#1
i know what a scale is i know minor and major pentatonic not so much major scales but their not my main problem its the modes what are they and how are they related and if you anser explain it in a way i can understand it not so many big words lol
#2
Okay, I'm gonna try my best to explain this.

Scales and modes. Okay...

So you take your Ionian scale and you break it down into 8 modes:
1. Ionian (major)
2. Dorian (minor, natural 6)
3. Phrygian (minor, flat 2)
4. Lydian (major, sharp 4)
5. Mixolydian (major, flat 7)
6. Aolian (minor)
7. Locrian (minor flat 2 and 5)
8. Ionian (major)

Each number means the note of the scale. Each note is whats called a mode and stands for another scale, which are broken down further into degrees stated in parentheses.

Hope I helped...
#3
Alright, I'm going to try to explain what first made modes "click" to me. At first, I just didn't get it at all...

When thinking of modes, it's more important to concentrate on what you are playing OVER, rather than what YOU are playing. What makes a mode a mode is the way the notes of the mode "react" to the root note when played in a sequence. Therefore, you could be playing a G Major scale, but if you are playing it over a C chord, then the notes are reacting in a manner that is called the Lydian mode.

Here is a graph of modes, with their relation to the natural G Major scale.

I. G Ionian (or natural Major)
II. A Dorian
III. B Phrygian
IV. C Lydian
V. D Mixolydian
VI. E Aeolian (or natural minor)
VII. F# Locrian

Now, just to get your ear to connect with what you see, I suggest tuning your low E string to the different notes of this scale, then playing the scale over the droning root note. ex. Tune your low E to a C, then hit the note, letting it drone out, while playing the "G Major" scale notes on the other strings over it. This will give the sound of C Lydian.

Note:
This was just a TINY little representation of what helped me to first understand modes. I hope it helps you in your quest for musical knowledge! If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to ask!
#4
taking C major

CDEFGAB (fretboard formula for a major scale WWHWWWH) W=whole step H = half step (tone and semitone respectively)

the C minor scale (WHWWHWW) CDEbFGAbB

i find it easier to remember the formulae then write down the notes, but for actual playing certain modes have a MOOD to them some examples.

IONIAN,MIXLOYDIAN,=HAPPY
AEOLIAN=SAD
PHRYGIAN=SPANISH SOUND
LOCRIAN=WEIRD (slightly)OFF SOUND
LYDIAN=KIND OF ARABIC
#5
If you don't yet fully understand the major scale there's absolutely no point even worrying about modes yet, let alone trying to understand them.
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#8
None of these explanations are complete or completely accurate, ignore them. Forget modes. Learn the major scale. Learn to harmonize it and practice the major and minor scale. You will use them most of the time (if not all of it). Come back to modes when you have a much greater knowledge of these things.
#9
Quote by timeconsumer09
None of these explanations are complete or completely accurate, ignore them. Forget modes. Learn the major scale. Learn to harmonize it and practice the major and minor scale. You will use them most of the time (if not all of it). Come back to modes when you have a much greater knowledge of these things.



+1

You need a solid grasp on the fundamentals before moving on to modes.

It's kinda like trying learn algebra when you're still struggling with basic math. it's just not gonna happen.
shred is gaudy music
#10
The problem everyone faces when they try and learn modes is that they can't see the point, they don't see how it's different to playing the major scale over a whole song. Until you reach things with more complicated harmony, you can't see their point, and fair enough.

As has been said learn the major scale. Also if you want to improvise and solo, learn the pentatonic major scale first then add the extra notes from the major scale, it really helps you identify dissonance in your improvising from the start.