#1
I'm searching for what would be the maximum range (in Hertz) of a 24 fret guitar. I know that the lower E is around 82hz and I'd like to know would be the highest sound.
Sorryz for me bad engrish.

Quote by OnlyIbanez12
I just cut myself shaving my pubes...
#2
well provided you're staying on the fretboard, on a 24 fret guitar, from that low E you can get four octave higher at the 24th fret on the high E string, so 82*2^4 = 1312hz

buuuuut, you can play artifical harmonics and go...well...as high as you want really (maybe another 2 octaves if you're really crafty....refer to Mattias IA Eklund for this )
#3
In A 440 and standard tuning, it's 82.4 to 1318.5.

In C 256 and standard tuning, it's 80.6 to 1290.2.
#4
up one octave exactly double the frequency. since a guitar has ~4 octave you need to multiply it by 2 four times

82*2*2*2*2= 1300Hz

as a reference to make the numbers mean something human hearing goes from roughly 20-20000Hz that is 4 octaves lower and 4 octaves higher. (interesting i never noticed out of the 12 audible octaves the guitar exactly the middle 4)
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#5
^ 20Hz is 2 octaves lower than 80Hz, and the number of audible octaves is closer to 10

In theory, when you play any note on the guitar, harmonics that are well over 20kHz will be present.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Jul 30, 2009,
#6
Quote by Ænimus Prime
^ 20Hz is 2 octaves lower than 80Hz, and the number of audible octaves is closer to 10

In theory, when you play any note on the guitar, harmonics that are well over 20kHz will be present.


you're totally right - i had a dead brain moment :p
i thought it was odd i'd not noticed the centrality of the guitars range before now...
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#7
Quote by Ænimus Prime
^ 20Hz is 2 octaves lower than 80Hz, and the number of audible octaves is closer to 10

In theory, when you play any note on the guitar, harmonics that are well over 20kHz will be present.


except that speakers in guitar amps can't reproduce crap at above 7khz or so

that and I never had any luck hitting the harmonics above the 9th or 10th one on an open string
#8
You might not be able to hit them and an amp might not be able to reproduce them but when you pluck a string theres the fundamental and a bunch of overtones that you hear and more that you don't hear.

The relative strength of the overtones are what makes a guitar sound different to a flute.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
Quote by Ænimus Prime
You might not be able to hit them and an amp might not be able to reproduce them but when you pluck a string theres the fundamental and a bunch of overtones that you hear and more that you don't hear.

The relative strength of the overtones are what makes a guitar sound different to a flute.


I actually never thought about this but I would imagine that the amp itself, like you said, may have a HUGE effect on the hz range for the guitar. In theory, if you eliminated the excess frequencies I think you could eliminate static from the recording. Might be useful if you have a ****ty amp... What do you think?
#10
well yes, but if you got rid of all the overtones you would just sound like an old mobile phone ring tone. The reason they sound so crap is because of a total lack of overtones.

Static is totally different from overtones and harmonics etc. static is where random unwanted electromagnetic intereference interacts with your sound, either adding or removing random bits of signal. Good recording techniques, well built equipment an properly shielded wiring can all reduce these effects without interfering with the sound of your guitar.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#11
In effect though, the guitar's signal is a sawtooth wave. All the frequencies stated are for sine waves. Therefore (by the theory of Fourier Series), there have to be an infinite number of additional sine waves of varying frequencies and amplitudes present in the signal...

Also, thats pretty much what distortion is isnt it (clipping the signal, i.e. adding additional signals)? All other guitar effects could also be treated in the same manner...
Quote by jpnyc
You are what they call a “rhythm guitarist”. While it's not as glamorous as playing lead you can still get laid. Especially if you can sing and play.




Beer is the solutions to the world's problems.