#1
Alright,

The Trainwreck is currently on hold as I'll be headed back to university in the next few weeks, and I need an amp that won't make my ears bleed if a wire moves. I'm planning on redoing the layout for the Trainwreck anyway, Ken got lazy in a few spots and I think it would be more stable with some changes i'm thinking of.

That all being said, my Delta Blues will be a little loud for the dorm room. So here are my plans for the amp.

5F1 circuit
Mojo Tone Chassis
Mojo Tone Transformers
Sprague Atom Electrolytic Caps
Carbon Composition Resistors (I've never used these and seeing as how this amp is quite simple I don't feel like they should add too much noise)
Alessandro Foil-in-oil Capacitors (I doubt they will make a huge difference to the tone of the amp, but I have a bit of extra money and since I only need two i'll eat the cost)
Alpha Pots (I've never had a problem with them, so this may be the only "cheap" part of the build)

For Tubes I will be using some of the tubes that came out of the Brown Deluxe that was completely fried. The tubes are good, and sound quite good in my Trainwreck when she behaves herself. So the Power tube will be a Sylvannia 6v6, and I am unsure of the brand of the preamp tubes as they have long since had their writing rubbed off.

Anyone have any suggestions for mods, I'd rather not drill too many holes in the chassis as I do not have a drill press.
#2
Unfortunately, both of my suggestions involve more holes in the chassis:

- standby switch
- tone control on a push-pull so that it can be lifted from the circuit.
#3
Quote by cedricsmods
Unfortunately, both of my suggestions involve more holes in the chassis:

- standby switch
- tone control on a push-pull so that it can be lifted from the circuit.


I'm going to keep the tube rectifier, just because there is already a hole there, so there should not be a need for a standby switch.

As far as a tone control, I tend to mess around with the tone knobs on my guitars quite a bit so I don't think i'll need a tone control on the amp, I may change my mind before tomorrow and order a princeton chassis though, which would allow me to include a tone control.
#4
Ordered Parts today from a few sources.

The place I order tubes from did not have a 5Y3. I have two 5AR4 tubes (GZ34) that i'm thinking about using. The current for the 5V taps is slightly lower with a GZ34, but the voltage drop is 23 volts less. I don't see this being a problem, but does anyone else think this might be?
#5
I've got the amp working, and these are the best pictures that I could get. I don't have much of a recording set up, but one of the guys that I will be living with at the university does. I will try to get a few clips up with my crappy mic though.

The pictures are also somewhat crappy, but I will try to get better ones soon.



The wiring got a bit sloppy towards finishing the amp. I never realized how small a champ actually is, and the task became somewhat difficult. I have somewhat of a problem with what may be arthritis, so i don't like working in very small spaces with a soldering iron. Didn't burn myself this time though, which is good.



I'm not at all a fan of the paper bobbin transformer, but since I decided to go entirely for the "mojo" on this amp, and since the transformer was what Mojo had, I used it.



Overall I do like the amp quite a bit, although I do tend to have to play around with my tone control a bit more on my guitars now. Both of my guitars are quite bright sounding, so it takes quite a bit of tweaking sometimes. If I can find some more older tubes I'll see how those sound. I actually had a JJ GZ34 have the plastic base break off when I was trying to insert it into the tube socket.

As far as tubes go:

Amperex 12ax7
Sylvannia 6vg
Amperex Bugelboy GZ34
#6
Cool, Champs can be fun amps.

Tweed amps are tough amps to build, I am with you on that. A simple circuit like a 5F1 or 5E3 get real cramped in some tight little Fender chassis. It get's so tight in there and it's hard to route.
#7
Quote by kurtlives91
Cool, Champs can be fun amps.

Tweed amps are tough amps to build, I am with you on that. A simple circuit like a 5F1 or 5E3 get real cramped in some tight little Fender chassis. It get's so tight in there and it's hard to route.


Yeah, it was quite a change from wiring up the wreck, which had its own problems with the 5 million components coming off of the tube sockets. Hopefully i'll get a chance to design a board for that amp as I have some things I don't like about the layout. Should make it easier to build a stable amp.
#8
I really wouldn't change the layout if I were you.

The lead dress and layout is what makes those amps what they are. KF was very precise and specific about that always. A few inches of extra wire or wire in the wrong place can take you from sonic heaven to a howling mess.
#9
Quote by kurtlives91
I really wouldn't change the layout if I were you.

The lead dress and layout is what makes those amps what they are. KF was very precise and specific about that always. A few inches of extra wire or wire in the wrong place can take you from sonic heaven to a howling mess.


People always say that, but many others have completely changed the layout and have success in producing a very good amp. The reason that you have the problem with a bit of extra wire in the trainwreck is because of how the layout was done. Ken got lazy in a few areas, and hell... if he is right always why should I even have tried to clone his amp. I mean... according to Ken no one else could make an amp that sounded anything like his.

What I am doing should produce a much more stable amp to begin with. A big problem is the fact that you have long wire runs from the different HT to the parts of the amp. A good layout should position the filter capacitor for each stage as close to it as possible. This reduces the ammount of ripple that can be reintroduced after it is filtered out. Too much ripple reaching the preamp and you are screwed.