#1
Alright, you see all different guitarists/bassists playing through 3 full stacks and it looks awesome. but how do they do it? how do you connect the amps? I look at bassist JPJ and he has 2 fullstacks, how are they connected?

thanks
w/o bass n drums, there wouldn't really be rock music.

Schecter is pronounced 'Shek-ter', right? I don't want to walk in and say, "Hey, can I try out that Sketcher?" and have the helper reply with "Wtf, we don't sell shoes!"
#2
Cords.

Didn't your other thread explain it?
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yea its way too much for my little stick lol
#4
Well, sometimes, the rigs you see live are fake. If the arena/stadium/whatever they play on has room for a decent enough PA, I think most guitarist hook up 1 single or 2 (for separate gain/clean) amps to the PA. I've seen through overhead cams on several conserts that the giant 3x3 cab rigs are just fiberboard with cab fronts on them.
Tuning 2 or more amps to the exact same sound can be difficult, I think, especially if they have a fullsize rack with eqs and whatnot.
Electrics:ˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑAmps:
Jackson DKMGFFˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑRandall RG100SC G2
Washburn DIME 333ˑˑˑˑˑˑˑRandall RH200X / RA412 2x Half-Stacks
ESP LTD EC-1000 STCB
Dean From Hell CFH
#6
You can power as many amps as you can split your signal. For 2 amps, all you need is any stereo pedal or a passive splitter.
#7
Quote by SinnaSatan
Tuning 2 or more amps to the exact same sound can be difficult, I think, especially if they have a fullsize rack with eqs and whatnot.


They don't need to sound the same, and in fact usually sound better when they don't.
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#8
Quote by SinnaSatan

Tuning 2 or more amps to the exact same sound can be difficult, I think, especially if they have a fullsize rack with eqs and whatnot.

For a lot of people, the whole point of two amps is to have two completely different sounds running at the same time. I run a 2 amp setup, and I dial my amps completely different from another.
#9
Quote by imgooley
For a lot of people, the whole point of two amps is to have two completely different sounds running at the same time. I run a 2 amp setup, and I dial my amps completely different from another.
Yeah, so do I. Very simple though, just one for clean and one for gain.
But what I mean, is that if you use several heads for the sake of amplifying your signal (with the same tone), it might be difficult, although I don't know, never used such big rigs.
Electrics:ˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑAmps:
Jackson DKMGFFˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑˑRandall RG100SC G2
Washburn DIME 333ˑˑˑˑˑˑˑRandall RH200X / RA412 2x Half-Stacks
ESP LTD EC-1000 STCB
Dean From Hell CFH
#10
If you run through 2 amps via a passive splitter you should consider using a buffered pedal before the splitter. Also humbuckers are more susceptible to tone suck than single coils due to the reduced impedance.
#12
Quote by SinnaSatan
Yeah, so do I. Very simple though, just one for clean and one for gain.
But what I mean, is that if you use several heads for the sake of amplifying your signal (with the same tone), it might be difficult, although I don't know, never used such big rigs.

You a/b. I run stereo.

Still simple. I want to run 3 boosts and 2 fuzzes for dirt. That'd give me a stupid amount of versatility with my current rig.

I run a stereo boost currently to split my signal, and 2 fuzzes, one on each amp.
#13
You can run two amps using the line out on the back of one into the input on another. Gotta watch your levels though. Some amps allow for daisy-chaining, like Fender The Twin. And, as the others have said, you can use an A/B/Y switch (Amp 1, Amp 2 or bit together). Some ABY switches are crap and will ruin your tone. You need a powered one, like a Radial Tonebone.