#1
I know that you would play an E minor scale over an E minor chord, but a friend told me you could also use A minor? How does that work? And if I am playing, for example, F Mixolydian, there is no F Mixolydian chord, so what would I use?
#2
The chord E minor is in the key of A minor.
E minor chord : E G B
A minor scale : A B C D E F G

Therefore you could use A minor over E minor if you were in the key of A minor - this would be determined by the other chords in the progression. EG: Am, G, Em, F would be a chord progression in A minor as all those chords use the notes contained in that scale. Therefore the logical choice over the whole progression including the Em would be A minor.

You could use F mixolydian (or Bb major) over an F dominant 7th chord.
F7: F A C Eb
F mixolydian: F G A Bb C D Eb
Bb major: Bb C D Eb F G A

There are loads of threads and other sources on the net for theory like this.
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Last edited by pEdAl2 at Jul 29, 2009,
#3
I'm no expert and may be wrong but: generally your soloing over a progression, and E is in the A minor scale (it's the 5th degree). Depending on the rest of the progression, you may or not be able to solo with that, however, if you are only playing the E minor, you could theoretically use any degree in the scale E minor to solo over the chord. But E Minor would be most effective.
#4
Quote by pEdAl2
The chord E minor is in the key of A minor.
E minor chord : E G B
A minor scale : A B C D E F G

Therefore you could use A minor over E minor if you were in the key of A minor - this would be determined by the other chords in the progression. EG: Am, G, Em, F would be a chord progression in A minor as all those chords use the notes contained in that scale. Therefore the logical choice over the whole progression including the Em would be A minor.

You could use F mixolydian (or Bb major) over an F dominant 7th chord.
F7: F A C Eb
F mixolydian: F G A Bb C D Eb

There are loads of threads and other sources on the net for theory like this.


But how did you figure out that F dominant 7th goes beneath F Mixolydian?
#5
In the key of C major

C major
D minor
E minor
F major
G major
A Minor
B Diminished (Don't worry about this one for now)

Now remember that pattern. M m m M M m D

Your friend is correct only because both of those chords contain the notes that fit in the E minor scale and A minor.

All you have to do is match the notes in the chords to the appropriate scale...

E minor- E B G
E minor scale E F# G A B C D
A minor scale A B C D E F G

As you can see both scale contain the notes E B G therefor they both sound "right" over that chord.

But please look at the theory sticky and around UG before asking a question that has been answered many times
#6
Quote by GoIrish668
But how did you figure out that F dominant 7th goes beneath F Mixolydian?

Please do not worry about modes. You probably wont use or see them for a long time. Learn how to use basic major and minor scales first.
#7
Thank you, you have saved me from going crazy over what it means and then jumping off a cliff to my death. Actually, I'll probably do that anyway.
#8
If we're talking playing modal music and you were playing A minor over an E minor chord, you'd be playing E phrygian. Mixoloydian and alterations thereof are often used over dominant chords.
Quote by thsrayas
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#9
Quote by 7even
If we're talking playing modal music and you were playing A minor over an E minor chord, you'd be playing E phrygian. Mixoloydian and alterations thereof are often used over dominant chords.

Please ignore this whole post.


Stop trying to act smart and confuse the guy.
#10
Quote by Ssargentslayer
Please ignore this whole post.


Stop trying to act smart and confuse the guy.

What are you talking about? He asked a question and i answered. I agree that he shouldn't be worrying about modes but being curious and asking questions should be allowed.

Stop acting like a MT elitist.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#11
Quote by 7even
What are you talking about? He asked a question and i answered. I agree that he shouldn't be worrying about modes but being curious and asking questions should be allowed.

Stop acting like a MT elitist.

He was already clearly confused with major and minor chords and scales and you come in here and throw modes, dominant chords and alterations at him.
Do you think he's going to understand anything of what you said?
Do you think you post helped him at all?

It's like asking how cookies are made. I only want to know the recipe not how to make the chocolate chips or how to grow the wheat or anything like that.
#12
I agree that he shouldn't be worrying about modes yet, but i just find it very rude to completely discard his original question because you think his theoretical knowledge is too limited to understand the answer. He asked if a thing as a mixolydian chord existed which i clearly answered and now don't have to worry about.

Nevertheless i think we've gotten your point through by now, and I'm ready to rest my case.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#13
Quote by GoIrish668
I know that you would play an E minor scale over an E minor chord, but a friend told me you could also use A minor? How does that work? And if I am playing, for example, F Mixolydian, there is no F Mixolydian chord, so what would I use?



In general its nice to think of it this way: if the notes of the chord are not present or in harmony with a given chord either by relative minor, major, or in actuality members of the scale, it is a SAFE BET to assume the two are incompatible.
#14
Quote by GoIrish668
Thank you, you have saved me from going crazy over what it means and then jumping off a cliff to my death. Actually, I'll probably do that anyway.
Learn the major scale inside out before you worry about understanding any other scales. You can derive pretty much every other scale you'll ever need (including modes) from the major scale. Understand how to construct the major scale out of intervals and notes, then learn to harmonise it. Then you'll be able to fit the major scale to diatonic chord progressions (that is, chord progressions that stay in one key)

Once you understand the major scale and are really comfortable with it look at how the natural minor scale and pentatonic scales are related to it.

Once you've done all that, and are comfortable with it, then is the time to look at modes if you want too - they should be relatively easy to make sense of then. Until then, trying to understand modes will just make your brain want to explode.

Edit: Use the other scales you know while your doing that lot, but don't worry too much about understanding them until you understand the step before them
Last edited by zhilla at Jul 29, 2009,