#1
So i took up running/jogging cross country, but my foot keeps falling on its side which bruises it so i cant walk.

Would an ankle/foot brace help this? Im using running shoes with good grip but it keeps happening.
#2
Quote by Walwort
So i took up running/jogging cross country, but my foot keeps falling on its side which bruises it so i cant walk.

Would an ankle/foot brace help this? Im using running shoes with good grip but it keeps happening.



yes a ankle brace, or you can get tape and tape it. sounds like you have weak ankles, the best way to probably strengthen them is run. one thing we use to do pre season football would god out and jog barefoot in the grass, that way your ankles have no support so it forces them to get stronger.
#3
like youre overpronating? if thats it then you need stability control running shoes. if you mean youre like rolling your ankle then a brace could work, or running barefoot in the grass as the gentleman above said. or just any ankle strengthening excercises really.
hope this helps
#4
my ankles are pretty thick. it might be because i am 200 pounds...

what i mean is my foot is landing horozontal while i am running. I used to get this happening as a kid. I am not flat footed...ive been told i have a high instep whaever that means.


additional question what effect would ankle weights have on this? i need them to improve my double bass drumming muscles.
Last edited by Walwort at Jul 30, 2009,
#6
You might be able to find a certain kind of running shoe that would help with that. There are stores that have employees who analyze your feet and movement and can diagnose certain problems. These shoes usually cost a lot though, but if its really that bad it might be worth it.

Edit: Ankle weights will make the actual running awful, but when you take them off you will feel incredibly light. You should wear them when walking too. If you did this and took them off before you played drums you would probably play a lot faster.
Last edited by EBC at Jul 30, 2009,
#7
Ooh! Ooh! I'm a runner!

You should go to your local running store. They generally have you walk across the floor and evaluate how your foot lands. Definitely sounds like pronation, although they may recommend gel inserts.

Oh, and absolutely don't wear ankle weights while running. Please.
#8
Quote by Kilimacory
like youre overpronating? if thats it then you need stability control running shoes. if you mean youre like rolling your ankle then a brace could work, or running barefoot in the grass as the gentleman above said. or just any ankle strengthening excercises really.
hope this helps


This right here.

Your pronation matters a lot. Being an under or overpronator will cause you much harm in the long run if you don't fix it. Definitely check out a running store and get some good running shoes.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#10
Quote by Walwort
my ankles are pretty thick. it might be because i am 200 pounds...

what i mean is my foot is landing horozontal while i am running. I used to get this happening as a kid. I am not flat footed...ive been told i have a high instep whaever that means.


additional question what effect would ankle weights have on this? i need them to improve my double bass drumming muscles.



weight has nothing to do with it. if it's 200 lbs of fat then your ankle has little muscle support, but if it's 200 lbs of muscle, then your ankle should strengthen.

I weigh 185 lbs, but most of it is muscle instead of fat, so the ankle is able to support itself.
#11
Quote by darkstar2466
This right here.

Your pronation matters a lot. Being an under or overpronator will cause you much harm in the long run if you don't fix it. Definitely check out a running store and get some good running shoes.

lolpun.

Also, try doing ankle strengthening exercises before running, like walking on the outside of your feet or on your toes or heels.
Last edited by me_llamo_juan at Jul 30, 2009,
#12
Quote by me_llamo_juan
lolpun.


Didn't notice that at all.

Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#13
well its actually the outside of the foot that i fall on.
i wear nike air max things.

i am very muscular but somewhat fat as well.

christ, it was enough of a struggle getting started, i might just do cycling instead. Is 40 mins of power cycling the same as 20 mins running?
Last edited by Walwort at Jul 30, 2009,
#14
Quote by Walwort
well its actually the outside of the foot that i fall on.
i wear nike air max things.



That's your problem. Get real running shoes.

EDIT: No, it is 1:3 for biking to running. 60 min of biking is 20 min running for roughly same intensity.
#15
Quote by Walwort
well its actually the outside of the foot that i fall on.
i wear nike air max things.

i am very muscular but somewhat fat as well.

christ, it was enough of a struggle getting started, i might just do cycling instead. Is 40 mins of power cycling the same as 20 mins running?


4 - 5 miles of cycling = 1 mile of running. Don't do that indoor cycling machine thing or run on treadmills. Both are unnatural and bad for you.

Read this for ankle strengthening exercises:

http://physicaltherapy.about.com/b/2006/06/04/ankle-strengthening-exercises.htm
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#16
Quote by darkstar2466
4 - 5 miles of cycling = 1 mile of running. Don't do that indoor cycling machine thing or run on treadmills. Both are unnatural and bad for you.

Read this for ankle strengthening exercises:

http://physicaltherapy.about.com/b/2006/06/04/ankle-strengthening-exercises.htm



Hmm thats a lot. What about running in the house on the spot? I used to do that but wasnt sure it was effective.


Drumming and sex as well i consider exercise.. Can you buy watches that tell you calories burned or energy expended? This would be useful.

Try a Drumming Session for Keeping Fit

By WLR Trainer Nicola Glanville

A study conducted by the Universities of Gloucestershire and Chichester has concluded that drumming is an equivalent workout to playing in a Premier League football match. Scientists behind the Clem Burke Drumming Project will work with the Department of Sport, Health and Social Care at the University of Gloucestershire to develop programs to help overweight youngsters to get fit.

Drumming Session Increases Heart Rate

This study is based on the findings that Clem Burke (the drummer from the band Blondie) and the football player sustained similar heart rates throughout a 90 minute period. The important fact to take away from this is that individuals with differing levels of fitness can benefit equally from different intensities of activity.

For example, an unfit person may gain the same benefit from 30 minutes of walking as a fit individual would get from 30 minutes of jogging. The fitter your body gets, the more you have to do to challenge it and to gain the benefits from exercise.

Therefore the fact that the drummer’s heart rate is the same (averaging 140-150 BPM over 90 minutes) as the footballer’s shows that his drumming is as challenging to his body as the game of football is to the footballer.
Drummers Use Whole Body to Produce Beat

The study shows that we don’t all have to play premier league football to achieve the benefits of exercise. Let’s have a look at drumming as an example; drumming can be good exercise if played at a vigorous intensity for a prolonged period.

Despite initial appearances, drumming isn’t just about using your arms. If you watch a professional drummer at work you’ll see that his whole body is working to produce the beat; even his/her feet are pumping to work the foot pedals.

This type of activity requires a high level of exertion to generate continual vigorous movement, not to mention a level of accuracy and coordination that professional musicians are gifted with. But don’t worry, there is a side of this study that can help us ‘mere mortals’ to burn calories and stay fit.
Last edited by Walwort at Jul 30, 2009,
#17
Quote by Walwort
Hmm thats a lot. What about running in the house on the spot? I used to do that but wasnt sure it was effective.



naw, that does nothing. thats a kindergarten exercise.
#18
Quote by Walwort
well its actually the outside of the foot that i fall on.
i wear nike air max things.

i am very muscular but somewhat fat as well.

christ, it was enough of a struggle getting started, i might just do cycling instead. Is 40 mins of power cycling the same as 20 mins running?



This is called supination. I have supination problems as well. Get "cushioned" shoes, not "stability" shoes. "stability" shoes are for overpronation which is the foot rolls inward, while in supination, the foot rolls outward. As for ankle weights, i would not use them until you correct your gait cycle ( your running motion/ how your foot comes down on the ground). After your runs, do barefoot drills. Such drills would include walking on your toes, walking on your heels, walking on the outside of your foot, walking on the inside of your foot (hardest one for me), do some rolling motions with your feet ( stand on one leg and make you other foot go around in circles). eventually your feet/ ankles will strengthen(the effects are not immediate!!! may take a week to notice foot/ankle improvement). stay on grass whenever possible. with cycling, you risk not developing as good of a core muscle system as you would with running ( i.e. you can get a six pack quicker and more defined from running than you can/will from cycling). I've been a serious runner for six years, and though that doesn't qualify me as a fitness expert, let's just say I've done my homework. Good luck and Happy running!

Edit: I would suggest going to eastbay.com and looking at running shoes. they break them down into categories for which type of pronation one could have (Supination in your case). Could get expensive depending on how many miles you want out of the shoes and how serious you are about running. when you find the kind of shoe that fits your pronation and appeals to you in appearance, I recommend you find them at a local shoe or sports/outdoors store to try them out yourself.
Last edited by Soundchains at Jul 30, 2009,