#1
Going back to the basics and learning the chords, and some questions came to me...

1.) Why are chords so important? I know why scales are, to solo ect, but do we simply put chords in a song, without having to altering them like we do with scales?

2.) I was looking at a guitar chart with all the chords on and I saw one called Bm. But, there are others called Bm6, I know 3 at the end of a chord is a power chord, but what are the different between 6, 7 ect?

3.) Should I both to learn ALL the chords? http://www.chordie.com/chords.php

Thanks
#2
1) Chords form the backdrop to most of the music in the west for the past 600 odd years. A solo without chords backing it would sound boring

2) Bm6 is B minor with an added major 6th. It looks like this
e|---2---|
B|---3---|
G|---1---|
D|---0---|
A|---2---|
And a 3 at the end of a chord isn't a power chord. A power chord has a 5 at the end. The numbers at the end of chords indicate degrees of the scale away from the root note. For example a power chord is the root and the fifth so it has a 5 at the end. A Bmaj7 is a B major chord with an added major 7th and a B7 chord is a B major chord with an added minor 7th
Bmaj7
e|---2---|
B|---0---|
G|---3---|
D|---1---|
A|---2---|
B7
e|---2---|
B|---0---|
G|---2---|
D|---1---|
A|---2---|


3) You should learn how to form chords. Look up some of the lessons on this site

These lessons are helpful -> http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=The+Crusade&w=columns (Ignore what he says about modes. If you want to know about those read this -> https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1042392 )
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Last edited by Nietsche at Aug 2, 2009,
#3
Learn chord construction and the notes on the fretboard. That way you can figure out each chord without memorizing charts. The Crusade articles on this site is a good start.
Last edited by Guitar Guy21 at Aug 2, 2009,
#4
Quote by Power Metal Kid

2.)I know 3 at the end of a chord is a power chord.


Not sure what you mean but Root + Fifth = power chord. Root + Third + Fifth = Minor/Major chord.

I think it's great to know your chords, although I don't, because I'm lazy.

And when you are soloing/improvising with chord notes you will sound great.
Quote by EndTheRapture51

some dodgy girl tried to get off with me, I ran through the mosh pit to get away, she followed and got punched in the face
#7
Cause music is all about the intervals and relationships between notes... how they feel together, etc. Chords are just all the hundreds of combinations you could come up with on your own, just with names.
#8
Quote by Guitar Guy21
That's just a major chord.

I think he meant making the third a major or a minor interval.

Not sure what you mean but Root + Fifth = power chord

Yeah because the Bm6 has the root (B) and the fifth (F#) in it still.
Last edited by mick13 at Aug 2, 2009,
#9
Quote by mick13

Yeah because the Bm6 has the root (B) and the fifth (F#) in it still.


And a Third, I have no idea what you wanted to say with that.
Quote by EndTheRapture51

some dodgy girl tried to get off with me, I ran through the mosh pit to get away, she followed and got punched in the face
#10
Quote by Reedd
And a Third, I have no idea what you wanted to say with that.

Because the original poster was mentioning power chords with the Bm6 and I was just pointing that out, even though it may not be the type of power chord he's thinking about, there is a B and an F# still in it.
Last edited by mick13 at Aug 2, 2009,
#11
Quote by Power Metal Kid
1.) Why are chords so important? I know why scales are, to solo ect, but do we simply put chords in a song, without having to altering them like we do with scales?
Chords evolved from counterpoint. Originally, counterpoint was a means of allowing more than one instrument to play a melody, as before that only one instrument would play and the others would either play something rhythmic or drone a single note. So now people would have 2 or more melodies playing at once. As people began experimenting with what notes work well with each other harmonically (meaning played at the same time) and what doesn't, patterns were found and chords were theorised.
Since most of the voices in early music would have a very similar rhythm, it would seem to a modern musician that this music was just one chord after another. After a while, the primary melody began to have more rhythmic freedom from all the counter-melodies and as such, music began to look like it does today: melody over a chord progression.
After a while, some composers would simply copy the accompaniment (all the counter-melodies) and write a new main melody. Slowly, in modern music, the ideas of counterpoint began to degrade but the ideas of chords remained. In effect, people began to write music without counterpoint but with chords.

In modern music, it's not necessary to have a chord progression or even an accompaniment, but generally, most music will have them. Most classical teachers who teach composition will say a chord progression is essential, even for a single lined melody, as this melody will vaguely outline the chord progression.

I think I'll skip question 2, since it's already been answered.
Quote by Power Metal Kid
3.) Should I both to learn ALL the chords?
No.

It's highly doubtful that a contemporary guitarist will need extended chords (these are the chords past minor and major chords), since not much contemporary music uses extended chords. It's even more doubtful that a contemporary composer actually knows how to use these extended chords (past spamming an extended chord for the sake of writing "original" music).
But if you plan on becoming a jazz guitar, I suggest you learn at least 2 voicings of simple chords and 1 voicing of each complex chords. At the very least.
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