#1
So I'm am getting to use a Violin that is a family heirloom. I had a musical idea to make my songs more orchestral. so i get to use this. One problem, the bow is broken. It was a real horsehair bow, Should I Fix it and preserve the heirloom or get a new all horsehair bow. I
ve searchbarred and these vary Greatly in price. Why?
#2
I'm sorry but you should really try to find another forum more catered to violin players. This is Ultimate-Guitar..
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#3
If the bow isn't completely snapped in half it can be salvaged. What's wrong with it?

Bows vary in price for the same reason anything else does. Quality costs money.

A lot of this depends on how much this stuff is worth. Sentimental value aside, these "heirloom" violins usually turn out to be of rather poor quality and usually have issues that would cost too much to fix. A lot of the time they've been left unattended for years and are good for hanging on the wall but little else.
#4
Depends how damaged the bow is. If getting it re-haired is all you need then that's not a big deal. I know Shar Music has some really good bows if you need a new one, and they can deliver a bunch to you until you find one you like.
#5
Ik but I really don't want to take the time to sign up to another forum that hates on violin noobzors of which i will be, and a bunch of other stuff they make fun of the newbies have.
#6
Don't worry, I know there are a few people around here who are willing to help you with violin questions. What's wrong with the bow?
#7
Quote by Roc8995
If the bow isn't completely snapped in half it can be salvaged. What's wrong with it?

Bows vary in price for the same reason anything else does. Quality costs money.

A lot of this depends on how much this stuff is worth. Sentimental value aside, these "heirloom" violins usually turn out to be of rather poor quality and usually have issues that would cost too much to fix. A lot of the time they've been left unattended for years and are good for hanging on the wall but little else.


It was my great-grandfathers and he supposedly took great pride in it, the bow WAS snapped in half but the horsehair remains. It was given to my aunt who almost became an all-city violinist or something like that. so I assume it's decent.
#8
The bow's probably shot then. Horsehair isn't really a big deal on bows btw, most bows that aren't super cheap or kid's models are horsehair.

If you can afford it, you'll want to take the violin in to a luthier to get checked over. Weather often causes the seams to split or crack, and playing the instrument can cause more damage, especially if the sound post has gone or the bridge is warped.
#10
do you know the maker, brand, or markings of the violin in question, if you have it appraised, it might be REAL nice, then you may not want to use it, or maybe you will.

I suppose my curiosity has the best of me....
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#11
It has the best of me too, but my mom was the one who asked for it and, wel you know moms. to mothers a guitar is a guitar and so on and so forth.

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#14
Quote by maverick_137
It was my great-grandfathers and he supposedly took great pride in it, the bow WAS snapped in half but the horsehair remains. It was given to my aunt who almost became an all-city violinist or something like that. so I assume it's decent.
That bow should probably be repaired.

It likely won't stand up well to regular use
But if it's a family heirloom, it's worth restoring.
I'd recommend NOT attempting this yourself.
Either take it to a violin maker or if can't afford to right now, pack it away for now.
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#15
Roc is spot on. If the bow snapped, it's probably better, and not much more expensive, to buy a new one. A good bow shouldn't cost you more then 300$, the repair might cost you 150-200$ and afterwards you still have a cracked bow. The pressure that a bow has to carry during playing is quite high, so if the bow was fractured, its better to settle with a new one. I know no violin players that actually bother to repair the bow after it broke in half. A tiny fracture might repairable, but in my experience, that doesnt happen (due to the tensile strengths inflicted on it). Most bows, when fractured, snap in half immediatly.

I used a 300$ bow back when i played concerts and it was a very good bow. It suited my $10.000 violin without i ever had the feeling the bow was holding me back.
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Last edited by LP_CL at Jul 28, 2009,
#16
I know I'm definitely a uber noob when it comes to violins, but wouldn't the heirloom be the violin rather than the bow?

Or are they like a package deal... like guitars and pickups?
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#18
Just get a new one if it is snapped. The bow is definitely probably not the original one, as these things tend to break over time. Also, if you take your bow to a luthier who specializes in violins, and tell him it is a family heirloom, you are likely to get charged out the yang. It happens all the time. The violin itself is the valuable thing, bows can be replaced very easily.
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#19
In my opinion, if the bow's an heirloom then I'd wouldn't play it even if it was in good shape. It's more about the sentimental value. You'd best be off keeping it in a trophy case and buying a new bow, make sure the retailer can let you hold on to 10 different bows and play around with each of them until you can find one you like. If you have an instructor then get them to look at them too.