#1
If you put the same time and effort into guitar (or other instruments) that someone aiming to be a doctor or lawyer or whatever puts into their schoolwork, would there be much chance of being able to get in, maybe not straight away but after a few years of trying? Or is it still a matter of knowing the right people, I guess you can get to know them though right?
#2
Yes but you might not earn as much as a Doctor or Lawyer. Being a session player is a lot more reliable in terms of income than being a performer or a painter or writer.
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#4
Being a session musician is not a reliable income, you might find work for 2 months and then not find any for 8 months.
#5
Quote by griffRG7321
Being a session musician is not a reliable income, you might find work for 2 months and then not find any for 8 months.


This is what tends to bug me about the advice you see on UG - I've never been or even talked to a session musician, so for all I know you could be absolutely correct, but why should I (if I was the TS, looking for advice) take this to be true? After all, you're just one more guy on a forum who's made a statement they haven't backed up.

If you'd said what you said and then added, "and I know this because...I've been a session player/I know a lot of session players/I read this article on session players that you can find at this url...etc."

Again, I'm not saying you're wrong - I've no idea if you're right or wrong - and I'm not so much criticising your advice as trying to highlight a general problem I see on UG. It seems like I read a lot of threads that would confuse the hell out of me if I was the TS - contradictory advice where neither side refers to any outside evidence when I'm sure some of them could to clear the matter up.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#6
Quote by tom1thomas1
If you put the same time and effort into guitar (or other instruments) that someone aiming to be a doctor or lawyer or whatever puts into their schoolwork, would there be much chance of being able to get in, maybe not straight away but after a few years of trying? Or is it still a matter of knowing the right people, I guess you can get to know them though right?


I've just graduated from law, I'll say that you'd become a really good musician if you worked on guitar as much as I studied for law, and am studying for the barre. You'd be talking about 5-8 hours a day on the guitar.

It's still a very competitive field, to be a session musician. You'll have to know the right people in addition to knowing an extremely large amount of genres of music and such. If you wanted to be a session musician, I'd recommend starting to get all the basics of all styles of guitar down now, and stop regurgitating the latest metal band's riffs
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Quote by Damascus
This is what tends to bug me about the advice you see on UG - I've never been or even talked to a session musician, so for all I know you could be absolutely correct, but why should I (if I was the TS, looking for advice) take this to be true? After all, you're just one more guy on a forum who's made a statement they haven't backed up.

If you'd said what you said and then added, "and I know this because...I've been a session player/I know a lot of session players/I read this article on session players that you can find at this url...etc."

Again, I'm not saying you're wrong - I've no idea if you're right or wrong - and I'm not so much criticising your advice as trying to highlight a general problem I see on UG. It seems like I read a lot of threads that would confuse the hell out of me if I was the TS - contradictory advice where neither side refers to any outside evidence when I'm sure some of them could to clear the matter up.



I understand what you're saying, but it's pretty common sense.

Artists bring out like 1 album a year, which is recorded in like a week or 2.

Given that there are 1000's of musicians that want to be in that business, and that are qualified as far as guitarplaying goes.

I mean, obviously all the "bands" are their "own" musicians, so this would only count for pop musicians & singer songwriters.

And from the sheer amount of albums, not all features guitar parts, so begin able to play as many instruments on a decent level is almost a must.

Also, most instruments on pop albums and the like are often recorded by the songwriters themselves. (special songwriters, not the performers)

I think you have the best chance, if you learn to write catchy pop songs in different musical styles, because there are quite some songs being written and bought.

I'd reckon that you have more chance your song stands out, then your guitarplaying.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 2, 2009,
#8
Quote by tom1thomas1
If you put the same time and effort into guitar (or other instruments) that someone aiming to be a doctor or lawyer or whatever puts into their schoolwork, would there be much chance of being able to get in, maybe not straight away but after a few years of trying? Or is it still a matter of knowing the right people, I guess you can get to know them though right?


It's not the basket that I would put all of my eggs in, if you know what I mean.

But certainly with the right skills, (more than just playing) it is possible to make some money doing it.

A living?..... maybe.... realistically It would be a supplemental income. Who knows though, You might be amazing and have friends and relatives in the business.


Quote by Damascus
This is what tends to bug me about the advice you see on UG - I've never been or even talked to a session musician, so for all I know you could be absolutely correct, but why should I (if I was the TS, looking for advice) take this to be true? After all, you're just one more guy on a forum who's made a statement they haven't backed up.

If you'd said what you said and then added, "and I know this because...I've been a session player/I know a lot of session players/I read this article on session players that you can find at this url...etc."

Again, I'm not saying you're wrong - I've no idea if you're right or wrong - and I'm not so much criticising your advice as trying to highlight a general problem I see on UG. It seems like I read a lot of threads that would confuse the hell out of me if I was the TS - contradictory advice where neither side refers to any outside evidence when I'm sure some of them could to clear the matter up.


If you don't know, why say anything at all? His advice is just as valid as anyones. And it's more valuable to this thread than you trying to start an argument.

I mean if you have experience in this area, by all means share it. Otherwise uhh... post in a thread where you do have something positive to contribute?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 2, 2009,
#9
Being a session player is not really a great job IMO. You have to play what others want and not what you want. Also dealing with egos and not getting much credit. If you want to put that much time into practice, do something on your own or form your own serious band.
#10
There is bound to be a ridiculous amount of competition for these kind of things, so maybe you shouldn't kill yourself trying to obtain it. You will have to be a very versatile player, but also you will need a great personality to be able to pull it off. The personality part is going to be equally important here, you have to be the kind of person that easily makes connections and gets along with many different personality types. They aren't looking for virtuosos or great composers, they are looking for guys that have the right personality and skill set that applies to the usual sort of recording situation. Unless you have friends in the business or you are Mr. personality I wouldn't kill myself trying to obtain that sort of job. I doubt its really a dream job either, a lot of it would be like babysitting. I've heard stories from people who work in the field about the sort of morons they have to deal with and constantly having to deal with idiocy like being offered to be paid in weed (lmao) and other things.

An easier career path in music would be to get a degree from a good school (from a jazz or classical program) and teach lessons, play shows and whatnot.
#11
If you don't know, why say anything at all? His advice is just as valid as anyones.


Well, no, it isn't. He's making a statement about the nature of studio work; it's not unreasonable to ask what qualifies him to make such a statement.

And it's more valuable to this thread than you trying to start an argument.


It's only valuable if it's true. It doesn't surprise me at all that you consider trying to ensure that people are giving truthful advice "trying to start an argument".

I mean if you have experience in this area, by all means share it. Otherwise uhh... post in a thread where you do have something positive to contribute?


Again, apparently trying to ensure that the TS is getting truthful advice doesn't qualify as "something positive".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 2, 2009,
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
If you don't know, why say anything at all? His advice is just as valid as anyones. And it's more valuable to this thread than you trying to start an argument.

I mean if you have experience in this area, by all means share it. Otherwise uhh... post in a thread where you do have something positive to contribute?


You have fundamentally misunderstood both my general attitude and the point I was trying to make. I realise that sounds fairly inflammatory (as if now I am trying to start an argument), but believe me, it's just a statement of fact.

My point - which I made in the post you're referring to - is that on UG, I often see threads where different posters give contradictory advice and, in addition to this, very few people ever explain why they are saying the things that they do. They rarely cite their own experience, the experience of people they've talked to, books, articles, whatever.

Now, given that you often get contradictory information with no way of distinguishing it, I know that if I was some of the TSer's, I would get very, very confused. Who would I listen to? And why? Even on threads where there isn't a massive difference of opinion, if it all looks like opinion, then why would I trust it? They haven't said why their opinion is right, so it's possible that they're just wrong.

What's more, I know that some people have the information, but they're not deploying it - the one guy I know on this forum from real life posted in a thread explaining something that he's taken a degree in, but he didn't mention this, or point out why what he was saying was true, so if I'd been the TSer of that particular thread, I'd have had no idea whether to listen to him or to the next guy, who was saying completely the opposite thing and was 100% wrong.

My post, therefore, was an attempt to highlight this so that perhaps people posting on UG will take a little more time to explain why it is that their points are correct, which would hopefully mean fewer incorrect posts, more good advice and less confusion all round.

I'd say that was a fairly positive contribution.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#13
i did studio work for 12 yrs on and off...like pressure...you have picked the right profession..the better you get at it the better you have to be...years ago..there were only a handful of studio guitarists that worked and made decent $$..the term "A-Team" was used by the contractors (few knew music...the knew how to fill a chair)

howard roberts, joe diorio, tommy teidesco are three extrema success stories of some studio pioneers .. later examples..larry carlton, george benson come to mind...google them .. today the field if very crowded and super competitive..

to be honest...i got tired of the pressure..you have to keep your skill level up and constantly improve it..there is a 20yr old kid that wants your chair..

advice i would offer...learn to sight read..at least two bars ahead..ALL CLEFS, learn ALL STYLES (yeah even polkas) learn how to recover from a missed note and not break tempo..(this is a call back killer) go through a fake book..read ten head sheets..no mistakes...transpose the head sheet to a new key on the first read through .. stay in tempo...play the head sheet in as many octaves as possible..

learn how to do all the above in the 2-4 mins after you see the head sheet for the first time..yes really!!!

this would be the minimum skill level to start before even thinking about a career..

hope this helps...

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Aug 2, 2009,
#14
Quote by Tempoe
Being a session player is not really a great job IMO. You have to play what others want and not what you want. Also dealing with egos and not getting much credit. If you want to put that much time into practice, do something on your own or form your own serious band.

Thats the whole point of being in session and wanting to get paid for it. Who cares about credit when you trying to pay the bills.

TS, there is work as a session muso, and go for it... if you can get it. That is the key... if you can get it. Studios tend to book the more established session guys because they are used to them, know them, and trust them. It is very difficult to just break into the scene. I'd probably go so far as to say its even harder than getting into advertising. Its all about who you know, not necessarily how high up the neck you can squeal.
Check out for a book by Tommy Tedesco: "For guitarists only". This book goes into detail of what you should know, what you can fake... and it also has a few little stories about the gigs he's been on and his humour is great. Another player to read up on is Carl Verheyen, one of the top session guitarists around... his videos and books are great. Also go through Guitar magazine.... he has some awesome columns.

I hope this helps, and wish you luck on your new journey
#15
Quote by Damascus
You have fundamentally misunderstood both my general attitude and the point I was trying to make. I realise that sounds fairly inflammatory (as if now I am trying to start an argument), but believe me, it's just a statement of fact.

My point - which I made in the post you're referring to - is that on UG, I often see threads where different posters give contradictory advice and, in addition to this, very few people ever explain why they are saying the things that they do. They rarely cite their own experience, the experience of people they've talked to, books, articles, whatever.

Now, given that you often get contradictory information with no way of distinguishing it, I know that if I was some of the TSer's, I would get very, very confused. Who would I listen to? And why? Even on threads where there isn't a massive difference of opinion, if it all looks like opinion, then why would I trust it? They haven't said why their opinion is right, so it's possible that they're just wrong.

What's more, I know that some people have the information, but they're not deploying it - the one guy I know on this forum from real life posted in a thread explaining something that he's taken a degree in, but he didn't mention this, or point out why what he was saying was true, so if I'd been the TSer of that particular thread, I'd have had no idea whether to listen to him or to the next guy, who was saying completely the opposite thing and was 100% wrong.

My post, therefore, was an attempt to highlight this so that perhaps people posting on UG will take a little more time to explain why it is that their points are correct, which would hopefully mean fewer incorrect posts, more good advice and less confusion all round.

I'd say that was a fairly positive contribution.


If you want more "good advice", why don't you start by contributing some yourself?

Quote by Archeo Avis
Well, no, it isn't. He's making a statement about the nature of studio work; it's not unreasonable to ask what qualifies him to make such a statement.


It's only valuable if it's true. It doesn't surprise me at all that you consider trying to ensure that people are giving truthful advice "trying to start an argument".


Again, apparently trying to ensure that the TS is getting truthful advice doesn't qualify as "something positive".


Explain how his post or yours "ensures" that the TS is getting "truthful" advice.


Ya know, if you actually gave some "truthful" advice, or any advice at all actually, that would at least potentially serve your purpose better.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 2, 2009,
#16
If you really did put in alot of effort and practiced 6 to 9 hours every day even weekends then sure, but at that point id just record a album and hope to be the next shred god
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#17
my guitar teacher was a session musician - i was talking to him about it, basically his conclusion was he could never really get enough session work to make it a full career so took up teaching on the side - slowly teaching became his main career, till he did almost no session work at all (he did the odd amateur dramatics musical type stuff).

To be a studio musician, you have to be technically flawless, versed in a wide range of genres and know when to shut up and not say anything - which is all the time.

James Jamerson is an example of a very sucessful session musician. He was the motown bassist from 1958 and yet remain entirely uncredited until 1971. In his early career he was given no leyway and just had to play straight out what was written. As he became a more respected studio musician he was allowed to have slightly more freedom in his playing, but was still incredibly limited. he lost his job at motown in 1973.
Quote by wikipedia
Long troubled by alcoholism, Jamerson died of complications stemming from cirrhosis of the liver, heart failure and pneumonia on August 2, 1983 in Los Angeles. He was 47 years old and was said to be broke and bitter about his lack of recognition at the time of his death


He was one of the most successful and influential sessions bassists of the 70's and this is how he valued himself. Now think that you probably won't even come close to that. could you do it?

I would recommend studying hard and getting a degree and going down a professional career root, there will always be more session musicians than demand for them so they will never be well respected or well paid. They will also always be at the mercy of the record companies - even if you're the best out there they can choose to turn you down and take some other guy and there is not a damn thing you can do.

but what would i know, after all "this thread's a great idea, i'm a maths nerd"
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#18
Quote by GuitarMunky
If you want more "good advice", why don't you start by contributing some yourself?


Explain how his post or yours "ensures" that the TS is getting "truthful" advice.


Ya know, if you actually gave some "truthful" advice, or any advice at all actually, that would at least potentially serve your purpose better.


This has to be intentional stupidity, because no one could possibly miss the point he was trying to make. Here, I'll break it down for you...

TS: Asked question regarding the nature of studio work.
griffRG7321: Made statement regarding the nature of studio work, but did not explain how he came to possess this knowledge.
Damascus: Pointed out that the TS was likely to receive conflicting advice, meaning that confusion is likely if no one can substantiate their claims and explain why their claims should be taken any more seriously than the other, conflicting claims.

To use an analogy, this is sort of like some anonymous person on the internet claiming that HIV doesn't cause AIDS...and asking us to take his word for it. Person B comes in and points out that it doesn't work that way, asking what education they have in the field and pointing out that they need to provide some sort of support for their claim. Then, you come in and start whining about how Person B is contributing nothing, ranting about how he has no right to question the claims of said anonymous poster unless he also makes an unsubstantiated claim about AIDS.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 2, 2009,
#19
Quote by Archeo Avis
This has to be intentional stupidity, because no one could possibly miss the point he was trying to make. Here, I'll break it down for you...

TS: Asked question regarding the nature of studio work.
griffRG7321: Made statement regarding the nature of studio work, but did not explain how he came to possess this knowledge.
Damascus: Pointed out that the TS was likely to receive conflicting advice, meaning that confusion is likely if no one can substantiate their claims and explain why their claims should be taken any more seriously than the other, conflicting claims.

To use an analogy, this is sort of like some anonymous person on the internet claiming to have solved a unsolved problem in mathematics...and asking us to take his word for it. Person B comes in and points out that it doesn't work that way, and that they need to provide some sort of support for their claim. Then, you come in and start whining about how Person B is contributing nothing, ranting about how he has no right to question the claims of said anonymous poster unless he also solves an unsolved problem in mathematics.


Person B openly admitted that he has no experience whatsoever with the subject, and that the person he was complaining about actually "could be right". Maybe he should do some research and found out for sure before complaining.

Anyway, you didn't answer my question. How does either of your posts ENSURE that the TS gets "truthful advice"

And I'd appreciate it if you not refer to my post as "stupidity". That really doesn't ensure anything but an argument and/or a closed thread.

Thanks
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 2, 2009,
#20
Quote by GuitarMunky
Person B openly admitted that he has no experience whatsoever with the subject, and just came in to complain about someone elses posts.


Apparently asking someone to back up their claims qualifies as "complaining", and apparently you are not allowed to ask that someone else to provide evidence for their claims unless you are an expert in the field.

Anyway, you didn't answer my question. How does either of your posts ENSURE that the TS gets "truthful advice".


By calling attention to the fact that the poster has provided no support for his claims. One generally arrives at the truth by calling attention to faulty arguments and demanding evidence.

And I'd appreciate it if you not refer to my post as "stupidity". That really doesn't ensure anything but an argument and/or a closed thread.


You completely missed the purpose of his post despite it being spelled out to you, and openly admitted that you believe asking another person to support his or her claims is a waste of forum space. This is not only stupidity, it is willful stupidity.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 2, 2009,
#21
Well, Arch I have to tell you that I didn't miss a thing regarding the purpose of either of your posts.

You spelled out the reason here...

Quote by Archeo Avis
to ensure that the TS is getting truthful advice.


I completely understood, and responded here...

Quote by GuitarMunky



Explain how his post or yours "ensures" that the TS is getting "truthful" advice.


You've twice avoided answering this question. Again, I would appreciate it if you can keep the person insults to yourself.

Thanks
shred is gaudy music
#22
.... experiencing a freaky sense of deja vu.....

First, as I see it, Damascus has expressed something that I have found exasperating too - people making unsubstantiated claims about which they know nothing about. My personal fave is the one when people step up to the plate in copyright threads saying, "it's okay as long as you're not making any money from it." They clearly don't know what they are talking about. They're just rattling off something they believe might be true. If you ask someone to substantiate their claim - which is generally considered essential practice in academic and scientific circles - they'd best have evidence. If they can't substantiate it, it is an empty statement. Damascus was asking for substantiation of the claim. I see no problem with that.

In ensuring a standard of quality or accuracy in responses to threads, that, to me, IS making a positive contribution.

About this....

Quote by GuitarMunky

And I'd appreciate it if you not refer to my post as "stupidity". That really doesn't ensure anything but an argument and/or a closed thread.


This is a really fair request followed by a logical prediction of the consequences. Yes, we have seen this before.

Quote by Archeo Avis

This is not only stupidity, it is willful stupidity.


In light of that fair request, this was quite uncalled for, IMHO.

In light of the fact that there seems to be some people who have some knowledge of this who are participating in the discussion - or more to the point - who are answering the posted question, I'm leaving this open for now.

CT
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#23
In light of that fair request, this was quite uncalled for, IMHO.


I don't see how. The rationale behind Damascus' post was clearly described to him multiple times, and yet he persisted in demeaning his post and baselessly claiming that asking others to substantiate their claims is unnecessary and should be frowned upon. I'm not using using "stupid" as a generic insult here; I really do think Munky's post demonstrate not only a lack of intelligence, but an outright hostility to rational discourse.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#24
Quote by axemanchris
.... experiencing a freaky sense of deja vu.....

First, as I see it, Damascus has expressed something that I have found exasperating too - people making unsubstantiated claims about which they know nothing about. My personal fave is the one when people step up to the plate in copyright threads saying, "it's okay as long as you're not making any money from it." They clearly don't know what they are talking about. They're just rattling off something they believe might be true. If you ask someone to substantiate their claim - which is generally considered essential practice in academic and scientific circles - they'd best have evidence. If they can't substantiate it, it is an empty statement. Damascus was asking for substantiation of the claim. I see no problem with that.


The way I see it, you can be part of the solution by adding some advice of your own, based on your own knowledge and experience. Without that, I don't see how you're solving anything. I mean how many posts in this forum are unsubstantiated ? (in this very thread even).

What happens when you call someone out for making an unsubstantiated statement, without offering any substantiated advice of your own? Certainly you make the other poster look like a fool, but do you really solve any problems? or do you just create a new one? And if you know nothing of the subject yourself (which is one of the 1st things damascus said), how do you know that the person your calling out, isn't actually correct. how do you know he doesn't have experience or know someone.
Do people have to cite their credentials after every single post? If they did, would it stop people from arguing with them? Worth considering IMO.

(you meaning any poster in general.... not you personally)
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 2, 2009,
#25
What happens when you call someone out for making an unsubstantiated statement, without offering any substantiated advice of your own? Certainly you make the other poster look like a fool, but do you really solve any problems? or do you just create a new one?


You point out a flaw in the reasoning of the other person that others (or the poster himself) may fail to realize, which might lead them to exercise some skepticism rather than accepting a claim that is lacking evidence. All of this has been explained to you.

Your position can summarized as follows: His reasoning is flawed, but I won't point it out because I don't know much about the issue; I don't care that other people may not spot the flaw and may take his advice, even though it may very well be wrong..

You've twice avoided answering this question.


I answered it. Add "illiterate" to the list of insults I've used.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 2, 2009,
#26
Quote by Archeo Avis
You point out a flaw in the reasoning of the other person that others (or the poster himself) may fail to realize, which might lead them to exercise some skepticism rather than accepting a claim that is lacking evidence. All of this has been explained to you.

Your position can summarized as follows: His reasoning is flawed, but I won't point it out because I don't know much about the issue; I don't care that other people may not spot the flaw and may take his advice, even though it may very well be wrong..


I answered it. Add "illiterate" to the list of insults I've used.



* reported for flaming
shred is gaudy music
#27
Quote by GuitarMunky
What happens when you call someone out for making an unsubstantiated statement, without offering any substantiated advice of your own?


Hopefully the poster you called out will respond with something to back up his or her statements and the TS won't have to be skeptical of the post. Even if you didn't give advice, you're still pushing things in a direction where readers won't need to be skeptical. Announcing skepticism isn't starting an argument, it's saying "I can't believe your statements without further evidence."

Damascus said he didn't know much about the subject, which is cool because he didn't give any advice about it either, as it should be.
#28
A friend of mine actually just left for New York to do some work with Martin, Medeski and Wood. He just graduated from Columbia(in Chicago) in one of their guitar programs and is an incredible player. He has done some work with other artists and loves session work. So it really just depends on the person whether it's something you'd even like to do or not.

You do have to dedicate hours and hours a day for years to technical palying, theory study, ear-training, sight-reading, and composing in basically every genre imaginable.
#29
Quote by GuitarMunky
The way I see it, you can be part of the solution by adding some advice of your own, based on your own knowledge and experience. Without that, I don't see how you're solving anything. I mean how many posts in this forum are unsubstantiated ? (in this very thread even).

What happens when you call someone out for making an unsubstantiated statement, without offering any substantiated advice of your own? Certainly you make the other poster look like a fool, but do you really solve any problems? or do you just create a new one? And if you know nothing of the subject yourself (which is one of the 1st things damascus said), how do you know that the person your calling out, isn't actually correct. how do you know he doesn't have experience or know someone.
Do people have to cite their credentials after every single post? If they did, would it stop people from arguing with them? Worth considering IMO.

(you meaning any poster in general.... not you personally)


Damascus' entire point was that he didn't have any advice and he would like to have someone who does have advice give it, but with their own personal experiences or sources to back it up. It's really very easy to understand and you are taking it in entirely the wrong way.
Quote by dudetheman
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#30
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Damascus' entire point was that he didn't have any advice and he would like to have someone who does have advice give it, but with their own personal experiences or sources to back it up. It's really very easy to understand and you are taking it in entirely the wrong way.


^ that's not what he said his point was. He wasn't asking for clarification out of interest for the subject as you imply.

Quote by Damascus
I've no idea if you're right or wrong - and I'm not so much criticising your advice as trying to highlight a general problem I see on UG.


THIS was his entire point.


Take out ^ this post and all of the posts related to IT, and you'll have something useful to the TS (and what was asked for)...... peoples opinion on a particular subject.

I doubt very much that the TS would have only read that 1 single post, and then made any life changing decisions based on it.


Most people (I assume) will read through the various posts, looking for conflicts and corroboration.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 3, 2009,
#31
This has to be one of the silliest arguments I've ever seen, just because of how it is so clearly not intended to be one. No one is asking for evidence that you have to be a good guitarists; that would be starting an argument ('where is your evidence that I have to be a good guitarist?' haha). The guy said that you might find work for two months and then nothing for eight months, and another guy asked him how he knew.

I suppose I could be missing something, but I think Mr. Munky created an argument by expecting an argument, which I don't really blame him since everyone here just argues and insults ech other all the time haha.

Right now, I believe griffRG7321, even though he hasn't said how he knows this, because it makes sense I guess haha, and I trust that he knows what he's talking about, because he stated it like he knew it. I sound pretty foolish haha.

I can't really contribute because I don't know myself, but how many session musicians do you know, if any? There's no reason to have a million session musicians. There also is no reason for the company to even give you any credit. Plus, you'd just be playing what other people order you to play. It seems like you'd be a tool; not a musician.

Certainly the more time you put into something, the better, but also consider that it isn't entirely how hard you work, but how 'smart' you work. If you're interested in being a studio musician, the smartest thing you could do - and easiest - is to call some studios, and ask them if they are hiring, tell them you're really good (yeah, you have to actually be good haha) and want to be a studio musician. You could even try talking to a studio guitarist. I doubt you can just call up a random studio and ask to talk to the guitarist and get all the info you want, but if you really want to be a studio guitarist, you'd learn everything you can about being one, and that doesn't mean just starting a thread.

But again, I wouldn't recommend being a studio musician for any reason, unless you like being a tool. Also, I have not given you any reason to believe a word I said. For all I know every guitarist I don't know is making a good living a loving his job as a studio guitarist.

Here are some links though. I used google btw haha

http://www.sessionmusician.com/

This article pretty much is telling you NO WAY
http://www.recordingreview.com/articles/articles/186/1/Can-You-Be-A-Session-Musician/Page1.html

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/oct98/articles/sessionmusic.html

fficial&client=firefox-a">fficial&client=firefox-a">http://www.google.com/search?q=be+a+session+musician&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-USfficial&client=firefox-a

The world needs more doctors; not guitarists.
#32
Quote by griffRG7321
Being a session musician is not a reliable income, you might find work for 2 months and then not find any for 8 months.


"Many musicians face intermittent periods of unemployment, reducing their yearly income considerably. As a rule, musicians work for more than one employer and supplement their incomes with other types of jobs."


I found this corroborating statement at http://careers.stateuniversity.com/pages/129/Musician.html

I've also done some studio work myself, and am friends with a number of session players. Even though you didn't post any references or your credentials (who does on every post?), your advice was consistent with what I know to be true and with the other posts here. (the ones that offered advice). It wasn't far fetched, or off topic, simply another voice in a public forum.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 3, 2009,
#33
Quote by Archeo Avis

I answered it. Add "illiterate" to the list of insults I've used.


Nothing quite like drawing attention to your other list of insults while you add another....

warned

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.