#1
i recently started thinking about how cool it would be to convert some of the heavier classical music that is out there into a traditional song (made even heavier with distortion/effects. i couldnt find anything already posted about it so i thought i would ask and see if anyone had already tried doing this. so how about it?
#2
Ever heard of neoclassical music? It's been done. Quite a bit.

Hey guys! I just started playing electric guitar should I get a Gabson Lay Pall or a Femdor Startokaster. I like the picks on the gabsons but i like how sweet femdors look. Beforre i get a gabson what company makes them?
#3
Play it with high gain, Maybe turn some of the chords into porwechords, or arpeggiate. Just see what Yngwie or Uli Jon Roth do, but take ore nbote of uli jon roth
#4
Quote by ChurchNSkate
Ever heard of neoclassical music? It's been done. Quite a bit.

Look up yngwie malmsteen!
Ibanez Prestige RGA321SPB
#5
Quote by Capitalistklok
i recently started thinking about how cool it would be to convert some of the heavier classical music that is out there into a traditional song (made even heavier with distortion/effects. i couldnt find anything already posted about it so i thought i would ask and see if anyone had already tried doing this. so how about it?



Dude...where have you been ???

Blackmore was screwing with that stuff way back when

Neoclassical
Quote by JacobTheMe
JacobTheEdit: Hell yeah Ruben.

Quote by Jackal58
I met Jesus once. Cocksucker still owes me 20 bucks.
#7
I know that this one is cliched, but I started learning Beethoven's 5th. The main motif and the heavier passages are fabulous with a good distorted tone.
#9
I wonder if fantasia in D minor has been done on electric guitar. Thats the first classical song I was able to appreciate. Also, check out micheal romeo. (Edit: I was talking about Mozart)
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
Last edited by blueriver at Jul 27, 2009,
#10
Quote by ChurchNSkate
Ever heard of neoclassical music? It's been done. Quite a bit.


Neoclassical music =/= neoclassical rock
Neoclassicism in music was a movement in early 20th century music towards classical forms (e.g. Sonata form, Minuet and Trio etc.) or towards classical harmonies/phrase structures/melodic shapes. It didn't necessarily sound anything like music from the classical period.
I'm sure you're well aware of what neoclassical rock is.
#11
Quote by National_Anthem
Neoclassical music =/= neoclassical rock
Neoclassicism in music was a movement in early 20th century music towards classical forms (e.g. Sonata form, Minuet and Trio etc.) or towards classical harmonies/phrase structures/melodic shapes. It didn't necessarily sound anything like music from the classical period.
I'm sure you're well aware of what neoclassical rock is.

I can't thank you enough, I nearly started crying at previous posts.
Call me Batman.
#12
I think it would be interesting to convert baroque music into metal, can't say I really enjoy late classical - romantic, not to mention the instrumental differences between eras that would render baroque more viable for a metal setting (pretty sure Yngwie only does Bach esque stuff).
A metal version of Vivaldi's four seasons would be beast.....if done correctly that is.
lol guitar
#13
Quote by Serpentarius
I think it would be interesting to convert baroque music into metal, can't say I really enjoy late classical - romantic, not to mention the instrumental differences between eras that would render baroque more viable for a metal setting (pretty sure Yngwie only does Bach esque stuff).
A metal version of Vivaldi's four seasons would be beast.....if done correctly that is.


The power metal band At Vance 'covered' a few movements of the Four Seasons, as well as a couple of other famous classical pieces.
A samurai once asked Zen Master Hakuin where he would go after he died. Hakuin answered 'How am I supposed to know?'
'How do you not know? You're a Zen master!' exclaimed the samurai.
'Yes, but not a dead one,' Hakuin answered.
#14
This thread confuses me...

Most classical music is (at least partially) written with counterpoint. This means there will be more than one voice/melody at one time and each melody will act independently. By nature, rock is non-contrapuntal. I don't think a rock audience will like the sound of more than two voices and a classical audience wouldn't like the sound of distorted guitars and bleating drums.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#15
Quote by demonofthenight
This thread confuses me...

Most classical music is (at least partially) written with counterpoint. This means there will be more than one voice/melody at one time and each melody will act independently. By nature, rock is non-contrapuntal. I don't think a rock audience will like the sound of more than two voices and a classical audience wouldn't like the sound of distorted guitars and bleating drums.
/closeminded musical elitism

I'm sure there are classical fans who listen to rock and vice versa who would enjoy electric guitar renditions of various pieces
.