#1
I've been trying to learn music theory, and I've been reading about chords in certain keys. I know all the basics, the chords in the key of C Major is C Dm Em F G Am Bdim, and can likewise identify all the chords of any specific Major key you throw at me. But onto the question, I've noticed a few songs that consist of only major chords, and don't fit into any of the major keys. Are there some keys which only have Major chords in them? Or are these songs simply constantly switching keys?
#2
Quote by Riffdex
I've been trying to learn music theory, and I've been reading about chords in certain keys. I know all the basics, the chords in the key of C Major is C Dm Em F G Am Bdim, and can likewise identify all the chords of any specific Major key you throw at me. But onto the question, I've noticed a few songs that consist of only major chords, and don't fit into any of the major keys. Are there some keys which only have Major chords in them? Or are these songs simply constantly switching keys?


It's because they play progressions like I-IV-V for example which consists only of major chords.
Last edited by symba05 at Jul 29, 2009,
#3
Quote by Riffdex
Or are these songs simply constantly switching keys?

Not so much switching keys but more like borrowing the occasional note from another key to make something sound more interesting from time to time. Or it could just be a I IV V progression.
#4
Not all progressions will be in key. When you learn more about theory you'll be able to identify why the out of key note is appropriate, but until then regard as a simple out of key note. =D
i don't know why i feel so dry
#5
^ as mentioned above...... borrowed chords, modulations....

A piece of music doesn't have to be confined to one key.
shred is gaudy music
#6
well the song I was mainly referring to isn't a simple 1-4-5 progression

It goes E E D E
then goes to F# A F# E

I guess it's in the key of A Major, and the artist substituted a F# Major instead of F#m as the key called for
#7
Nah, it's in E Major. The D Major is an out of key chord that is borrowed from the parallel minor (that is, borrowed from E minor). It's also not uncommon to raise the second chord in a major key (in this case, F# minor) to a a major chord, so that explains the F# Major.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#8
A lot of songs use the major II(7) chord. Basically a borrowed chord from the key of the V, it's a secondary dominant. i.e. C D G F C would be a I - II - V - IV - I progression, where they're all major and the D is a borrowed V chord from the key of G.