#1
So i am getting there with my theory, but the word dominant tends to spring up and it confuses me. im not sure a) what dominant scales sound like if i am listening to music and not sure how and why dominants are included in chords and scales (when no other scale degree is prominant).
#2
i will try to help!
dominant means the 5th degree/note/chord of the ionian scale
it also is an adjective, a chord is dominant if it contains a flat seventh
so, in the ionian mode, the chords and theire sevenths are
cmaj7 dm7 em7 fmaj7 g7 am7 bhalfdiminshed

the second third fifth sixth and seventh all contain the dominant 7th
the second third fifth an sixth are usually called dominant
and the fifth one, the g7, is usually 'the' dominant chord
the fifth chord is the only major chord with a dominant seventh
it also has a tritone between the third and seventh degree, and the third and seventh are also leading tones to the first and third degrees of the I chord. the V chord of the minor mode is also usually has a major third insted of minor because it leads to the first degree of the i chord.

dominant scales sound different because they don't have a leading tone
cdefgabc has a leading tone (b) but gabcdefg doesn't (f is a whole step away)
thatis why they sound different. they're also useful for improvising because you can play the seventh and it isn't too close to the root note
Last edited by eddievanzant at Jul 27, 2009,
#3
Quote by eddievanzant
i will try to help!
dominant means the 5th degree/note/chord of the ionian scale
it also is an adjective, a chord is dominant if it contains a flat seventh
so, in the ionian mode, the chords and theire sevenths are
cmaj7 dm7 em7 fmaj7 g7 am7 bhalfdiminshed

the second third fifth sixth and seventh all contain the dominant 7th
the second third fifth an sixth are usually called dominant
and the fifth one, the g7, is usually 'the' dominant chord
the fifth chord is the only major chord with a dominant seventh
it also has a tritone between the third and seventh degree, and the third and seventh are also leading tones to the first and third degrees of the I chord. the V chord of the minor mode is also usually has a major third insted of minor because it leads to the first degree of the i chord.

dominant scales sound different because they don't have a leading tone
cdefgabc has a leading tone (b) but gabcdefg doesn't (f is a whole step away)
thatis why they sound different. they're also useful for improvising because you can play the seventh and it isn't too close to the root note
In Cmaj7 the seventh degree is considered a "major 7," Dm7 Em7 and Am7 a "minor 7," and G7 a "dominant 7." The dominant 7 and minor 7 are technically the same thing, but they're considered the "minor 7" in a minor tetrad. Just a small discrepancy.
The degrees are as follows: Prime (root), minor 2nd, major 2nd, minor 3rd, major 3rd, perfect 4th, augmented 4th/diminished 5th (depending on context. Both are tritones), perfect 5th, augmented 5th/minor sixth (depending on context), major 6th/diminished 7th (depending on context), minor 7th (I'm not sure if they ever are considered the dominant 7th degree?), major 7th. Then beyond that are obviously the prime again, and then the extensions (minor 9th, major 9th, etc.).

Just to clear some stuff up (although I am not 100% sure about everything I said).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Well sort of. The dominant 7 is not the same as a minor seventh. A dominant 7 chord is a major triad with a minor seventh. They both contain the same type of seventh degree, but are pretty far from being similar.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.