#1
I have 5-6 different patch cords. Some have a very thin cord, some are thick, some short, some long. Does the actual patch cord make a difference in your tone? I haven't noticed anything, but i want to know what you guys think. Does it really matter what kind of patch you use?
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Guitars -
Epiphone Zakk Wylde Custom (Aged Ivory Bullseye)
Jackson DXMG Dinky

Amps etc. -
Line 6 Pod X3 Live w/ speaker system
Marshall MG15DFX Practice Amp
#2
Yes, let me find the link.

http://www.protonepedals.com/TamingHighGainDistortionNoise.pdf

It's somewhere in there.

Why are you plugging your $1000 guitar into your
$1500 amp with a $9 cable? And DO NOT get me
started on those $3 patch cables you're using in
between each pedal on your board. C'mon guys... your
cables are essential to your tone, so skimp someplace
else.
Our good friend Mark Stoddard over at Lava Cable
chimes in with this angle:
"Noise or microphonics is caused by cable movement or
contact as small voltages are generated from this that
interrupt the signal path. If the cable does not have the
correct amount or type shielding the noise will be
greater. Also, the lower in capacitance a cable is, the
easier the noise will be heard as more signal is passed.
Typically, with static cable such as pedal jumpers noise
is not an issue as there's no movement. It's important
for cable jumpers to be solidly built as a loose solder
connection or loose solder-free connection can cause
noise when the pedal or cable is moved."
Mark lays out some good info, lets expand on it a bitpedal
jumpers or patch cables actually take some serious abuse if you're a heavy footed pedal user. Every
time you're stepping on the switch you're causing that
whole unit it shift, unless you're using mounting screws
to keep your pedals on your board, and that slight shift
with each stomp causes your patch cables to move and
flex as well. So each time you engage your boost pedal
for a solo, let’s say once per song multiplied by 10
songs a set, that’s 20 stomps... that can add up to
some sizable movement over the course of the evening,
not to mention the amount of movement being seen by
your primary cable, the one connecting your guitar to
your pedal board. So you want to be sure that these are
well constructed.
The other topic Mark touched on is capacitance. Over at
Lava Cables' web site they have a great write up on
capacitance, and cables in general, I encourage you to
check it out. But in a nut shell, capacitance sucks the
high end out of your signal, the longer the cable the
higher the capacitance, which is why 40 foot cables
sound dark and muddy. So, stick to the correct cable
length. If you're a bedroom rocker, a couple of 5-8 foot
cables are probably all you need. If you're gigging try
12-15 footers, they'll probably do you well for most venues.


That part.
Last edited by CrimsonBizzare at Jul 29, 2009,
#3
in general, a bad cable or a cable that's too long can change the tone, and add noise to the line.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


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#4
I wasn't aware Thank you. I've been using some bigger cables lately because the old thin ones would break quickly (the ends would snap off)
------
Guitars -
Epiphone Zakk Wylde Custom (Aged Ivory Bullseye)
Jackson DXMG Dinky

Amps etc. -
Line 6 Pod X3 Live w/ speaker system
Marshall MG15DFX Practice Amp
#6
Yes they can have an affect on your tone. There are good ones and there are cheap ones. Just like longer ones used to connect your guitar. Doesnt do much good to buy expensive cables for everything else and use the cheap ones between your pedals. I didnt really think there was much of a difference. I had swapped all my old cheap ones out for mogami and georgeLs. Then 1 day I was looking for a problem and using an older cheap cable I knew still worked found my break but didnt have alot of volume. I adjusted everything to get my volume back then swapped the cheap cable back out and my volume jumped back up. Yea that cable worked but it was sucking alot of tone and volume.
#7
Just make "home-made" cables like this guy does. =D Lol
(only sometimes, though)
#8
Not related to tone, but I also find that if you go for longer cables than you realy need, they just get all tangled and broken despite my best efforts
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#10
Quote by turtlewax
Not related to tone, but I also find that if you go for longer cables than you realy need, they just get all tangled and broken despite my best efforts



there are some cable just wont stay untangled.
and some longer ones never kink.

i've got a great tweed cable i love the look at the sound quality, but i wont use it because it's always in a knot.
you live and learn.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011