#1
Case in point: I have a Mexican strat and a Les Paul Studio, both of which I play through a Fender Blues Jr. amp with a Boss DS-1 pedal. Both guitars have stock pickups. However, when playing the Les Paul through this amp, open string noise is far greater than the Strat and it distorts in a very crunchy, unpleasant manner, whereas the Strat sounds pretty good overall and isn't as prone to sounding sloppy.

My question is: could this amp simply have issues with humbuckers, with Les Pauls, with Gibsons, or am I just a terrible guitarist? My playing seems markedly worse with the Les Paul on this amp than on my Vox AD50, which sounds fantastic.

Thanks in advance.
#2
I wouldn't think it would be the amp itself but have you tried playing around with the EQ to get a good sound out of it with humbuckers?
#3
Yes.

Considering Humbuckers and Single Coils are pretty different. The Fender Blues Jr. amp I would imagine is geared towards single coils and the Vox is more versatile and works well with both.
#4
Quote by azn_guitarist25
I wouldn't think it would be the amp itself but have you tried playing around with the EQ to get a good sound out of it with humbuckers?


Yeah, I've tried messing around, the only thing that helped was reverb, which just slightly covered up all the problems.

Quote by r0ckth3d34n
Yes. Considering Humbuckers and Single Coils are pretty different. The Fender Blues Jr. amp I would imagine is geared towards single coils and the Vox is more versatile and works well with both.


Is it possible to somehow make the Les Paul and the Blues Jr. work together, or is it a lost cause?
#5
I dunno. I hate Les Pauls and I've never used a Blues Jr.

Mess with ALL the EQ? Including the pedal?

Single coils will sound very different distorted than humbuckers. So if you have the pedal set up for the Fender, that explains a lot.
#6
well the humbuckers on the les paul probably have more output which could be contributing to the "crunchy distortion"
#7
Quote by dysonsphere
Yeah, I've tried messing around, the only thing that helped was reverb, which just slightly covered up all the problems.


So lowering your gain/drive didn't help at all one bit?
#8
Quote by azn_guitarist25
So lowering your gain/drive didn't help at all one bit?


Well it would be misleading to say that nothing changed, I'm sorry. Lowering the gain and controls on the pedal gave the distortion a very dull sound and didn't do anything to remedy the odd open string noise.

Quote by Mayonaise 812
well the humbuckers on the les paul probably have more output which could be contributing to the "crunchy distortion"


That is definitely true, but when I say "crunchy distortion" I mean that it's a very ugly, unpleasing, crackly, Line 6-ish sound, rather than the much more pleasant but heavy distortion my Vox gives.

Quote by r0ckth3d34n
I dunno. I hate Les Pauls and I've never used a Blues Jr. Mess with ALL the EQ? Including the pedal? Single coils will sound very different distorted than humbuckers. So if you have the pedal set up for the Fender, that explains a lot.


Using the same pedal on the Vox sounds fine. Conversely, playing the Les Paul without the pedal on the Blues Jr. still sounds awful. (That is to say, the "natural" distortion of the amp sounds poor as well.)
#12
No, it also has tubes. Tubes all around. It is pretty clearly designed for a clean/lightly overdriven tone, however, whereas the Vox can do everything from clean to incredibly distorted.
#13
Well thats what I was sorta getting to. The Blues amp is geared for the twang and buttery cleans of a single coil. Hence the word "Blues" in the amp name...

And the Vox is geared toward flexibility.

You could swap out the tubes from the Blues... and put in a tube similar to the Vox.

Or use a noise gate with the LP on the Blues amp.
#14
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
Well thats what I was sorta getting to. The Blues amp is geared for the twang and buttery cleans of a single coil. Hence the word "Blues" in the amp name...

And the Vox is geared toward flexibility.

You could swap out the tubes from the Blues... and put in a tube similar to the Vox.

Or use a noise gate with the LP on the Blues amp.


Hm, I just didn't think that some amps could just suck at handling certain pickups...oh well.

I didn't even think about a noise gate, but that's probably the solution I'm looking for. I bet that a little bit of fine-tuning could get an acceptable tone out of the LP + Blues Jr. combo.

Thanks very much for your help.
#15
Oh yeah.

Take a Fender SP-10 (or a small MG), turn the distortion on, turn it up a bit and play single coils through it. Then humbuckers. Then high output or active humbuckers though it

Then think about which sound sounded THE WORST. I bet you don't even have to try it to get it right.

no problem. I try to be helpful.
I'm not sure if the noise gate will work. Because the humbuckers are a higher output than the single coils, so essentially you're getting more signal through the amp, and noise gate reduces feedback coming from single coils, so I'm not sure if it would work with humbuckers on an amp that's geared for single coils... I'd barrow on from a friend before buying one.
Last edited by r0ckth3d34n at Aug 1, 2009,