#1
Hey guys

I was wondering how you usually set up amps and such on stage and how you balance the volumes.

i figured id ask here so i wouldnt have some guitard going "CRANK THE GITARZ ALL THE WAY AND THE REST DUSNT MATTER"

no.
So fellow bassists, how do you make sure that you sound good on stage and mix well as a band?

Im really only asking this becuase at my last gig We all played extremely loud and I felt like it didnt sound like seperate instruments coming together so much as it did one big noise being blasted at different frequencies.

so any tips or insight to this?
much appreciated.
#3
well first off, my band has the bass amp pointed at the drummer so no matter what the sound guy does, our drummer and bassist are in sync. For blending, get someone to walk around the venue and tell you to turn up or down. Also to find a good tone, the sound you hear on the stage sounds much different off so if you can, get someone to play your bass while you walk around the venue and then you can make adjustments.
#5
When I was in my band I was basically in charge of making everyone's amp sound good.
#7
Get everyone to max out their instruments and use the mixer to touch up the final volume. That way, nobody's ego gets over the sound engineers judgment. It happens sometimes that during sound setup the levels are fine, but suddenly during a song one instrument overshadows the rest. If the rest of the band needs to quiet down during a song or something, just play softly dont f u c k around with the volume settings during a number.

Also, as someone said, get a friend or someone who knows sound to go around the place and check out how you all sound. Getting the sound right is 90% of the gig.
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#8
Get everyone to max out their instruments and use the mixer to touch up the final volume.


This is a good idea if everyone's miked, although at small venues you might find that guitar amps aren't miked (and even the bass, if you're very unlucky).

That touches on another point which I'd emphasise - try and get the bass miked/DI'ed in to the sound desk unless you have a mighty, mighty amp. Getting the bass heard is often annoyingly hard, particularly as venues get larger, because the sound doesn't travel as well as high-pitched guitar parts.

While playing - as said above, get a friend (who knows what they're doing) to relay to you if anything's too loud/inaudible, and if the sound desk is at the side of the stage, make sure they know too.