#1
Hey guys

So I've been playing guitar about 3 years now, and am ready to move onto another step now in my playing.

I've pretty much got chords and powerchords and all the basic stuff down to a fairly competent level considering the amount of time I've been playing, but I want MORE!

So my question is, what's the best way to pick up the techniques/skills needed to be able to solo like crazy? you know the kinda thing I mean, the classic old school stuff, Metallica, Slayer, Megadeth etc.

Basically I really want to learn how to pull off these solos, but I'm not really sure where to start...

I see those numbers floating around in tabs, I see some whiz kid whacking it out on youtube, but have no idea how to even think about getting started at playing such solos myself. So what do you reckon? How do I get starting down that road?

Thanks guys! Any help will be greatly appreciated!

-Laura-
#2
My suggestion is to download the program Powertab and Slow the tempo down of a song and slowly build up the skill in playing the solo. Thats what i did for the fade to black intro arpeggiated part and for symphony of destruction b4 i gave up on that one.! it helps alot
#3
You mean you still can't play those solo's after 3 years?
Turtles R awesome. dont agree? YOU GO TO HELL, YOU GO TO HELL AND YOU DIE!


PSN: Purple-munky

Gear...
Ion - acoustic guitar.
Cort KX1Q - i smashed it
Fender Super Champ XD 15w
Stagg G-310 - i smashed it.
#4
damn man, i've been playing for only 7 months and i got both the solos of fade to black as well as the first two solos to sanitarium down
#5
Don't give the guy a hard time. Last time I checked the majority of slayer's solos were well over 200 bpmm primarily 16ths notes, with short bursts faster than that. It is one thing to fudge your way through with so much distortion you can't hear what you're doing, not truly locked in, it's totally another to pull it off convincingly. Some of their solos are kind of rehashed, but you've got to give it to them, both guitarists are very tight (especially Hanneman) , and the solos work well for the songs.

As far as working towards that goes - same as everything else - there's nothing really "advanced" about it - it's down to having the basics down really tight. Having solid alternate picking, getting your hands really synched up, good muting, bends, strength and flexibility in your fingers, good economy of motion, minimal tension. The usual stuff. In other words, lots of practice. And approaching the whole thing with patience and focus. Think about it like building a house. The more sturdy the foundation (mastering the techniques), the better the house will hold up in a storm (playing fast). You don't necessarily build the foundation in the middle of a storm (when practicing focus on how well you are solidifying your technique, not on how fast you are playing).
#6
Get Guitar Pro, be it legally or not so legally. If you do get it ilegally make sure it's got RSE packs.

Download the Guitar Pro tab for the song you want to learn. Skip straight to the solos, play it through and listen to it a few times.
Listen to the actual song a few times.

Repeat until you know the solo like the **** on your arse hairs. You know how the solo goes, the phrases etc.

Then you look at the notes for the solo. Learn it bit by bit example 2 bars at a time.
Look at the fret numbers for the those 2 bars.
Let's pretend the fret numbers are 11 13 15 10
You must find the lowest and highest fret.
Assign your index finger to the Lowest (closest to nut) fret and your little finger to the highest fret.
Anything in the middle will be handled by your other 2.

Practice it very slow until you know the pattern and don't need to read the tab while playing.
Then you just repeat the pattern as much as possible until it's muscle memory and your speed drastically starts to increase.

Final step, get ready for the FULL METAL ONSLAUGHT as you ram out 16th note sweeps and over neck tapping and dangerous alternate picking.

You can alter the solos to make them easier too, example turning hard fast parts into 2 string arpeggios.

If you need help message me.
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.
#7
Guys, everyone learns at different speeds. Dont give him a hard time.
Been away, am back
#8
Quote by Logz
Guys, everyone learns at different speeds. Dont give him a hard time.


Yeah, BB Kings been playing for over 60 years and he probably couldn't play any harder Metallica than the first MOP or the Nothing Else Matters solo.

For all we know, OP could be a genious blues musician or something.
#9
Also, not everyone practices 5 hours a day.
I'm happy when I can get two hours.

Quote by dNWaKE
damn man, i've been playing for only 7 months and i got both the solos of fade to black as well as the first two solos to sanitarium down


Edit: I'm also about 7 months in and I can't play those solos. I can play Fear of the Dark, no solos and Crazy Train, no solos on my acoustic
Quote by Kumanji
The only thing that matters in music these days is money - genuinely talented artists are passed over entirely or corraled into making non-offensive, non-threatening average music that sells.
Last edited by zomghax at Jul 29, 2009,
#10
Hey guys, thanks for all your help.

Seems like a lot of you are saying 'study the basics' - but what are the basics? Scales and stuff? Any links to good fingering exercises (steady...) I should try?

As for the method of going through the tab, picking out a bit and then just doing it over and over real slow, does that actually work? I've tried it a little, but not enough to get any results I guess, I just felt like I was going nowhere.

For instance most of the time I look up a solo, see the tab saying something like 5---12---7---21 or whatever, and it just seems insanely out of reach, like I would have no idea how to play that realistically.

Thanks again for the help guys

-Laura

p.s. sorry to disappoint, but I'm not b.b.king. I'm that knob with the beanie from U2.
#11
That is something you would tap with your right hand.

Or you would play:

E------12-------21------------------------
B--10--------------------------------------
G-----------18-----------------------------

You don't have to stick to the tab
#12
If you want to be able to play fast you need good dexterity in all of you fingers!! Thats what im doing just now.

Forget about playing MOP or whatever and learn the church modes -

http://www.guitarbasics.com/theory/chap2_lesson1.htm

learn these off by heart, slowly playing them, (as someone else said muscle memory and all that jazz.)

when you can play them without the music all the way through, 1st to 7th then work on your speed! Use EVERY finger! Especially your ring and pinkie!! Another thing to do is hammer-on, pull-off the frets using your fore finger through to your pinkie up the neck then moving up one and using your middle finger ---> pinkie and finally
your ring finger and pinkie

This sounds laborious and boring but practice makes perfect!

If you do this everyday before you play, slowly increasing your speed the muscle in your arm which controls your finger movement gets bigger and stronger - making your fingers easier to move and faster! After a week or so (if you play everyday for an hour) you will be busting out solos like mustaine and hammett no probs!
#13
I don't get that diagram at ALL. It's just a bunch of numbers on a mystery part of the fretboard? How the hell do you read that?
#14
id say that if youve been playing three years, that you have the basics down, but just because you have the basics doesnt mean you have speed. so go to the lessons, hit correct practice of techniques or something. go through the speed building stuff twenty minutes a day. after a few weeks of that you can start learning a solo. pick one out read the tab, and if the tab doesnt seem right (which most arent)
then listen to the part that is off and whether by recorder or computer program slow it down listen to the part that is off and make the changes.

always remember to learn it one riff or bar at a time, and if its too fast at first, just play it really slowly, making sure you dont make one mistake, and slowly speed the tempo to normal
your imagination is only as colorful as the drugs you are on


#16
there is a music player called the amazing slow downer where you can listen to the song at any speed you want. I use it when learning solos along with the tabs so I can get the rhythm down. Then I try to play along and keep increasing the speed.
#17
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
Yeah, BB Kings been playing for over 60 years and he probably couldn't play any harder Metallica than the first MOP or the Nothing Else Matters solo.


But why would B.B. King even attempt to play such music. it's totally out of his element. :S

And he doesn't play chords.

@ Topic-Take things SLOWLLLLYYYYY. Once you can play the solo all slow-like, try attempting it faster and faster. A metronome or various programs should help you out very much so.
#18
Quote by Hamkins
So my question is, what's the best way to pick up the techniques/skills needed to be able to solo like crazy? you know the kinda thing I mean, the classic old school stuff, Metallica, Slayer, Megadeth etc.

Basically I really want to learn how to pull off these solos, but I'm not really sure where to start...

I see those numbers floating around in tabs, I see some whiz kid whacking it out on youtube, but have no idea how to even think about getting started at playing such solos myself. So what do you reckon? How do I get starting down that road?
First off, ignore modes for now. Don't even think about them. You don't need them yet (in fact you may never need them), and until you really understand the major scale inside out they won't make much sense, and will just complicate matters.

Second thing - tabs on here are transcribed by normal people, like you and me - they are not infallible. A lot of the time, if a tab looks impossible to play, its probably been tabbed wrong, so either find another version or see if theres an easier way to play it.

Don't worry about speed either. Don't try and play fast - focus on playing cleanly and accurately. Speed is like a byproduct of accuracy, coordination between your fretting and picking hands, and economy of motion. Get those things sorted and you'll speed up naturally, and still play cleanly.

To start off playing solos pick an easy one - or at least one with an easy rhythm, listen to it a shedload (and I mean a shedload - I've got tracks on my ipod with like 150 plays just from listening to the solo on repeat . You need to know what its meant to sound like if you want to be able to play it - get it ingrained in your brain.

When you get the tab, break the solo down into phrases. Start as slow as you need to and focus on a phrase at a time. If a phrase is too much break it down into individual licks, then build it back up again as you get the licks nailed.

As long as you understand the rhythm, and there's no techniques that are out of your reach, then you should be able to have a go at a pretty large range of solos - just don't worry about speed. Go as slow as you need to play it cleanly and accurately.

As far as scales go, I'd start with the major scale. If you really understand the major scale in terms of notes and intervals you've broken the back of scales right there. Pretty much every other scale you'll ever need can be derived from the major scale. Learn it all over the neck, and learn how to play it in every key. Once you know it, practice it single string, 2 notes per string, 3 notes per string, alt picked and legato, and in different patterns.

Alongside that, its probably worth learning to play the minor and major pentatonic scales, as they are used a lot in solos. I'd focus on understanding the major scale before you try and understand how they are constructed though.

Once you understand the major scale, learn how the natural minor is related to it, and how the pentatonics are derived from the major and minor scales, and how they are related. That way you'll see how they all fit together, rather than trying to learn them all independently.

Most of all though, don't forget to have fun!