#1
I have the tab book for Axis: Bold As Love and all the songs in there are extremely difficult, but I want to learn how to play Hendrix. Should I wait until my guitar skills improve or should I go head on and try and learn some songs, and what songs on the album are the best to learn for improving skill?
#2
Little Wing's intro, Spanish Castle Magic, and Castles Made of Sand were pretty easy for me (Castles Made of Sand was a bit more difficult, but I learned it kinda fast).

How long have you been playing? Also, just take each part VERY slowly till you can play it perfectly then move on to the next part.
#3
learn the songs. start slow and always play to a metronome. Keep at it even though it might seem like you arent making a lot of progress. After a while if you lose interest, try something else and come back to it. You will see a big improvement.
#4
Quote by FallsDownStairs
Little Wing's intro, Spanish Castle Magic, and Castles Made of Sand were pretty easy for me (Castles Made of Sand was a bit more difficult, but I learned it kinda fast).

How long have you been playing? Also, just take each part VERY slowly till you can play it perfectly then move on to the next part.

Well I've been playing for more than a year and a half.
#5
Hendrix was am ungodly guitarist, and learning his songs (regardless of how successful you are) will improve your playing.
#6
Quote by mjmiller11
Well I've been playing for more than a year and a half.


Then you should have no problem tackling the 3 I suggested from your tab book. I learned Little Wing after shortly 8 months of playing, and Castles made of Sand and Spanish Castle Magic after about a year.

If its the Hal Leonard book, they should seperate it into parts, so take each part very slowly, but split those parts into smaller parts, and take it measure by measure or section by section until you can play each section fully without having to think what comes next.
#7
It is one thing to learn Hendrix's songs and another to want to play LIKE Hendrix.

I always recommened learning his songs, but I do not recommened learning his solos. Especially his improvised solos from this live stuff. Well, the solos from his studio albums are fine, but his life stuff is a whole different ballpark.

His songs will teach you a LOT about riffs, chord progressions and harmonies, but his solos were about self-expression and about what he was feeling at that moment. You should try to create your own solos to his music, maybe find someone to jam with, bring a Hendrix chord progression like Hey Joe or Little Wing and go to town on it.


I'll answer any questions you might have on his style or on his playing, as a Hendrix-disciple myself, he has probably my biggest influence throughout the last 6 years I have been playing. And not just for guitar, but for music as a whole.
There may be times when it is impossible to prevent injustice, but there should never be a time when we fail to protest it.


Take a trip down the Scenic River


Call me Charlie.
Last edited by Seryaph at Aug 2, 2009,
#8
I would learn how he played, I.e his chords, scales, etc. Once you get a rough idea, everything in the book will make sense, I can't describe much because I'm on my iPod.
"Been Dazed And Confused For So0 LoNg ItZ n0T Tru3"

Fender LoneStar Strat.
Peavy VYPYR.
#9
When I try to learn a Hendrix song, I do it differently from learning any other song. First I play through it just playing the chords and bass line bits, and an "outline" of the lead bits. Then, when I have that down well enough to play along with the record, I add the embellishments, meaning the hammeron/pulloffs and the double stops, etc.

For some reason I find with Hendrix that the embellishments just kind of flow better when you know how to play the chords straight up, you may find this useful.


*seems like maybe this is what neo was talking about?
#10
Yes, ^^
"Been Dazed And Confused For So0 LoNg ItZ n0T Tru3"

Fender LoneStar Strat.
Peavy VYPYR.
#11
Quote by Seryaph


I'll answer any questions you might have on his style or on his playing, as a Hendrix-disciple myself, he has probably my biggest influence throughout the last 6 years I have been playing. And not just for guitar, but for music as a whole.


Well I need some help with articulation and it seems to me that his articulation would be the best to learn from. How would I approach this? An also have you read Jimi Biography A Room Full Of Mirrors? If you havent you should definately pick it up cause you gain a lot of respect for him after reading it.
#12
Quote by mjmiller11
Well I need some help with articulation and it seems to me that his articulation would be the best to learn from. How would I approach this? An also have you read Jimi Biography A Room Full Of Mirrors? If you havent you should definately pick it up cause you gain a lot of respect for him after reading it.



The thing about articulation is that it is pretty much unique to every individual. While you can learn some tips and tricks about articulation from Hendrix, you have to remember to incorporate it into your style and make it your own.

Hendrix used all sorts of techniques to achieve his vibrato, for example. Sometimes he would gently shake his guitar, other times (and there are documented examples of this) he would shake his guitar so hard that he would literally wrench the neck off of the body. He actually tore the neck from the screws holding it down into the body. Sometimes he would hold a chord or a note and just tap his finger nails and the back of the headstock. He was capable of the most subtle nuances and ALL of it somehow added to his sound.

He practically controlled all of his tone either from his guitar, or from the pedals at his feet. He used his entire right hand to get the articulation he wanted out of his notes. Even when he used a pick, his right hand would still brush against the strings, sometimes to mute or dampen or just to choke the note in a certain way. He also used his right hand without a pick quite often. Many times he could replace a pick with his thumb and play just as fast and just as accurately. The song Hear my Train a Comin' (acoustic version), for example, is played almost entirely with his thumb. The rhythm part of All Along the Watchtower, he uses his thumb to strum the chords gently.

All of these different techniques were his way of getting his "words" to come out the way he wanted them to. The best way of learning these kinds of things is by watching as many of the Hendrix videos and DVDs as you can. Watch his hands as he plays, every movement he makes is meaningful. Read as much as you can. Just don't forget to make his techniques your own and use them in your own way.

As for that biography of his, I never read Roomful of Mirrors, but I did read Hendrix: Setting the Record Straight. Haha, the author of Hendrix did not have a very good opinion of books like Roomful of Mirrors.
There may be times when it is impossible to prevent injustice, but there should never be a time when we fail to protest it.


Take a trip down the Scenic River


Call me Charlie.