#1
I just wanted opinions on what area or parts of music thoery I should learn more about from here. I'm a bassist, but when I write songs, I write in all the instruments, and I can usually find something that not only fits, but compliments any line a guitarist thinks of. I know the intervals, I know the major and minor scales, how they're constructed, what makes a chord neutral, major, or minor, how to construct major and minor chords and scales, I understand key signatures, even if I don't like them, I know the cycle (the circle of fourths and fifths), and I want to know what else there is that I should work on. I play and write Punk, Grunge, Alternative, Post-Grunge, and Pop-Punk. So, what should I work on? I honestly think my understanding of what I've listed is solid enough that reviewing isn't going to help me too much.
#2
that is solid enough for most normal purposes without going into crazy detail

do you know how to use all those things properly/fully? if not work on that
Do you know how to use accidentals? or do you stick rigidly to sclaes?
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#4
learn when to use the modes, not just as iterations of the major or minor scale. also, practice with key changes within songs (modulations)
Æ
#5
study some counterpoint, that helps a lot when writing a part that is to be played with other instruments

get into some odd time signatures

get into a lot of jazz

etc.
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#6
Quote by doive
that is solid enough for most normal purposes without going into crazy detail

do you know how to use all those things properly/fully? if not work on that
Do you know how to use accidentals? or do you stick rigidly to sclaes?

I stick to scales when it fits, but prefer not to follow it religiously; I use them as a guide, not as a rule. However, I find them incredibly usefull when trying to find the right bass fills to add interest and to make a chord change smoother. And I'd say that I can make use of all the things practically, although of course I'm going to continue practicing it.
#8
Quote by bluethunder2512
learn when to use the modes, not just as iterations of the major or minor scale. also, practice with key changes within songs (modulations)

What's modes? I've had a friend explain it, but I honestly don't think he really knew what he was talking about. What I picked up from it is following a certain feel, not just scale, like using the right hammer-ons and pull-offs and timing and such to get the real middle-eastern sound to it, instead of just following a phygrian scale.

Quote by EZLN libertad
study some counterpoint, that helps a lot when writing a part that is to be played with other instruments

get into some odd time signatures

get into a lot of jazz

etc.

What's counterpoints?
#9
Quote by herby190
I just wanted opinions on what area or parts of music thoery I should learn more about from here. I'm a bassist, but when I write songs, I write in all the instruments, and I can usually find something that not only fits, but compliments any line a guitarist thinks of. I know the intervals, I know the major and minor scales, how they're constructed, what makes a chord neutral, major, or minor, how to construct major and minor chords and scales, I understand key signatures, even if I don't like them, I know the cycle (the circle of fourths and fifths), and I want to know what else there is that I should work on. I play and write Punk, Grunge, Alternative, Post-Grunge, and Pop-Punk. So, what should I work on? I honestly think my understanding of what I've listed is solid enough that reviewing isn't going to help me too much.



I can't tell you exactly where to go from here, I can only tell you that there is always more to learn. keep your ears and mind open.

PS.... you might consider getting a book where all the ideas are organized rather than trying to put together random bits of advice and opinions found on the internet. This is especially important for someone at your level. Once you've gotten to a certain point (a solid grasp on the fundamentals), you'll get alot more out of the info you can find online.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 28, 2009,
#10
Quote by GuitarMunky
I can't tell you exactly where to go from here, I can only tell you that there is always more to learn. keep your ears and mind open.

I was just hoping for some advice on what to do, although the last sentance is good advice. I plan on keeping my mind open; I'm really interested in music thoery, but honestly don't think I'll be able to afford lessons (although I can hopefully be in jazz band in high school, so that should help), so I wanted to ask people here on what they think would be useful or if there's anything vital I'm missing.
#11
^
. you might consider getting a book where all the ideas are organized rather than trying to put together random bits of advice and opinions found on the internet. This is especially important for someone at your level. Once you've gotten to a certain point (a solid grasp on the fundamentals), you'll get alot more out of the info you can find online.

Also, you say you can't afford lessons. I would seriously consider trying to find a way to afford them.

PS: My experience with jazz band was that I got experience reading chord charts.... but I didn't learn anything about jazz itself from a theory/application perspective. Some schools may be different, but the 4 or 5 different jazz bands I've been in have all been like that.

You're given charts, but not instructions. Might want to deal with that ahead of time, like with a teacher, so you can get more out of jazz band.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 28, 2009,
#12
Quote by herby190
What's modes? I've had a friend explain it, but I honestly don't think he really knew what he was talking about. What I picked up from it is following a certain feel, not just scale, like using the right hammer-ons and pull-offs and timing and such to get the real middle-eastern sound to it, instead of just following a phygrian scale.


What's counterpoints?


Piano will help you with that.
He meant counterpoint melodies. Solos and most melodic lines do this. It means to play something harmonious with the harmony section (duh), while they are both being played at with different rhythmic accents. I might be wrong, but that's what I've understood from how people explained it to me.

Here, try this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0pddQEVTzc&feature=related
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
^
. you might consider getting a book where all the ideas are organized rather than trying to put together random bits of advice and opinions found on the internet. This is especially important for someone at your level. Once you've gotten to a certain point (a solid grasp on the fundamentals), you'll get alot more out of the info you can find online.

Also, you say you can't afford lessons. I would seriously consider trying to find a way to afford them.

Any recommendations on a book? If you know a specific one or a certain author or something, that would be helpful; otherwise, I'll just search up music thoery next time I'm at the library.
#14
Quote by herby190
Any recommendations on a book? If you know a specific one or a certain author or something, that would be helpful; otherwise, I'll just search up music thoery next time I'm at the library.



I've heard good things about this book...

http://www.amazon.com/Music-Theory-Dummies-Michael-Pilhofer/dp/0764578383/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

and actually I've seen it at my local library. I just looked through it quickly. Seemed to be a good book.
shred is gaudy music
#15
Quote by huevos
Piano will help you with that.
He meant counterpoint melodies. Solos and most melodic lines do this. It means to play something harmonious with the harmony section (duh), while they are both being played at with different rhythmic accents. I might be wrong, but that's what I've understood from how people explained it to me.

Here, try this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0pddQEVTzc&feature=related

Oh, I see what you mean. When I think of that, the first thing that comes to mind is Reptilia by The Strokes, especially the chorus. This advice actually came at the perfect time; one of my two bands recently added a second guitarist, meaning I can now write more complex and layored music than normal, so counterpoints will begin meaning more and more.
#16
Look into voice leading. Voice leading describes how chords interact melodically (even though you play bass you still have a role in the chords and the voice leading!). It helps you understand how the same progression using different shapes can sound so different. It also allows you to pick extensions for chords more skillfully.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#17
Personally I think the best thing you can do is learn all the notes on the fretboard and how they interact with each other.

When your guitarist says he wants an evil sounding bass line to go along with his riff or progression that's in the key of, say.. Em, would you know which notes to choose to add to the effect?

Even though bass players don't need to play chords doesn't mean they shouldn't learn about them.
#18
Quote by Ssargentslayer
Personally I think the best thing you can do is learn all the notes on the fretboard and how they interact with each other.

When your guitarist says he wants an evil sounding bass line to go along with his riff or progression that's in the key of, say.. Em, would you know which notes to choose to add to the effect?

Even though bass players don't need to play chords doesn't mean they shouldn't learn about them.

Well, I know all the notes on the fretboard by heart, including the ones on the top two strings of a guitar, and I understand intervals. As for evil sounds, I'd probably just try a walk up using minor intervals and tritones based off of the E, although the line would obviously be individual to the riff itself.