#1
I consider myself a decent guitarist, and so do others.. But i'd never had the recording experience before, and I had a whole lotta trouble playing simple 8th note power chords..

Playing them to fill out the 4 bars (the very end, before changing chord) was difficult for me, and letting them ring out for the 4 bars caused me a bit of hassle too.. I didn't realise how perfect playing had to be

Is the any really effective ways I can improve on this weakness?
#2
Ever play in a band? Probably not used to keeping time without the guitar in the backround.
#3
practice clean.. or not even plugged in.. you will hear if you're clean or sloppy
#6
As much as I hate to admit it but the metronome is the only that can help u (I am strugllin with it my self it makes the practice less fun ) but hey achieving perfect isnt easy.
#7
Quote by hairypineapple
I consider myself a decent guitarist, and so do others.. But i'd never had the recording experience before, and I had a whole lotta trouble playing simple 8th note power chords..

Playing them to fill out the 4 bars (the very end, before changing chord) was difficult for me, and letting them ring out for the 4 bars caused me a bit of hassle too.. I didn't realise how perfect playing had to be

Is the any really effective ways I can improve on this weakness?
Use a metronome, count the beat if it helps, tap your foot, and keep recording yourself. You can't improve on a weakness until you know you've got it, so its great you recorded yourself and found out. Now you can fix it

I find I not only hear all the little mistakes in recordings that I wouldn't normally notice, but I screw up a lot more from the pressure of trying to get it perfect. I find its a great way of learning something though - if I think I'm playing something accurately and cleanly I'm probably close, but if I can record something accurately and cleanly then I reckon I've got it.
#8
if you're talking about playing with a click track the real trick isnt playing perfectly but not going "Oh noes" when you drift slightly off the beat which EVERYONE does but having the conciousness to go go "forward" in the beat without missing the whole beat. Remember it is more about the groove and if you have a drummer that helps. Also what helps me is to record a second click track of me playing mutes on the guitar in the kind of groove that im about to play on the guitar simulating a bass and a snare.
#10
I remember an Al Di Meola interview I saw on Youtube where he stresses the importance of tapping your foot. He feels that being able to tap your foot to the beat is the key to being able to play rhythm on time.
#11
Quote by hairypineapple
I consider myself a decent guitarist, and so do others.. But i'd never had the recording experience before, and I had a whole lotta trouble playing simple 8th note power chords..

Playing them to fill out the 4 bars (the very end, before changing chord) was difficult for me, and letting them ring out for the 4 bars caused me a bit of hassle too.. I didn't realise how perfect playing had to be

Is the any really effective ways I can improve on this weakness?


Ok I will give you some good advice, because it took me a LONG TIME to figure this out myself. There are two kinds of recordings: live and layered. A live recording is the full band, playing as if you are live, and comes as is. The benefit of this type of recording is that is good for artists that sound very good live, but it is often riddled with errors and flaws, even with the best of live guitarists.

The second type of recording is a layered recording, which i'm sure you have heard of. The best advice that I can give you for this is to layer the same portion over itself three or four times playing the same exact thing, then to pick two of the recordings that sound the best and stereo them. If you play it correctly, you should have four nearly identical recordings. Also, if you stereo them you will have the benefit of choosing parts of the remaining two that sound the best, ultimately enhancing the quality of your recording.
ALSO make sure that you have headphones on and you can hear yourself while you are playing. Without this the recording is a cat and mouse game searching for the right tone.
Last edited by silentdud at Jul 31, 2009,
#12
I have the opposite sort of problem. I always play my guitar unplugged. So when I plug it in, it ends up getting a lot more blarey because of strings ringing more when they are amplified. Things also don't seem to disappear as fast. And you don't need to apply nearly as much pressure or pick nearly as hard.
#13
Quote by jsepguitar
I remember an Al Di Meola interview I saw on Youtube where he stresses the importance of tapping your foot. He feels that being able to tap your foot to the beat is the key to being able to play rhythm on time.


I heard that too in one of the Guitar World product demos for the Peterson BodyBeat (basically a pulsing metronome), saying it was better to feel the beat than to hear it.