#1
okay. i love my 65 reissue deluxe reverb. it sounds great. but i am thinking of selling it for a 70's silverface bandmaster (with matching 2x12 cab)

i played through it today with my pedals and it adds such a nice vintage tone to everything.

my only concern is that i'm worried that maintaining it could be difficult. and i was also wondering if running lots of fuzz pedals and gadgets into might hurt it?

here's pix btw

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#3
the circuits were simpler and handwired back then, so a good tech will know his way around it easy enough. but hitch is that it is, most likely, from the 70's, so parts like tubes/capacitors/resistors/speakers might be in not-so-good shape. this is the pitfall of getting old used gear.

the question you need to ask yourself when buying instruments of collectibility is: "Am i buying this as a relic or collector's piece, or am i buying it to play." if you are buying it to play then it gets complicated, because while you're buying this amp for it's era authenticity and the sound associated to it, you will need to change/repair particular components(usually caps, but commonly the tubes need replacing, and sometimes a speaker goes out, etc.) in order to have a reliable enough amp to gig with. this changing of parts kinda undermines the idea of getting an authentic amp from a particular era.

i have been purchasing amplifiers from bygone era recently, and generally what i do i find a good reputable amp tech, have him go through the amp for a diagnostic. replace components for reliability purposes and keep the old components for your records, so that way you keep all original components for someone who may acquire it in the future and may be interested in just collectibility. also, when replacing parts, i try and find manufacturers that make old parts to ancient specs that are no longer available, i also try and get NOS parts. this way the amp will sound closer to it's original sound as well as make the amp more reliable.

i find it as kinda a responsibility as a vintage instrument owner to know as much about my equipment, and to keep the originality of the instrument as much intact as possible, because when these things are gone, much knowledge of them will be gone too.

so that breaks down the realistic challenges of using vintage equipment down to classic moral dillemas from using vintage equipment.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Jul 29, 2009,
#4
the seller told me everything is up to date on it, and showed me the tubes and such. its rebiased and re-tubed. not sure about the cab

thanks for the informative post. much appreciated
#5
if he has replaced anything, ask him if he has the old parts still floating around, these are very desirable. usually they don't but it is worth a try
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#6
Quote by gumbilicious
if he has replaced anything, ask him if he has the old parts still floating around, these are very desirable. usually they don't but it is worth a try



will do. good idea.
#7
Running lots of pedals and gadgets won't hurt any amp but if you run it flat out and overdrive it heaps, specially with lots of bass, you could blow a speaker. Depends.