get a tone for a song for when I'm with my band. It's simpler, works just as fine, and allows you to focus on your playing, and not what the equipment's doing.
#13
Quote by Geldin
I always start playing clean. If the song is distorted in any way, I'll crank the distortion all the way up so I can be sure that I can play it correctly and mute everything I need to every time. Then I'll actually set up my amp to play to song as it ought to be played.


There's your answer.
#14
Depends what you're practicing. I figure it'd get a little troublesome to try and play a distorted song clean, you know get all down cause it doesn't sound right. If you're just practicing technique, then sure clean is fine. You'll hear bum notes better and be able to correct your mistakes.
#15
Depending on how the parts sit in a song. I practice all parts clean to start with, until I feel i have confidence in the parts. Then i practice them in to the song with the required effects, so u dont get extra squeals. I tend to always practice things clean to start with, and I run straight into my mixing desk, with no e.q or effects, so im also learning the sound of my actual guitar.
#16
Quote by LordBaxtus
Personally, most of the time I practice I do so unplugged, unless I'm specifically working on something that really benefits from playing into an amp (hammer-ons and pull-offs) or trying to get a tone for a song for when I'm with my band. It's simpler, works just as fine, and allows you to focus on your playing, and not what the equipment's doing.


Me too, though in my case, a lot of it is a practical issue - I have two young kids, and I often work late, so if the only time I can play is from 11pm-1am, then it has to be unplugged. It's worst during the school year - my 6 year old has to be in bed by 8:30 or so, so during that time I'll pretty much only play plugged in on the weekend. This is not helped by the fact that I've got a full stack. You turn that thing up to "1", and the entire house is rockin'! You can't even play in the same room as the amp for long! It's pretty frickin' sweet, though I am playing with the idea of getting a little combo amp for practice.

It doesn't affect my enjoyment of the instrument any, and does wonders for picking clearly and projecting, and for getting your legato to sound clearly. If you can get stuff sounding aggressive unplugged, then it sounds pretty good when you do plug in. Downsides - stuff where muting is an issue such as combining string skips and tapping - though over time I've gotten pretty attuned to the slightest bit of string noise - because I know it will be more of a problem plugged in. I also find I press down a bit harder than I need to, but that usually goes away within an hour or so of playing plugged in. So I can't go quite as fast when I'm not plugged in.

When I do play plugged in, sometimes I'll crank the distortion, but usually I'll just play straight into the amp on the dirty channel. I've got active pickups, so turning on the little pre-amp thing allows me to split the difference too.
Last edited by se012101 at Jul 27, 2009,
#17
A clean sound is best for when you're trying to achieve consistent picking, whereas practicing with some distortion will help you with muting unwanted string noise.