#1
so i've changed the PAF's in my gibson Lp stanard for sh-2n and sh-4

also known as jazz and jeff beck pickup.

now the jeff beck was supposed to give my bridge more volume but its really still the same,

can i ,in any way make the bridge pickup go louder?

peace
Last edited by wolvenrick at Jul 31, 2009,
#2
You can change the height of the pickup.
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#3
Quote by gwitersnamps
You can change the height of the pickup.


higher or lower? because its already touching the high E string in some moments so
#4
Turn up the volume knob on your guitar.

Sometimes the master on your amp helps too.
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#5
Quote by windowmaker
Turn up the volume knob on your guitar.

Sometimes the master on your amp helps too.



bridge pickup volume is at 10

it's only quiet on clean channels

but raising the volume makes the neck TOO ****ing loud making it **** up my ears pretty bad.. also lowering the neck pickup volume doesnt compensate that loudness...

not really smart with the mechanic things so dont know hell what to do
#6
Lower the neck pickup (giving it less volume on high amp volume), and raise the bridge pickup (giving it more volume with high amp volume). You'll get a balanced output.
#7
You seem to be under some confusion as to just how much output these pickups (or in fact any pickups) should give.

Firstly, are you trying to get more excessive natural valve break-up from an all-valve amplifier but you don't want to use an overdrive boost pedal? If so then great, high-output pickups is what you want.
If you don't want that, then there's really no point in you trying to increase the output of your pickups. High-output is for driving a valve amp harder, it has absolutely no benefits beyond that.


As far as the neck/bridge volume balance goes, that's very common. The strings vibrate more at the neck position so if the neck pickup is at the same height as the bridge pickup, it will usually end up generating more output (volume).


As a general rule, fret the high E and low E strings at the highest fret you have - usually the 22nd on most guitars, of course some guitars go up to 24 frets and some may have 21, just fret the two E strings at whatever your highest fret is.
Look at the gap between these strings while they're fretted and the top of the bridge pickup. Ideally the gap should be no less than 2.5mm, some people push it to a little less but this is rarely a good idea. Most people have the pickup about 4mm away from the fretted strings. You can have it much further away - on one of my guitars I have the top of the pickups a centimentre and a half away from the fretted strings. Generally speaking it's fine to put the pickups as low as you can but putting them as high as you can is almost always very bad.
Once you've adjusted the bridge pickup to it's ideal height, then you adjust the neck pickup's height so that it matches the bridge in output (volume), though of course you could make the neck pickup higher/lower output if you want (personally I prefer my neck pickups to have more output than my bridge pickups, but it's entirely personal preference).

Additionally, every pickup is slightly different and you may find that at certain heights a pickup is more responsive than if you lower or raise it. So try and match the volumes up and then tweak the heights slightly to find the best tone for each pickup.
As a general rule, lowering the pickup improves clarity, response and sustain, but of course you lose output. Raising a pickup gives you more output and especially more bass, but you lose clarity and sustain. Personally I find it's better to be a bit lower than you need than to be a bit higher, since output can always be compensated for by a boost/overdrive pedal and as such putting your pickups quite high is a bit pointless, especially compared to the clearer and more responsive tone of lower pickups.
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#8
Quote by MrFlibble
You seem to be under some confusion as to just how much output these pickups (or in fact any pickups) should give.

Firstly, are you trying to get more excessive natural valve break-up from an all-valve amplifier but you don't want to use an overdrive boost pedal? If so then great, high-output pickups is what you want.
If you don't want that, then there's really no point in you trying to increase the output of your pickups. High-output is for driving a valve amp harder, it has absolutely no benefits beyond that.


As far as the neck/bridge volume balance goes, that's very common. The strings vibrate more at the neck position so if the neck pickup is at the same height as the bridge pickup, it will usually end up generating more output (volume).


As a general rule, fret the high E and low E strings at the highest fret you have - usually the 22nd on most guitars, of course some guitars go up to 24 frets and some may have 21, just fret the two E strings at whatever your highest fret is.
Look at the gap between these strings while they're fretted and the top of the bridge pickup. Ideally the gap should be no less than 2.5mm, some people push it to a little less but this is rarely a good idea. Most people have the pickup about 4mm away from the fretted strings. You can have it much further away - on one of my guitars I have the top of the pickups a centimentre and a half away from the fretted strings. Generally speaking it's fine to put the pickups as low as you can but putting them as high as you can is almost always very bad.
Once you've adjusted the bridge pickup to it's ideal height, then you adjust the neck pickup's height so that it matches the bridge in output (volume), though of course you could make the neck pickup higher/lower output if you want (personally I prefer my neck pickups to have more output than my bridge pickups, but it's entirely personal preference).

Additionally, every pickup is slightly different and you may find that at certain heights a pickup is more responsive than if you lower or raise it. So try and match the volumes up and then tweak the heights slightly to find the best tone for each pickup.
As a general rule, lowering the pickup improves clarity, response and sustain, but of course you lose output. Raising a pickup gives you more output and especially more bass, but you lose clarity and sustain. Personally I find it's better to be a bit lower than you need than to be a bit higher, since output can always be compensated for by a boost/overdrive pedal and as such putting your pickups quite high is a bit pointless, especially compared to the clearer and more responsive tone of lower pickups.

Just a quick question, does pickup height have any affect on the amount of feedback produced? Am I correct to assume that the lower the pickup is (in this case the bridge), then the less feedback there will be? I had SD Blackouts installed in my guitar and there is an absurd amount of feedback (squealing, even with the strings muted) with the gain =<2 and master and channel volumes starting at 3.
#9
I have 2 guitars with blackouts and I get some feedback but its nothing more than my other guitars with passive's.

I am sure the closer they are the more *likely they will generate feedback.
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