#1
Hi guys! I just wanted to make sure I understand this right...

say you have D to G#.... that's a augmented 4th?
and say you have D to Ab.... that's a diminished 5th?

Or are those all interchangeable?

And if you had like D to E which is a major 2nd, would D to E# be an augmented 2nd while D to F is a minor 3rd?

Thanks in advance!
#3
Quote by saw7988
Hi guys! I just wanted to make sure I understand this right...

say you have D to G#.... that's a augmented 4th?
and say you have D to Ab.... that's a diminished 5th?

Or are those all interchangeable?

And if you had like D to E which is a major 2nd, would D to E# be an augmented 2nd while D to F is a minor 3rd?

Thanks in advance!

D Major is D E F# G A B C#

So..
D to E is a Major 2nd...so D to E# is an Augmented 2nd
D to F# is a Major 3rd...so D to F is a minor 3rd
D to G is a Perfect 4th....so D to G# is an Augmented 4th
D to A is a Perfect 5th...so D to Ab is a Diminished 5th
D to B is a Major 6th
D to C# is a Major 7th

A Major or Perfect interval + a semitone is Augmented
A minor or Perfect interval - a semitone is Diminished
#4
Yep all those intervals are correct, but they are not interchangeable, despite the interval distance being the same. Whether you use an augmented 4th or a diminished 5th depends on context.
#5
yep you're totally right - although the intervals are enharmonic they're technically written as you said.

to add to what zhilla said and complete the circle
a major interval - a semitone = a minor
a minor interval + a semitone = a major
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#7
Sweet, thanks for the help guys.

Confusius - do you mean the shapes of all the intervals over various #'s of strings? eg a perf 5th is up 7 frets on the same string, or up a string and up 2 frets (disregard ->B string)
#8
Quote by saw7988
Sweet, thanks for the help guys.

Confusius - do you mean the shapes of all the intervals over various #'s of strings? eg a perf 5th is up 7 frets on the same string, or up a string and up 2 frets (disregard ->B string)
I think he means both.
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#10
Cool...

So not that I don't agree with you or anything.. I think learning those fretboard relationships are good, but I'm curious where you actually use them? When I improvise I generally create melodies from entire scales, do you pick out specific intervals or something, or what?
#11
melodies are made up of series intervals rather than random notes from a scale. the direction the melody takes is all about the intervals which are used. If your melody goes C - E -G the G will have a different function and fell different than if you go C - A - G, but it is still the same degree of the scale. The reason for the difference is because of the sequence of intervals - you're going up minor 3rd to the G in the first melody and down a major 2nd to the G in the second.

If you can hear a melody in your head and work out the intervals and know how the intervals feel on a guitar then you don't have to go through scales at all, which is win
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

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Practice more
#12
Quote by saw7988
Hi guys! I just wanted to make sure I understand this right...

say you have D to G#.... that's a augmented 4th?
and say you have D to Ab.... that's a diminished 5th?

Or are those all interchangeable?

And if you had like D to E which is a major 2nd, would D to E# be an augmented 2nd while D to F is a minor 3rd?

Thanks in advance!


Zhilla did an amazing job of answering your question. The answer to the question in bold is: No. When you write it on the stave, D to G# and D to Ab occupy different lines so they can't be changed.
#13
Cool...

So not that I don't agree with you or anything.. I think learning those fretboard relationships are good, but I'm curious where you actually use them? When I improvise I generally create melodies from entire scales, do you pick out specific intervals or something, or what?


It's helpful to know them. It's not that I think ok major 2nd now, then a perfect fourth, now the a major sixth. I think something more like: that's a C, where's the third? where's the seventh? If you ever get lots, it's helpful to know.
#14
Quote by saw7988
Cool...

So not that I don't agree with you or anything.. I think learning those fretboard relationships are good, but I'm curious where you actually use them? When I improvise I generally create melodies from entire scales, do you pick out specific intervals or something, or what?

Well, if you know what a certain interval sounds like then you can anticipate what a note will sound like before you play it by thinking of the interval. This does require ear training to recognise and remember intervals but it's imensly useful in things like improvising and transcribing.