#1
So I am thinking of building my own guitar, for a variety of reasons. First, I don't want to spend 1500 bucks for something that I am going to customize anyways. And two, I want to have the feeling that I built my own guitar.

So here's the question, since I have never built a guitar before, can I succesfully build one that plays just as well as a professional one? I obviously will buy pickups and bridges (not build them myself), but as far as the other stuff (such as bolting the neck to the body or wiring the tone controls), is there no way for me to make it good? Will my pinch/ other harmonics not come out right? What are all the problems of building an electric yourself. Thanks.
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#2
just make sure all the specs are right(fret width,Bridge depth,the distance between the tuners,ect.) get the proper wood and paint,but yeah go for it,my friend wants to make a guitar with me and were gonna start soon,
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#3
Dude, visit this site: http://www.sagamusic.com/catalog/products.asp?CategoryID=4&FamilyID=2&BrandID=77

I bought a Les Paul kit from that site and all kits come with pickups and whatnot. The guitar kit i built worked out beautifully, and the pickups were dimarzio evolutions. Only drawback is that all kits come with a natural wood finish, so if you want colour, you have to paint it yourself. Highly recommend though, nonetheless.
Gear:

- Epiphone Les Paul Standard
- Saga LP Copy
- Godin Seagull Acoustic
- Roland Cube 60
- Fender G-Dec
- Jim Dunlop Crybaby
- Guitar Rig 2
#4
What are all the problems of building an electric yourself. Thanks


Guitar building requires knowledge and skill in several areas.
There is the woodworking aspect, the finishing, fretwork, general guitar set-up, wiring, etc.

If you don't know anything about any of these, you're in for a difficult project. I can't even begin to describe all of the potential problems.
#5
Quote by Metalhead_28
Guitar building requires knowledge and skill in several areas.
There is the woodworking aspect, the finishing, fretwork, general guitar set-up, wiring, etc.

If you don't know anything about any of these, you're in for a difficult project. I can't even begin to describe all of the potential problems.


I will probably just buy the body (I know I don't have the experience to make one out of raw wood) and the neck will already have the frets installed (or I might have the local music shop do it).
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#6
The most important thing to be good at is thinking. Sounds silly, but planning everything, measuring everything, and being able to anticipate potential problems rather than having to react to them is very important.

Woodworking skills are important, as is having the right tools.
As Will said, fretwork and setup are important, but very few guitarists know how to do them. If you need to build skills and confidence, take small steps. Learn how to setup, then do fretwork, then build, etc.
#7
So what you want to do, basically, is assemble a guitar from parts?

There is nothing too complicated about that, really.
It helps if you know a little about doing a set-up on a guitar. The problems you run into are going to be directly proportional to the quality of the components you go with.
#8
Yeah, sorry if I was not clear. I want to assemble a guitar from parts, not totally build one from the ground up. I just want to know, if I use good parts, what types of things could I mess up that would be detrimental to the tone of the guitar (assuming I am not a COMPLETE idiot )
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#9
Well, it depends on the quality of what you buy first and foremost. For example, an ill fitting neck could have an impact on tone.
If the neck has great fretwork - there's one headache out of the way. If it doesn't, you need to know how to tell and also how to remedy it.
You may need to know how to slot a nut.
You need to know how to solder and understand at least a little about wiring.
You need to know how to to do all of the adjustments on a guitar that are essential for a proper set-up.
#10
Assuming I did all those things (which is going to be hard), do you think I can get a good tone (you know, a similar quality to one if I had bought it from ibanez or fender for $1500)?
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#13
Another way to approach a build is to start with a "Project Guitar"from Ebay. I've rebuilt a few old archtops this way, and enjoy bringing old guitars back from the dead. Project guitars can be easy and cheap or expensive and complicated.
But like Metalhead said, you've got to start with the best parts you can. And you have to know what you can and can't fix. A guitar I bought and restored had just one fret that was less than 1/4 of a mm too high, which was all it took to put it in someones garage for years. Even the seller didn't know about the fret problem when he sold it.
Knowing how to setup a guitar right is more important to me than knowing how to screw a few parts together. The best guitar build will suck if it's not setup right.
Pick an easy project first, and don't expect your first efforts to compare to a factory made $1500.00 guitar, your third project might!
#14
Just make sure you do your homework. I put together my partscaster with parts I got off eBay. New MIM Fender Neck and Body, 6 point vintage tremolo, etc. Just make sure all your measurements line up so that when you get your parts you aren't held up because you had to ship something back because it wouldn't fit. I had to ship the first bridge I bought back because I didn't check the mount spacing on the body and ordered the wrong bridge.

I didn't suffer any other hickups though, and the end product was a guitar that is on par with every American strat I've ever played, and definitely the best sounding (Lindy Fralin pickups). It never ceases to amaze me really, every time I pick it up I find one more thing I love about it.