#1
Ok, this is probably gonna sound weird but when people are credited as writing the music for a song, does this mean that they wrote the guitar, bass, drums, etc. or just the guitar parts? i.e. Jerry Cantrell is credited as writing the music for most of the Alice in Chains music, does that mean he wrote the bass lines and drum lines too, or just the guitar?
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#3
depends on how the credit is written, even if they actually wrote the parts the way the player on the recording plays it is what makes the part anyway
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#4
It probably means he wrote the most prominent parts. The parts that define it as a unique song. That usually means the vocal melody.
#5
I don't know if this helps, but check the copyright for dummies thread, section 1 entitled "Basic Principles."

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1053221

If you 'wrote' a guitar part or a drum beat or a bass line or whatever, you generally do not get a writing credit. When you see words by XXX and music by YYY, usually XXX is merely the lyricist and YYY wrote the melody and probably a significant part of the accompaniment. But what matters is the melody. Accompaniment is to a song what clothes are to a person. Dressing. That's it.

It's all explained in the copyright thread.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Ok, I read the Basic Principles section. Tell me if this. Whoever writes a riff that is easily distinguishable and not just random chords and notes is credited as writing the music, even if the bassist and drummer wrote the bass and drum parts, is that right, or am i not getting it?
Gear:
Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster
Epiphone G-400
Line 6 Spider
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
BOSS DD-3

"Wish I Had This" Gear:
Guitars- G&L, Gibson, PRS
Amps- Egnater, Bogner
Effects- Fulltone, JHS, Eventide
#7
Quote by CGB89
Ok, I read the Basic Principles section. Tell me if this. Whoever writes a riff that is easily distinguishable and not just random chords and notes is credited as writing the music, even if the bassist and drummer wrote the bass and drum parts, is that right, or am i not getting it?


Legally, a song is the melody and the lyrics. The person/people who write them get the credit.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Ok, very, very n00b question but what is the melody? I completely forget, blonde moment.
Gear:
Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster
Epiphone G-400
Line 6 Spider
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
BOSS DD-3

"Wish I Had This" Gear:
Guitars- G&L, Gibson, PRS
Amps- Egnater, Bogner
Effects- Fulltone, JHS, Eventide
#9
A melody is essentially a recognizable and unique series of notes that you can sing, whistle, or hum.

In a song, the main melody is carried by the singer (s).

Once you get into recognizable and unique riffs, like say, Walk This Way or something, I would personally call that a compositionally important and melodic part of the piece. A court *might* disagree. The riff from Whole Lotta Love is recognizable, but it is really only three notes cycled over and over. A court may well decide that it is not a recognizable and unique part of the piece that is compositionally important. Or they might.

OTOH, a vocal melody is almost 'automatically' considered compositionally important to the piece.

Consider this.... what if someone re-arranged Whole Lotta Love for piano and vocal and took out the guitar riff completely. Would it still be Whole Lotta Love? Why, yes.... yes, it would. So how 'compositionally important' is it? Now, re-arrange Smells Like Teen Spirit and change the melody in the chorus, but keep the same words. It would take a whole lot longer to recognize. Now, *that* is compositionally important.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Oic. I find it odd that one person writes the lyrics, the other writes the melody. i.e. Man in the Box Lyrics: Layne Staley Music: Jerry Cantrell. Or a better one, in the notes for Music Bank, Jerry Cantrell says he wrote the guitar for Sickman and Layne wrote the lyrics (and melody) yet Layne is credited with Lyrics, Jerry is credited with Music.
Gear:
Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster
Epiphone G-400
Line 6 Spider
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
BOSS DD-3

"Wish I Had This" Gear:
Guitars- G&L, Gibson, PRS
Amps- Egnater, Bogner
Effects- Fulltone, JHS, Eventide
#11
Writing credit can go by who *actually* wrote the parts, or can go by who they are, for whatever reason, are willing to *agree* as to who wrote the parts. In other words, sometimes it can be negotiated, or can be the terms of a friendly collaboration.

"You write the guitar part, and I'll assign you 40% credit as a cowriter" kind of thing.

Case in point....

I guy I know is in a band who was signed to Capitol who went multi-platinum and gold worldwide back in the '80's. Opened for KISS, etc. Their biggest hit song had the chorus written by an outside writer. My friend wrote the verses, and wrote/co-wrote about 98% of the rest of the band's repertoire. He got NO writing credit for the song. Part of the 'negotiated' terms was that the band would record this song, and the person who wrote the chorus would get the writing credit. All of it. The label insisted they record the song. As it turns out, it's a good thing they did, as that was the song that really 'broke' them, but still.... he got none of the writing credit, even though he wrote probably about 2/3 of the song.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.