#1
Now, I've been reading the Crusade colums and taking notes so I remember all the info. My question is this: How do you make a song? According to the Circle of Fifths, if I'm understanding this correctly, D, A and G go together. But does this mean I can use the scales and chords from those notes together? And then my next question would be: How do you combine scales to make it sound good? I know you can make riffs within a scale, but how would you transverse 2-3 scales in a certain riff or even solo?

Thanks.
#2
Ok, I'll try and answer some of your questions.

Quote by Iron Disturbia
How do you make a song?

I assume you mean a traditional song with chords and vocals. These are probably the most natural songs to write.

OK, so what do you want to write your song about? You should have a reason for writing the song, not just because you want to write one. Think about an issue you think you could write a song out of (unrequited love is a pretty common one )

Anyway, once you've done this you should probably write some lyrics, dont worry if they sound crap, they'll sound better with music.

Now, writing the music, first I should probably adress the other questions

Quote by Iron Disturbia
According to the Circle of Fifths, if I'm understanding this correctly, D, A and G go together.

I think you've misunderstood. The Circle of Fifths is just a tool for remembering how many sharps/flats are in each key. The key of C has no sharps, the key of G ,one fifth higher than C , has one sharp. The key of D ,two fifths above C , has two sharps. You see the pattern?

Now D, A and G do go together but not in the way you seem to think. Each key has certain chords which are made from the notes of that scale. These chords are diatonic to the key. They are triads, which are made by writing out the notes in the key then taking the first note, skipping one, taking the third note, skipping one and taking the fifth note. This is done starting on each note in the scale.

If you do this to the key of C you get:

C Dm Em F G Am Bdim

In fact in any key, the first will be major, minor, minor, major, major then diminished. This pattern is written like this:

I ii iii IV V vi viidim

Capitals represent majors, lower case minors and the dim is the diminished chord. If you apply this to D major you get:

D Em F#m G A Bm C#dim

As you can see it has the major chords D, G and A so they were related as major chords but not as scales as you thought.


So now we can go back to writing the song. Now you need a chord progession to play. The easiest way to write one is to pick a key that you are going to write in, lets choose C for example. Then you look at the chords that are diatonic to that key and play around with them until you find a progression you like. You can have chords that are not in key (non-diatonic) in a chord progression but when you first write songs it helps to stick to chords in key.

You now have a chord progression, now play these chords and try and sing your lyrics over it, in whatever melody sounds good to you. It doesn't matter if you cant sing, its the notes we are interested in. Keep playing and singing the lyrics in different tunes until you find one you like. You can then write a solo by playing about with the notes in C major (or whatever key you want).

Your first song should now be complete. Most likely it will awful but keep writing and keep learning theory and incoparating more interesting ideas in your work (because being totally diatonic gets boring).

Quote by Iron Disturbia
But does this mean I can use the scales and chords from those notes together? And then my next question would be: How do you combine scales to make it sound good? I know you can make riffs within a scale, but how would you transverse 2-3 scales in a certain riff or even solo?


Usually only one key is used at a time. You can modulate between keys (change key halfway through the song) but it is probably best to stick to one key untill you are more comfortably writing.

Sorry, if I went over stuff you already knew, I wasn't sure how much you knew already.
#3
Wow, thanks for the excellent response. So if I'm getting this correctly, D A and G don't go well, but if I play in the key of D, I cna play any scale (if they match) and any chord I can make with the D?
#4
Quote by Iron Disturbia
Wow, thanks for the excellent response. So if I'm getting this correctly, D A and G don't go well, but if I play in the key of D, I cna play any scale (if they match) and any chord I can make with the D?


no, read it again
#5
Quote by Iron Disturbia
Now, I've been reading the Crusade colums and taking notes so I remember all the info. My question is this: How do you make a song? According to the Circle of Fifths, if I'm understanding this correctly, D, A and G go together. But does this mean I can use the scales and chords from those notes together? And then my next question would be: How do you combine scales to make it sound good? I know you can make riffs within a scale, but how would you transverse 2-3 scales in a certain riff or even solo?

Thanks.



The reason you have those questions is because you're looking at the theory without the context.

how do you make a song?.....

- 1st you might try learning how to play a bunch of songs

When you have a repertoire built up, then use your theory knowledge to analyze the music. You can still be learning and building upon the basics as you develop your repertoire. Eventually it will all come together and you will be able to answer your own questions (the ones you just asked here)


Learn music ....analyze.... internalize
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 31, 2009,