#1
What are some chords that go well when im playing in the key of E minor?
#2
i like using A minor, and C with E minor

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#6
Probably the chords in the E minor scale: Em, F#m, G, Am, Bm, C, D
C major and D major are gonna sound good but so would a progression from starting with C, to D, then to Em...
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#7
Em
F#diminished
G
Am
Bm, B, B7
C
D
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#8
So if C, D and G go well in the key of e minor does that mean C5, D5 and G5 will go well?
#9
Quote by Duffman123
So if C, D and G go well in the key of e minor does that mean C5, D5 and G5 will go well?

They will, but you'll be glad you learned how to play the more difficult and fuller-sounding chords.
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#10
Quote by Duffman123
So if C, D and G go well in the key of e minor does that mean C5, D5 and G5 will go well?
Yes. 5th chords are essentially simplified versions of other chords that have a perfect fifth. They are dyads, containing two notes; the 1 and the 5. Any chord with a 1 and a perfect 5 can be played as just a power chord and will fit the chord progression. This being said, if the chord was originally a tetrad or some other more complex chord, taking out the other notes (2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13, etc.) may take away from the feel of the song.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jul 31, 2009,
#11
Well... Maybe some chords in the key of E Minor? Also, some out of key notes never hurt anyone, and they allow epic chords like... Fm7, Dmaj7, Bmaj and E7#9 to appear.
#12
I've started this little chart to help me with minor chord progressions. This is by no means all chords that will fit into the minor scale, just the more common ones (and since I like add9's, those too ).

I - Minor, Minor 7th, Minor add9, Sus. 2nd, Sus. 4th

II - Diminished

III - Major, Major 7th, Major 6th, Major add9, Sus. 2nd, Sus.4th

IV - Minor, Minor 7th, Minor 6th, Minor add9, Sus. 2nd, Sus. 4th

V - Minor, Minor 7th, Sus. 4th

VI/VII - Haven't finished yet


These are the chords you can use for the various scale degrees in the minor scale. Someone please correct me if you see any mistakes.
Last edited by Kenny77 at Jul 31, 2009,
#13
I take it you want to write in a certain key specifically on purpose?

It depends on how the piece resolves in a musical context as to which key it's in, so you will need to look at cadences also.
#14
Quote by Kenny77
This is by no means all chords that will fit into the minor scale, just the more common ones


Well, a V instead of v is also very common.
#16
Kenny77, your little chart may have merit, but if you want to write in a minor key using interesting chords, start with things like mmaj7 on the I, half diminished on the II and dom7 on the V... minor chord progressions are often stronger by taking some notes from outside the key.

TS, if you ask whether power chords will work then trying to write a minor chord progression may be a difficult task. Minor keys are often (or should be anyway) quite a lot harder than major keys.
#17
Quote by Duffman123
What are some chords that go well when im playing in the key of E minor?


Learn harmonizing and chord construction. This would be a lot easier to visualize if you have some staff paper for standard notation. Stacking thirds is the easiest way to construct diatonic chords. A major triad consists of a minor third stacked on top of a major third (i.e. in C: C E G is a minor third (E-G) on top of a major third (C-E)). A minor triad consists of a major third stacked on top of a minor third (i.e. in Cm: C Eb G is a major third (Eb-G) on top of a minor third (C-Eb)). A diminished triad consists of a minor third stacked on another minor third (i.e. in C: B D F is a minor third (D-F) stacked on another minor third (B-D)). Knowing the pattern of chords in major and minor scales (lower case=minor, upper case=major, o=diminished)...

Major - I ii iii IV V vi viio
Minor - i iio III iv v VI VII

... We can construct any diatonic chord in any key using the formulas above.

For extended chords (7ths, 9ths, etc.), it uses a similar formula, but easier to understand. Say you're in the key of Em (like your topic post states) and you want to extend a G chord to the 7th. Well, we know a G major chord consists of G B D. To extend it, you simply add the third above D in the key of Em. This would be an F#. So now, we have a G B D F#, which is a Gmaj7!

Note that when extending to a 7th on the V chord in a major key, it naturally extends to a 7 chord, NOT a maj7 chord (i.e. a V7, not a Vmaj7). In the key of C, the V chord is G. G B D. Extend that to the diatonic third above D, and you'll get G B D F. Note how the F is natural. The V7 chord is called the dominant 7 chord.

For all other extensions, follow these same formulas by adding diatonic thirds to your chord. This should be enough to build most chords you'll need. I'm sure this is explained better somewhere, so if anyone wants to post a link to a better lesson, feel free to do so.

Hope this helped.