#1
Okay i've got a Laney VC 15, which i love to bits. So i was looking at what other owners were saying about it and this came up on harmoney central:

*
I'm gigging with this amp almost every week and the volume knob is always at 5.
In order to keep safe i'm keeping the tubes at horizontal position meaning that i'm placing the amp over the 212 cabinet with the knobs looking straight ahead and not the sky.
This is an old trick that you have to do with ALL THE AMPS that their tubes are placed upside down for a hotter perfomance.Its not a flaw,no no,but if you need to extend the life of your amp you need to deal with it like i've described above.

I have abused this amp for over a year and its working perfect.
*


does this actually work?

Thanks guys
#2
I can't comment on whether it works or not, but surely if that was the optimum way of making an amp work, surely they would have designed it that way?

There are combo's out there that have knobs facing the sky (Fender hot Rods, Traynor's etc to name a couple), owners wouldn't put the speaker facing down to the floor would they?

I'd stick with the way you have it mate, unless you're experiencing problems.
#3
...It makes no real difference, the only difference is tubes facing upwards would be slightly cooler than tubes facing down, just because heat rises. God knows. Sounds a bit stupid to me.
#4
I wouldn't really try it....
To buy:

Line 6 MM4
Voodoo Lab power
Mesa Boogie Single rectifier
Done
Boss TU-3 Done
Shure SM58 Done



OUCH MY WALLET
#5
as far as you know, it may be that that guy is just superstitious,
maybe he thinks that by putting his amp in that position he can save it,
it's probably just a myth.
(P.S-avatar brothers high five)
#6
Not worth the risks.
Quote by chip46
"I'm discontinuing production on the Timmy now as well. It might come back into production at some point down the road, but probably not because people will just clone it anyway cause they're stupid jerk face doo doo heads. -Paul C."
#7
Your gonna help one issue but cause another... It takes the heat off of one hot spot and in turn moving the hot spot inside the amp somewhere else. The amp designers know exactly where the heat goes and what it hits. Once you start moving the amp you are messing up that flow and it could be overheating something else that is not meant to be overheated.
#9
I'm confused as to how that would do anything at all other than potentially cause your amp to heat up in ways it was never originally designed to.

It's not as if the electricity running through the tubes is subject to some kind of gravitational reprieve - last I checked, electricity wasn't really subject to the laws of gravity anyways.
Quote by Marty Friedman
Because I bend in such an unorthodox fashion; the notes kinda slide up and slide down...
#10
Quote by ch0
I'm confused as to how that would do anything at all other than potentially cause your amp to heat up in ways it was never originally designed to.

It's not as if the electricity running through the tubes is subject to some kind of gravitational reprieve - last I checked, electricity wasn't really subject to the laws of gravity anyways.

Not familiar with quantum physics, or string theory are we?


(Please do not respond, by using those phrases I have exhausted my knowledge of both.)

TS - The only benefit I could see is that the tubes are less likely to rattle out and fall, but if you check them to see they're tight before you play, especially after moving it, you'll be fine.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
Last edited by tubetime86 at Jul 28, 2009,
#12
The guy sounds like a tool. Why would he abuse an amp anyway....GOD!!!! PEOPLE MAKE ME ANGRY.

Ok I'm done.
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Highway One Telecaster
Dean Evo
Mesa F-50
Laney GH50L
Vox AC30 C2
Ampeg V2
pedals
#13
Quote by tubetime86
Not familiar with quantum physics, or string theory are we?


(Please do not respond, by using those phrases I have exhausted my knowledge of both.)


I yield, sir.
Quote by Marty Friedman
Because I bend in such an unorthodox fashion; the notes kinda slide up and slide down...
#14
Electricity is absolutely subject to gravity. An electric current is made up of things that have mass (albeit very small mass, mass nonetheless) and thus will be affected by gravity. The thing is though, that these are vacuum tubes. I'm no tube amp expert or physics expert or any other kind of expert, but it seems to me that since the inside of the tubes are in a vacuum state, the direction that the tube is facing would have absolutely no effect at all on the sound. That is unless the name vacuum tube does not actually mean what it would appear to mean. Anybody?

The only effect I can imagine is what others said about heat dissipating into directions other than the ones intended by the engineers that designed the amp.
#15
Jim, I'm confused about what kind of point you're trying to make.

Alright, electricity is subject to the pull of gravity - regardless of the fact that it will travel straight up a wire when even the most pitiful current is applied. I'd argue that the effects of gravity are so small upon electrons that the absence of it would have no measurable consequence. (I'm looking at you, international space station)

Also, vacuums don't void gravity and since gravity has almost no pull over electricity (lol) I can't see why the presence of atmosphere inside a 'vacuum tube' would make any difference in how the tube behaves. It's not as if a tube that's oriented horizontally is going to behave differently than one that's vertical.

Please elaborate.
Quote by Marty Friedman
Because I bend in such an unorthodox fashion; the notes kinda slide up and slide down...