#1
So did I do this right? I can't really find anywhere to check myself.
o = diminished (I don't know what everyone else uses)

Dorian - i ii III IV v vio VII
Phrygian - i II III iv vo VI vii
Lydian - I II iii ivo V vi vii
Mixolydian - I ii iiio IV v vi VII
Aeolian - i iio III iv v VI VII
Locrian - io II iii iv V VI vii


I know in Major the standard is basically I IV V I
Does anyone know the basic chord progressions for each mode? I know you can do whatever you want, but what is the most basic one. I want to put the chords into my M13 and practice playing in each mode so I don't really want anything complex to start with.
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#3
^^That

To elaborate on it.

CHord progression as we know it are build upon the foundation of the Major scale.

Those guide lines do not apply for modes.

Even for the minor scale they are awkward, hence you got stuff like Harmonic minor and melodic minor.

You need to play vamp style progressions, or achieve the effect of strongly establishing the root of the mode.

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#4
Without care, a modal progression will resolve to the Ionian mode's I or maybe Aeolian's i. For instance, you could be playing a D Dorian progression, but do something that would destroy the dorian-ness, sending your resolution to C rather than D. To get around this, modal progressions are usually 1 or 2 (maybe 3) chord vamps. One of the chords will be the "1" of whatever mode you want (F in F Lydian; G in G Phrygian; et cetera). The other will contain the "modal tone". The modal tone is the note that makes a mode that mode. For Phrygian, it is the b2; for Dorian, it is the nat6. Dorian progressions are the easiest, so that will be my example.

I'm writing a song in A Dorian. Naturally, I use an Am chord (which is interchangeable with Am7 in the context, more or less). Now, the modal tone of Dorian is the nat6. The nat6 of A is F#. What chords in the key of G (the parent scale of A Dorian) contain F# notes? There's F#dim, D, and Bm. F#dim very much wants to go to G, so I don't use it. D, however, works very well. In fact, I play D7. While D7 typically wants to resolge to G, I force the resolution to Am and Am7; this creates the "modal sound". Bm works as well, but I find that D7 just sounds better. Many people agree; i7 IV7 is the classic Dorian vamp and probably the easiest/most popular modal progression.

Edit: Understanding this algorithm precludes neither creativity nor experimentation. If something works, it works.

Also, I'm not entirely sure what it is Munky is trying to say about Lydian (in reference to this post), but I find Lydian the most difficult mode for progression-writing (save Locrian...duh!). I have yet to play something that's more than one chord or several chords rooted on the same note but have different extensions (ex. F - Fmaj7#11 - Fmaj9#11 or something; I didn't play that, so it may sound terrible).
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jul 26, 2009,
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Without care, a modal progression will resolve to the Ionian mode's I or maybe Aeolian's i. For instance, you could be playing a D Dorian progression, but do something that would destroy the dorian-ness, sending your resolution to C rather than D. To get around this, modal progressions are usually 1 or 2 (maybe 3) chord vamps. One of the chords will be the "1" of whatever mode you want (F in F Lydian; G in G Phrygian; et cetera). The other will contain the "modal tone". The modal tone is the note that makes a mode that mode. For Phrygian, it is the b2; for Dorian, it is the nat6. Dorian progressions are the easiest, so that will be my example.

I'm writing a song in A Dorian. Naturally, I use an Am chord (which is interchangeable with Am7 in the context, more or less). Now, the modal tone of Dorian is the nat6. The nat6 of A is F#. What chords in the key of G (the parent scale of A Dorian) contain F# notes? There's F#dim, D, and Bm. F#dim very much wants to go to G, so I don't use it. D, however, works very well. In fact, I play D7. While D7 typically wants to resolge to G, I force the resolution to Am and Am7; this creates the "modal sound". Bm works as well, but I find that D7 just sounds better. Many people agree; i7 IV7 is the classic Dorian vamp and probably the easiest/most popular modal progression.


One thing to consider is that the #4(#11) heard against the Major I chord is the lydian sound/ color. So choosing chords that have what you refer to as the "modal tone" doesn't really work in the way that you imply. The melody notes are heard as they relate to the supporting chord, so playing F# over Bm does not give the lydian sound.... it's F# over C that does. It's probably true that the chords for many modal progression do include the defining color tone, but it's not a requirement as you imply. Just as an example you could have a Dorian progression that goes | i - III IV :|
shred is gaudy music
#6
I've found the best way to make modal progressions to use the IV and V chords of the relative ionian mode and use them over the root of your mode you want to use.

For example: F Lydian G/F --> F

B Mixolydian B --> A/B

C aeolian Ab/C ---> Bb/C

Etc.

You'll find the distintictive note of each mode is including in the progression (#4 in lydian for example).
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 26, 2009,
#7
Quote by griffRG7321
I've found the best way to make modal progressions to use the IV and V chords of the relative ionian mode and use them over the root of your mode you want to use.

For example: F Lydian G/F --> F

B Mixolydian B --> A/B

C aeolian Ab/C ---> Bb/C

Etc.

You'll find the distintictive note of each mode is including in the progression (#4 in lydian for example).


Interesting.

I wouldn't say there is any "best" way, but that certainly is A way. Also, you should know it's not required that the distinctive note be part of every chord in the progression.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
Interesting.

I wouldn't say there is any "best" way, but that certainly is A way. Also, you should know it's not required that the distinctive note be part of every chord in the progression.


Got any examples of those? I'm not questioning it i genuinely want to know
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
One thing to consider is that the #4(#11) heard against the Major I chord is the lydian sound/ color. So choosing chords that have what you refer to as the "modal tone" doesn't really work in the way that you imply. The melody notes are heard as they relate to the supporting chord, so playing F# over Bm does not give the lydian sound.... it's F# over C that does. It's probably true that the chords for many modal progression do include the defining color tone, but it's not a requirement as you imply. Just as an example you could have a Dorian progression that goes | i - III IV :|


While I agree that the modal note is not a requirement in a progression in order for one to play modal melodies, I always thought you should consider melody notes both vertically and horizontally. That is you hear them as they relate to the overall key centre as part of a nicely contoured melodic line, while at the same time you hear it in relation to the harmony and the chord it is being played over at the time.

So if your tonic is C and your melody takes you to an F♯ over a Bm chord you will hear that F♯ as a P5 in relation to the Bm chord but you will also hear it as an Aug 5th in relation to the linear melodic line in C.

I think if it appears as part of the inner voice or even in the melody over that Bm on a weak beat as a passing tone Lydian flavour will be far less perceptible.

Si
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
I always thought you should consider melody notes both vertically and horizontally. That is you hear them as they relate to the overall key centre as part of a nicely contoured melodic line, while at the same time you hear it in relation to the harmony and the chord it is being played over at the time.


That's a good point, and I don't disagree, but the idea that each chord must include the "modal note" was proposed as a method (actually a requirement) for constructing modal chord progressions which would lead one to avoid chords that don't have the "modal tone". THAT was quite obviously the point that I was arguing against.


Quote by griffRG7321
Got any examples of those? I'm not questioning it i genuinely want to know


Well you could have something like:

|Dm - Dm - F - G :|

( D dorian i - i - III - IV )
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 27, 2009,
#11
Modal Progressions:
Going through UG I found a couple of queries and answers to modal playing, but I didn’t find one that suited the needs of a student who seriously wants to learn the sound of a mode. The best way to do it is by having all the examples centred on the same note. This way you learn a few things at once:

1. Comparing the sound of each mode from the same starting point
2. Learning 7 different keys (for the serious student)
3. Jamming over a few different feels in order to try to convey the simple “mood” the mode provides.

In my examples I focused on the I-IV-V chord progression, and most of them with the C in the bass. Slash chords deluxe if you wish . I also focused on guitar as the medium to work from. Yes, you can replace the guitar and work with keyboards or bass, but this uses guitar. Now the diagrams that follow are merely showing the chords I was aiming for, no rhythms involved. The tracks themselves are watered down to guitar and drums, looped vamps, nothing fancy. Happy jamming!

Example 1: C Ionian (Cmaj7 – F/C – G/C) Key of C

Example 2: C Dorian (Cm – F/C – Gm7/C) Key of Bb

Example 3: C Phrygian (Cm7 – Fm/C – Gm7b5/C) Key of Ab

Example 4: C Lydian (C – F#m7b5 – Gsus2) Key of G

Example 5: C Mixolydian (C – F/C – Gm7add11) Key of F
Attachments:
ionian.JPG
dorian.JPG
phrygian.JPG
lydian.JPG
mixo.GIF
Last edited by evolucian at Jul 27, 2009,
#12
forgive the double post....

Example 6: C Aeolian (Cm – Fm7add13 – Gm7/C) Key of Eb

Example 7: C Locrian (Cm7b5 – Fmadd11 – Gmaj7b5) Key of Db

Although the picture in example7 says F7sus4, I forgot to change it to Fmadd11, lol, my bad. These examples will give you a better idea of the mode when soloing over them. 7 Keys to experiment in. I didn’t elaborate on the scales themselves. Reason being, if you got this far in guitar, you know what you are looking for and if you use the said scale against the progression, you will hear it for yourself. Train your ears, that’s all there is to it.
Of course you can change the chord progression to anything you’d like, this lesson would merely serve as a primer. To change the progression, always make your root the “I” of the progression. With that in mind, there is quite a lot of work left ahead of you, enjoy and have lots of fun learning the beautiful instrument and the delicate art of music. But keep this in mind… create music, not a wankfest. Shred has its place, but not in order to learn the sound of the mode.

***Disclaimer: This lesson is not meant to stand on anyone’s toes, or disregard their work as fiction. This is merely a different viewpoint and hopefully it helps ***

PS: the tracks are on my page if you want to listen prior to grabbing them. When I've uploaded them to boxnet I'll post the link http://www.box.net/shared/zclguona7r
Attachments:
aeolian.JPG
locrian.JPG
Last edited by evolucian at Jul 27, 2009,
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky


Well you could have something like:

|Dm - Dm - F - G :|

( D dorian i - i - III - IV )


The 'flavour note' of the dorian mode is the natural 6th isn't it?

If so, the note is uncluded in that progression in the G chord.
#14
Why is there a debate on the flavour note?

I mean, the whole reason you choose to play a mode is because of the flavour note.

It needs to appear at least in the tonic chord, but like Munky said; It doesn't have to be present in each chord in a modal vamp.

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#15
Quote by griffRG7321
The 'flavour note' of the dorian mode is the natural 6th isn't it?

If so, the note is uncluded in that progression in the G chord.



Well the natural 6 would be D. Yep it's in the G chord...... not in the F though.
shred is gaudy music