#1
A friend of mine is interested in purchasing an acoustic guitar. She plays mostly pop rock and the like, like Justin Nouzuka, etc.

Anyways i told her that acoustic electrics are identical to acoustics most of the time, just with the option of plugging in. is this true?

also with a price range of about 700$ canadian, what would be a good guitar for a beginner, that would last her a long time. (meaning she wouldn't have to upgrade)

thx for the help.
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#2
I would say if she plans to ever perform, she should probably get an acoustic-electric. I think you're in Canada, check out Seagull, which I find top quality at a discount. I have the entourage mini jumbo, which was about $300 and I've played it for two years with great results.
#3
Quote by seek_&_destroy
A friend of mine is interested in purchasing an acoustic guitar. She plays mostly pop rock and the like, like Justin Nouzuka, etc.

Anyways i told her that acoustic electrics are identical to acoustics most of the time, just with the option of plugging in. is this true?

also with a price range of about 700$ canadian, what would be a good guitar for a beginner, that would last her a long time. (meaning she wouldn't have to upgrade)

thx for the help.


Who? Never heard of him...

Anyway, back to the question. Yeah, that is true. The only difference (expect that acoustic electrics can plug into an amp) is that normally acoustics have nylon strings while acoustic electrics have steel. Other than that nothing. Oh and maybe that acoustic-electrics are most likely to have cutaways and pickguards. You can also get tuners on acoustic electrics which are built in.

I can't really recommend a guitar because its really up to her, plus I'm not good with choosing guitars.. I'm more of a "This looks good, Let's Buy this One" or "WOAH! Thanks for buying me this guitar I've never seen or heard of before" lol. Really I recommend you go to local guitar stores first and check out some of those. Then get a feel for what type of guitar you want (i.e: Acoustic/Acoustic-Electric, Steel/Nylon Strings, String Size, Cutaway/No Cutaway.. etc.)


Anyway, Happy Playing.
Hope she finds her perfect guitar!
#4
You don't get acoustics that you can't upgrade/won't have to until you get to the +$1500 US (typically).

At that price range, your advantage in buying a straight acoustic guitar is that you'll probably/almost definately get a better guitar for the money. However, if she ever does plan on playing live, it IS very handy to be able to just plug in and go (though I prefer the sound quality you get from micing acoustics.)

It really just comes down to what guitar you absolutely fall in love with for the price
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#5
Quote by Fieryhead
Who? Never heard of him...

Anyway, back to the question. Yeah, that is true. The only difference (expect that acoustic electrics can plug into an amp) is that normally acoustics have nylon strings while acoustic electrics have steel. Other than that nothing. Oh and maybe that acoustic-electrics are most likely to have cutaways and pickguards. You can also get tuners on acoustic electrics which are built in.


umm are you sure about that? i'm pretty sure only classical guitars have nylon strings.
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#6
Quote by seek_&_destroy
umm are you sure about that? i'm pretty sure only classical guitars have nylon strings.


^ this is true
#7
there is no beginner guitar that players won't want to upgrade as they have more money. still, these are probably the best you can get that come in around your price range, and they're actually pretty good guitars, all with solid tops, with entry level electronics. that's more than you can say about cheap ibanez and ovation guitars, which don't have solid tops and don't sound as good.

seagull s6 the original q1 - the s6 is a great guitar, good sound, short scale somewhat wide neck that's easier to play and the difference here is that you can plug it in.
http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seagull-S6-AcousticElectric-Guitar?sku=512121

a couple more seagulls - i hear they're a bit cheaper if you can find them in a store in canada. while i love the s6, she may prefer the look and finish of one of these.

mini jumbo:
http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seagull-Entourage-Series-Dreadnought-Mini-Jumbo-QI-AcousticElectric-Guitar?sku=516908

dread:
http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seagull-Entourage-Series-Dreadnought-QI-AcousticElectric-Guitar?sku=516906

yamaha fsx730sc - i tried a few of these. they sound good and feel good and look good. too. narrower neck than the seagull
http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-FGX730SC-Solid-Top-AcousticElectric-Guitar?sku=582169

yamaha FJX720SC - haven't tried one of these, but yamaha is very consistent and jumbos are actually easier to hold for me (i'm a short woman) than dreads.
http://europe.yamaha.com/en/products/musical_instruments/guitars_basses/el_ac_guitars/fjx720sc_natural/?mode=overview
#8
Quote by patticake


yamaha fsx730sc - i tried a few of these. they sound good and feel good and look good. too. narrower neck than the seagull
http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-FGX730SC-Solid-Top-AcousticElectric-Guitar?sku=582169

yamaha FJX720SC - haven't tried one of these, but yamaha is very consistent and jumbos are actually easier to hold for me (i'm a short woman) than dreads.
http://europe.yamaha.com/en/products/musical_instruments/guitars_basses/el_ac_guitars/fjx720sc_natural/?mode=overview


Have to concur with the Yamaha. I just spent the day at Guitar Center playing the $500 - $800 acoustic electric guitars. There's a huge difference in the way they sound unplugged versus plugged in. I tried Breedlove, Takamine, Seagull, Ibanez, and Yamaha. I like the way the Takamine, Seagull, and Yamaha feel. The Yamaha - IMHO - sounded and played the best. I played the FGX730SC which sells for $499 online. With the exception of the Yamaha the other guitars when plugged in sound "quacky" or "squeeky" on the G, B, and E strings. The Yamaha has a full, rich sound plugged in. No squeeky!! It's a real eye opener because the price is so low and the guitar is really good!
#9
Well said above me. However, keep in mind that tone is all in the ears of the beholder. It just depends on what you think sounds best, which will be different than another person's interpretation of good tone.
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#10
Quote by seek_&_destroy
A friend of mine is interested in purchasing an acoustic guitar. She plays mostly pop rock and the like, like Justin Nouzuka, etc.

Anyways i told her that acoustic electrics are identical to acoustics most of the time, just with the option of plugging in. is this true?

also with a price range of about 700$ canadian, what would be a good guitar for a beginner, that would last her a long time. (meaning she wouldn't have to upgrade)

thx for the help.


Check out the Yamaha FGX730SC - about $500 US. Sounds great plugged and unplugged. Awesome entry level guitar.