#1
My band is covering a song from our drummers old band. There's a short solo/riff thing halfway through the song and I'm trying to figure out what key it's in (I don't think it's the same as the rest of the song). You'll see why I'm confused:


D | --7--5-----------4-------------------------
A | 8-------8-7-5 5----7--5---------------------


So there's an E, an F, a Gb and a G. Any ideas?
#3
what key is the rest of the song in?

I would guess the Gb/F# is an accidental. That narrows down the key to some mode of F or C major
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#5
how do you work this stuff out? I thought it relied on the tonic of the piece, so if the tonic was A then the key would be A....

Or is that wrong??
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#6
I hear G major when I play it but that depends entirely on what the other instruments are doing and how it is played.
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#7
The rest of the song is, I believe, in C Major. Most of it's only 4 chords -- F Major, C Major, D Major and A Major (I realize those last two aren't in the key of C Major but they fit with the song.)

So I guess you could say this riff is still in Cmajor with a Gb thrown in?
Last edited by drewfromutah at Jul 30, 2009,
#8
Quote by MacMan2001
how do you work this stuff out? I thought it relied on the tonic of the piece, so if the tonic was A then the key would be A....

Or is that wrong??

Yes that is correct - if the tonic is A the key is A, but then the question remains A what? A major, A minor, A dorian?

to work that out you need to look at the intervals (number of semitones apart relative to A) Each mode has a specific pattern of intervals so if it matches directly to that then you are in that key. Most music has accidentals however (notes in the song outside the key of the song) for example, blues commonly uses the maj 3rd as well as the minor. (so in E blues you may see both a G and G#). you need to take those into account and it then becomes a bit of guesswork/more complicated to establish the key from the context of how it sounds overall.
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#9
Quote by drewfromutah
The rest of the song is, I believe, in C Major. Most of it's only 4 chords -- F Major, C Major, D Major and A Major (I realize those last two aren't in the key of C Major but they fit with the song.)

So I guess you could say this riff is still in Cmajor with a Gb thrown in?


Since this is only one bar of riff it is unlikely to change key then change back again in a single bar, so yes if the rest of the song is in C major then this bar will be in C major also, with the Gb as an accidental (it is a b5 or tritone in fact so is acting as 'blue note' here). This is a good example of how not all licks/riffs need to be based around the tonic, they can be based around other notes and don't have to include the tonic at all!

EDIT: sorry for dp :s
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#10
@ doive

Thanks
Quote by necrosis1193
Somewhere in a concert hall in Sweden, you have just caused Yngwie Malmsteen physical pain. You also caused him to catch on fire.


Quote by frusciante.ve
I like that new song of theirs that goes all "peeeeeaaaas wiiiill comeeeeee toooo meeeee"


Just because you Seymour Duncan, doesn't mean you Seymour Dunshould
#11
Quote by doive
Since this is only one bar of riff it is unlikely to change key then change back again in a single bar, so yes if the rest of the song is in C major then this bar will be in C major also, with the Gb as an accidental (it is a b5 or tritone in fact so is acting as 'blue note' here). This is a good example of how not all licks/riffs need to be based around the tonic, they can be based around other notes and don't have to include the tonic at all!

EDIT: sorry for dp :s


Thanks, you explained it really well.
#12
glad to be of musical service
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#13
From your two posts TS, it looks like there are two keys at play here... Key of C and Key of D or A. That little piece in the first post outlines two chords, F major and D major. Judging from what you said about the chords, it sounds like a happy song? Or are those 4 chords just in the solo section?