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#1
I started building a practice room several months ago, however, it's not quite complete. I got funded for this project, so I'm not going to worry about spending a few hundered dollars or whatever. But, I have to account for each dollar spent. I already spent $5,000 on the equipment and supplies alone. I just don't want it to be cheaply made.

I soundproofed the already thick concrete walls with plywood of some sort and nailed carpet on top of it. I also carpeted the floor. The room has dimensions of: L=19ft x W=11.5ft x H=9ft+ Does anyone know of a way to isolate the drums from the rest of the room so they're not as loud? I already put down acoustic foam and bass traps on my list of things to buy. Maybe a plexi-glass wall or something? I know those don't run cheap. I'd like to stay within a few hundred dollars for each item. Also, does anyone know of an inexpensive drum riser? Or a do-it yourself kit? Any other suggestions on how to make the room accoustically sound better? The only catch is that I cannot knock down any walls or cut into any walls. There's asbestos.
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#4
Quote by divinorum69
Isolating the drum, not a good Idea, he will not hear you.

Try insted dumping the TOMS, AND using HOT RODS Sticks to play, and of course,, PLAY a little LESS loud, PLAY at SMALL volumeS.

Sorry MY caPS key IS messed UP



OT: i was baked and saw this and thought i was havin an anurysim or sum ****

but to ts - pics or its an outhouse
~Defiant~
#5
Quote by divinorum69
Try insted dumping the TOMS, AND using HOT RODS Sticks to play, and of course,, PLAY a little LESS loud, PLAY at SMALL volumeS.

Blasphemy. Hod rods suck, toms are crucial.

Put up a cage and let him rage!
#6
Tar paper, like the kind used in siding/roofing is a great sound absorber. Put a layer behind your carpet and such... Also, dead air is for friend, any gaps in the wall layers are good.
#7
What do you mean by "Drum Risers" You mean a thing that raises the drums from the floor? Or som sort of other thing. I'd imagine they'd be fairly easy to build, just like building a deck. Except, more shock absorbent.
..I was watching my death.
#9
instead of plexiglass walls, you can use maybe those makeshift walls if you understand what I mean. Those things that are like usually covered with carpet and have metal frames.. Anyways, Plexiglass isn't too cheap, but you can buy a sheet or two online and make the walls yourself. It'd be cheaper that way.

And put foam on the walls?
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#10
Asbestos, Is that some sort of food?

The plexiglass walls aren't worth it, IMO, they take up to much space.
..I was watching my death.
#11
^timbit, PLEASE tell me you are kidding.
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#14
I was kidding btw... You think somone wouldn't know what it is?
..I was watching my death.
#15
Quote by apak
instead of plexiglass walls, you can use maybe those makeshift walls if you understand what I mean. Those things that are like usually covered with carpet and have metal frames...


Like cubicle walls? Good idea!
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#17
Quote by Invader Jim
If you were kidding then you can have a warning for spam. How's that?


****, I didn't realize. Sorry
Damnit, I guess this counts as spam.

About TSs drums, You can get silencers or Mufflers for them. They work great for dampening the noise.
There's even Cymbal silencers, though I can't imagine they'd work very well.
..I was watching my death.
#18
Quote by asfastasdark
Like cubicle walls? Good idea!

That's exactly what I meant. i couldn't think of it. And then you can like cut out a few rectangles or something for the drummer to see through. haha. That's what they did at my church because they had no money.
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#19
Playing at low volumes gives its benefits. It allows you to talk while you reahearse. Ergo, you can point out mistakes, and also things that are good.
If the drumer is Isolated he will hear himself more than the others, this can make a nuisance because he can go out of tempo and dont notice, he can make mistakes because he is not following the songs correctly.

Dampen the Drums, buy some hot rods, spend 20 dollars, play at little less loud, and save your self from plexiglass ****.

Ive tried the plexiglass in order to Isolate the drums when recording at home, it does not do a very good job. And the plexiglass, I did not make the mistake of buying it, it wass a left over from my father's office.

If you wanna check my recordings at home check out my band's myspace on my signatures, they are the recordings with less plays
#20
Quote by divinorum69
Playing at low volumes gives its benefits. It allows you to talk while you reahearse. Ergo, you can point out mistakes, and also things that are good.
If the drumer is Isolated he will hear himself more than the others, this can make a nuisance because he can go out of tempo and dont notice, he can make mistakes because he is not following the songs correctly.

Dampen the Drums, buy some hot rods, spend 20 dollars, play at little less loud, and save your self from plexiglass ****.

Ive tried the plexiglass in order to Isolate the drums when recording at home, it does not do a very good job. And the plexiglass, I did not make the mistake of buying it, it wass a left over from my father's office.

If you wanna check my recordings at home check out my band's myspace on my signatures, they are the recordings with less plays

Yeah, but it's no fun playing quietly. Some people can't even do it to save their lives. My friend can't play quietly well. he has to pound the drums hard. Your option is good too, depending on the people's tastes, but TS hasn't responded to anything yet, so let's wait and see.
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#21
Quote by apak
Yeah, but it's no fun playing quietly. Some people can't even do it to save their lives. My friend can't play quietly well. he has to pound the drums hard. Your option is good too, depending on the people's tastes, but TS hasn't responded to anything yet, so let's wait and see.



I know what you mean, Its hard to get used to playing softly. But ME, I play guitar, I REALLY suck at drums, I can make a basic 4/4 beat real soft. Its not that difficult just practice.

Its not very fun, for the drumer playing softly since (if he is a good drummer) long fills or fast fills, are incredibly difficult to achieve playing softly.

What we point out to the drummer is:
Save the anxiaty for playing loud when we go live. We also every once in a while crank everything up, and make stupid things for fun, such as playing My Sharona as fast as we can in order to reduce the final timing by a half
#22
Here's an idea....why not make it an open faced drum space? Use the cubicle walls around the sides and back, and leave the front open. Maybe even make a roof.
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#23
Quote by Natrone
Here's an idea....why not make it an open faced drum space? Use the cubicle walls around the sides and back, and leave the front open. Maybe even make a roof.

The thing is, most of the drums sound goes forward. So it wouldnt be that effective
#24
Quote by divinorum69

If the drumer is Isolated he will hear himself more than the others, this can make a nuisance because he can go out of tempo and dont notice, he can make mistakes because he is not following the songs correctly.


if a drummer cant keep time with himself then he isn't that good of a drummer to begin with.

TS, get yourself a book on acoustics and soundproofing. or better yet go do some reading over here http://www.gearslutz.com/board/studio-construction-acoustics/
lots more knowledgeable people on the subject. i could chime in with my .02 but i wont be telling you anything you cant figure out for yourself by following the link i provided.
#25
Quote by divinorum69
Playing at low volumes gives its benefits. It allows you to talk while you reahearse. Ergo, you can point out mistakes, and also things that are good.
If the drumer is Isolated he will hear himself more than the others, this can make a nuisance because he can go out of tempo and dont notice, he can make mistakes because he is not following the songs correctly.

Dampen the Drums, buy some hot rods, spend 20 dollars, play at little less loud, and save your self from plexiglass ****.

Ive tried the plexiglass in order to Isolate the drums when recording at home, it does not do a very good job. And the plexiglass, I did not make the mistake of buying it, it wass a left over from my father's office.

If you wanna check my recordings at home check out my band's myspace on my signatures, they are the recordings with less plays


That's what monitoring is for. Drums sound ****e when they're quiet. That's what most people who aren't drummers fail to understand.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#26
Quote by divinorum69
I know what you mean, Its hard to get used to playing softly. But ME, I play guitar, I REALLY suck at drums, I can make a basic 4/4 beat real soft. Its not that difficult just practice.

Its not very fun, for the drumer playing softly since (if he is a good drummer) long fills or fast fills, are incredibly difficult to achieve playing softly.

What we point out to the drummer is:
Save the anxiaty for playing loud when we go live. We also every once in a while crank everything up, and make stupid things for fun, such as playing My Sharona as fast as we can in order to reduce the final timing by a half


If you don't practice loud, you're not going to be able to play loud at shows.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#27
cant you just insulate the **** out of the place (soft materials work great like you already said carpet and foamlike materials) and turn the other instruments up and if need be get some good quality ear plugs, im sure i saw some made for gigs that dont muffle the sound just make it quieter.

Is it essential that its sound proof is it in a residential area?
#28
Quote by gtanny
cant you just insulate the **** out of the place (soft materials work great like you already said carpet and foamlike materials) and turn the other instruments up and if need be get some good quality ear plugs, im sure i saw some made for gigs that dont muffle the sound just make it quieter.

Is it essential that its sound proof is it in a residential area?


it's not about soft materials. it's about dense materials.
#29
Quote by noisefarmer
it's not about soft materials. it's about dense materials.


Dense materials allow vibrations from sound to travel more efficiently, so if you want to waste energy in a material and keep things quiet, it's all about soft materials.
#30
i think you may have that backwards. things like fiberboard arent exactly soft, stink like tea, and are pretty dense. rubber sheeting while being flexible is also a dense material. both those are used for soundproofing in studios.
#31
Quote by eddiehimself
That's what monitoring is for. Drums sound ****e when they're quiet. That's what most people who aren't drummers fail to understand.

^stupid statement^

there is some tonal differences but someone who would make that type of statement is obviously not good enough to catch them.

but to the TS,i think plxi with 4" or 5" holes drilled across wouldnt be bad at all.it would provide the ability to see clearly,yet it would still somewhat mute the volume.just set the kit up kinda low(i.e.cymbals not 80s skyward...)try to keep the kit below his neck then make the plex as high as his neck.so he could hear himself as well as the band.thats the best i could come up with without going full booth.
#32
you could make some rectangular frames using a couple of butt joints and shove some material around it
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#33
In soft materials, the particles are more free to vibrate with a larger distance between them. The sound energy is wasted on making them vibrate freely, instead of transmitting the vibrations to another particle in close proximity.

Edit: But in super-dense materials, the particles can't vibrate at all, so the vibration isn't transmitted and dissipates.

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Last edited by -MintSauce- at Jul 31, 2009,
#34
Quote by -MintSauce-
In soft materials, the particles are more free to vibrate with a larger distance between them. The sound energy is wasted on making them vibrate freely, instead of transmitting the vibrations to another particle in close proximity.

Edit: But in super-dense materials, the particles can't vibrate at all, so the vibration isn't transmitted and dissipates.

OH I GIVE UP


it's all about killing those low end frequencies, hence the need for density. those low end frequencies are stronger than the high end and much more difficult to silence.
#35
Personally in a room that's well carpeted with a drop ceiling, playing with a full band isn't that loud. I played with a loud drummer and a huge set, and I didn't crank up a blues junior much more than 3 with the master maxed out.

The carpet really helps, but I think you're taking this too far. It's pretty simple to play with a drummer, even with vocals. Put some couches in there too.... to sit on.
#36
I always wanted to do this.
The basement at my parent's house would be perfect to make a practice area in.
I just don't have the funds to invest into a project of that magnitude.

G/L!
#37
Quote by jakemarionmusic
^stupid statement^

there is some tonal differences but someone who would make that type of statement is obviously not good enough to catch them.


you must be having a laugh mate! If you're playing loud music like rock, the drums sound thousands of times better when you're playing them loud as opposed to quietly. They're supposed to be hit hard, so they can sing. Same goes for the cymbals as well. In fact i've got Z customs which officially sound absolutely ****e when you don't hit them hard. But hit them hard and they sound ****ing great. You're clearly the one who doesn't know what you're talking about here.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
Last edited by eddiehimself at Jul 31, 2009,
#39
Quote by eddiehimself
you must be having a laugh mate! If you're playing loud music like rock, the drums sound thousands of times better when you're playing them loud as opposed to quietly. They're supposed to be hit hard, so they can sing. Same goes for the cymbals as well. In fact i've got Z customs which officially sound absolutely ****e when you don't hit them hard. But hit them hard and they sound ****ing great. You're clearly the one who doesn't know what you're talking about here.


Weve got A customs that sound fair nice when hit not hard.

Regardings the drummer: One thing is to play well, another is to play in tempo. Now, try to mantain tempo through various minutes while stopping changing beats, its not that easy if you cant hear your band that well. Trust me ive have been reahersing with my band for over 2 years now with ****ty equipment. In ARGENTINA, due to protection to exports the DOLLAR is way high over the local currency, so equipments, brought from USA, cost 3 times more than over there in the US, plus counting that our money is worth 1/3 of a dollar. So amps cost over 4 or 5 times more here. For you to know a simple JCM900 amp head costs here 3000 dollars, a Fender American Strat cost 3000 dollars. My point is, weve been playing with amps that suck and we cant crank them up because they are all solid state and they sound like ****.

Lots of times the drums played at a normal volume would be way to loud, not letting ourselves hear each other. Nobody could hear nobody so it went like balls. We went out of tempo, that didnt mean I, or my friend is not a good guitarist, ONE thing is to play alone, another is to play in a band you need to cordinate what you play, and drummers, most of them they do go out of tempo if do not play with a metronome, at least during their first year or so playing with a band.

of course mike portnoy never goes out of tempo, but I made the assumption TS's drummer can go out of tempo because, anyone can make mistakes. But I believe the drum controls the tempo of the song so it is quite importatn for the drummer to be heard, and for the drummer to hear everyone thats why I stand strong against Isolating the drummer.

The best is to dampen the drums, and play low volumes on a small band room. Of course it depends what music style you play and the size of the room, you can play jazz in much less volume since the snare is not used such frequently as in metal or so, therefor sound is less penetrating.

We dont know what TS's room dimensions are so we cant really argue correctly. We started playing loud, reahersing loud, because yeah we thought that it sounded great, but now that we've learned what can be achieved by playing low, weve found out lots of things that were incorrect and weve made our songs even better.

In my band practice room, we can play to medium volumes before everything goes insane, it really helped isolating the walls, because theres no more reverb now, so everything plays better, but Isolating did not reduce the volume so much.

here is a video of my band's room, if you are interesting. By the way, im playing drums just to mess around, that was the first day I played drums EVER, and I mean it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCdh5UPKGL0&feature=channel_page

Check it out, youll understand what I mean about ****ty equipment, we are using A Peavy amplifier solid state from the 90's, a STUDIO Chorus 210.

Cheers, I Hope I made some sense,
#40
All,

To clarify a few things. It doesn’t have a drop ceiling. The ceiling is higher than 9 feet, and it’s not really symmetrical. I gave the dimensions of the room. It’s L=19ft x W=11.5ft x H=9ft +

I’ll find some pics so I can elaborate on this.

My band mostly plays rock/metal; but there will be other people using the space with many different styles of music. But, for the sake of it, if I had to choose a genre I’d stick to hard rock/metal.

I don’t mind playing softer, but playing at low volume doesn’t sound that great with tube amps. Then there’s the preamp issue. My drummer doesn’t play too loud either. I don’t think every drummer would follow that request. A plexi-glass wall may not be feasible then, although it was a good idea...

Also, I know a little about dampening with different material densities. Someone made a comment about that. A less dense material will allow frequencies to travel through and not dissipate as much. That's what I'm going for now, is better acoustics. The soundproof level will be pretty good once i add some bass traps.

I read a book that said something about a golden ratio. The best possible design was to be asymmetrical as possible. Would lowering the ceiling height be beneficial? What about the floating floor idea?
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