#1
I recently changed my strings to a heavier gauge and the neck bowed a bit, so I decided to tighten the rod. Well, I got carried away and now some weird ****'s going down in the neck. There are like divots where the string goes lower than the other points on the string and the neck is noticeably bent around the 6th fret. The divot makes the action lower from the first fret to 6-7th. The guitar neck also looks like it is bowing, but there is no substantial gap as if it was. I looked this up on google and according to Fret Not Guitar Repair, my neck fits the decription of "Squirrelly Necks". Is there any way I can get rid of that neck bow/ string divot thing?

Also, I can't go to a guitar shop any time soon, which complicates things.
#2
If there is a neck bow forward, turn the truss rod so it bends back, I think you need to have like a dual action rod for that, corretc me if I'm wrong someone.
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#4
rule 1: if you dont know what you are doing take it to a professional.
rule 2: when in doubt refer to rule 1.

you could potentially damage the truss rod and that would be a much pricier repair job.

if you insist on doing it yourself then refer to the searchbar, because this has been covered here already, or google since you are not the first, nor the last, to mess with your truss rod.
#5
Quote by noisefarmer
rule 1: if you dont know what you are doing take it to a professional.
rule 2: when in doubt refer to rule 1.

you could potentially damage the truss rod and that would be a much pricier repair job.

if you insist on doing it yourself then refer to the searchbar, because this has been covered here already, or google since you are not the first, nor the last, to mess with your truss rod.


Good job reading my first post. If I could take it to a professional, I wouldn't be asking the denizen of Ultimate Guitar.
#6
Well reading the information under 'Squirelly neck' on the link you gave, it'd be much cheaper and easier to buy a new guitar.

"And because they are most often seen on inexpensive instruments, time and effort must be kept to a minimum or the investment to repair may exceed the instruments value"

If it happened why you put heavier gauge strings on, have you tried returning to lighter gauges and waiting 24hrs or so to see if the neck returns to it's original/a good shape.

What gauge strings did you use? If a guitar is designed for heavy gauges, it usually have carbon-fiber inserts along with the truss rod to keep it stable.
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#7
I put on those 10-52 gauge strings. I moved up from 10's, then I went a little nuts with the rod. I'll be sure to try going back to lighter strings when I get the chance to buy them.

Right now this neck bow stuff is cosmetic and has no effect on how the guitar plays. It just looks a little retarded.
#8
Firstly, if there's no shops near you, where are you going to get your strings? If you say "internet" then you can also search for a guitar tech near you.

I know this GB&C but still, Jonoelmuffinman has it right in this situation. If you like your guitar and it is valuable to you then take it to a good tech. The truss rod isn't just something like bridge action or pickup height. If you don't know what you're doing (or didn't read up on it first ) then don't risk it.

If the guitar doesn't mean much to you, then go ahead and try it. Read up on truss rods and then give it ago.
#9
Quote by JonoElMuffinMan
Good job reading my first post. If I could take it to a professional, I wouldn't be asking the denizen of Ultimate Guitar.


understandable, but this is a case where if you don't know what you are doing it probably isnt best to experiment with your guitar. especially if you have the tendency to get "carried away" like you said in your initial post. if you dont have someone to adjust it locally i'd look into perhaps taking a drive somewhere or even sending it by mail/ups/fedex. if you still insist on doing it yourself then read everything you can find on adjusting necks so that you have somewhat of an idea of what you are doing since obviously you dont, or else you wouldnt have gotten carried away adjusting the neck.
#10
Cool story, bro.

I would take it in, but my parents would probably respond "another trip, wry u spend money on that guitar" and then proceed to berate me on how much money I spent on services on some 200 dollar guitar, such as the setup I got before. I attempted to reason with them the importance of the neck, but with no avail. After that, I stopped caring. The playability is fine, it just looks retarded. The action looks stupidly low in some places, but that doesn't interfere with anything. I'll probably save up for a new guitar.

Thanks guys.
#11
Well, I feel as though nobody actually helped you in this thread, which isn't very surprising.

You should really try readjusting your truss rod. Back it off counter clockwise until the neck has an upward bow from string tension. This is where you should work from. Doing quarter turns (clockwise) at a time, get the neck until it's pretty flat. You can check how flat it is by eye. Grab the guitar, with the headstock facing away from you, and look down each edge of the neck to see for straightness. Then do the same but with the body away from you. It'll really give you an idea of how straight the neck is.

After that, put each string in tune. Fret each string at each fret and check for buzz.

Usually, if all of the strings buzz around a certain fret, it's a high or low fret. If you get a lot of buzzing in a general area over 2 or more frets, I'd say that's from an unlevel board.

Other than that, google fret jobs. Look for crowning and all of that.
#12
Quote by ohspyro89
Well, I feel as though nobody actually helped you in this thread, which isn't very surprising.

You should really try readjusting your truss rod. Back it off counter clockwise until the neck has an upward bow from string tension. This is where you should work from. Doing quarter turns (clockwise) at a time, get the neck until it's pretty flat. You can check how flat it is by eye. Grab the guitar, with the headstock facing away from you, and look down each edge of the neck to see for straightness. Then do the same but with the body away from you. It'll really give you an idea of how straight the neck is.

After that, put each string in tune. Fret each string at each fret and check for buzz.

Usually, if all of the strings buzz around a certain fret, it's a high or low fret. If you get a lot of buzzing in a general area over 2 or more frets, I'd say that's from an unlevel board.

Other than that, google fret jobs. Look for crowning and all of that.


Thanks, man.

Should I go back to 10's first, then try that? I have a feeling it might be the uneven tension the 10-52 gives on the neck.
#13
Could you post photos so I could have a look how bad it actually seems. And you shouldn't need to change string gauge. Use whatever gauge you want as long as isn't rediculous and set the guitar up from there.
#15
Quote by supergerbil
Could you post photos so I could have a look how bad it actually seems. And you shouldn't need to change string gauge. Use whatever gauge you want as long as isn't rediculous and set the guitar up from there.


I have no idea how to take a picture of the neck without making it look like crap.
#16
When adjusting a truss rod you should always allow the wood to conform naturally on its own for at least a couple of days. Sure you are tweaking the truss rod and you are making the wood bow in ways it was not meant to be bowed so now loosen the rod in 1/4 turns and let sit for two days then repeat as necessary. The neck needs to have a chance to settle so you can know where you stand. Also If you didn't read up on adjusting a truss rod you probably shouldn't have messed with it in the first place. Peace, Shawn