#1
So anyway, 3rd string on my guitar has been acting up lately, and I noticed that the 4th fret harmonic doesn't match the open B string, which it should because that's how people typically tune their guitar. Can anyone explain?
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#2
The harmonic? I though fretted and played a the 4th fret it's a B note.
Quote by Kumanji
The only thing that matters in music these days is money - genuinely talented artists are passed over entirely or corraled into making non-offensive, non-threatening average music that sells.
#4
have you had it intonated lately?tune it up as perfect as you can. then check the 12th fret to the open of each string. if theyr'e alot sharp or alot flat then thats probably what is wrong. consult the set up thread that is stickied if you need to or just google intonate a guitar.

good luck man.
#5
The 4th fret harmonic on the G is not a B note. Use the 7th fret harmonic on the low E - it makes the same note as the open B string.
~3.6 billion years of evolutionary progress have led to this post~
#7
Quote by David Collins
I believe he's referring to the 4th fret harmonic not agreeing with the 5th fret harmonic on the B string (or being 2 octaves above unison with the open b).

Welcome to the world of equal temperament. No they're not in tune, nor are they supposed to be. If each string is perfectly in tune to equal temperament, the 4th fret harmonic on the G (major third harmonic) will be about 14¢ flat from the 5th fret harmonic on the B (2nd octave harmonic). And for the record, the 7th fret harmonics (major 5th harmonics) we so often use for tuning are about 2¢ sharp from equal temperament, in theory anyway, but this is generally small enough to go unnoticed.

It's the way that it is. Guitars don't play in tune - never have, never will.

This is what I meant, and thanks for your explanation.
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010