#1
OK, so I am pretty new to acoustic guitars and I have some questions. I just broke the D string on a fairly new acoustic, maybe 2/3 weeks old. I felt along the bridge (little white thing the strings run over, dunno if its called the bridge) and there was a little groove which I'm guessing the string got snagged on. Should I be pissed that there is already shoddy workmanship on this new guitar? Maybe I pressed hard and it created it? but not likely. Also, I'll be away for a week and a half and the guitar tech was not in today. Would it be bad for the neck, in terms of tension, to not have one string there?
#2
just put the string on urself its easy and it has a groove cus the string sits in that groove
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#3
ok good point. I currently don't have any strings, so my question of leaving it off for a week and a half still stands. anyone?
#4
So your saying that there was a groove that the string was sitting in? If that's what your saying than that's normal. The white piece is actually called the "saddle" and they are designed to he soft enough to have a groove dug into them, the groove keeps them aligned and in tune. Where are your strings breaking? On the headstock, or at the bridge? Also, Having one string missing shouldn't hurt the neck.
#6


Relax man, the groove is supposed to be there. At least, if it's what I think it is, it should be there. The white things are simply called pegs, which are set in the bridge.

If I read correctly, you need a guitar tech to change strings? If that's the case, I highly, highly recommend learning to change strings yourself. It's super easy, and you can do it in minutes.

I don't think leaving the string off would much damage the neck -- if at all. When I break strings, I leave 'em off for a while, and I don't notice any damage.
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#8
Ok thanks a lot guys. Actually what worries me is that the string broke at the saddle where it meets the little groove guy. Maybe the heavy strumming caused it to start cutting into the string? And I also know how to change strings (albeit acoustics with the pegs are a little different) but I have played electric for 5 years so I know a bit.
#9
I'm no longer worried about the tension, just whether or not to get the groove checked out? Although it sounds like its not a problem. I do have to get a setup however. I think the action is a bit high. When I go in, what does a full setup entail? other than checking the truss rod and the action? also how much should it run total? Thank you!
#10
if you're really worried about the saddle cuttin into the strings sand down any rough edges.i can't see the plastic of an acoustic saddle doing that though... but if you're worried about it sandin rough edges should cancel that out
#11
ENOUGH! Everyone from the threadstarter down just stop posting now. There isn't a single correct answer in the lot of you so please just stop trying to be helpful.

TS. The piece you are concerned about is called the bridge SADDLE. It's apparently made of plastic(common on low end guitars). The metal strings are going to cut into that material, there's no getting around it. It will effect string life after a time. You can help by sanding a bit off the top to remove the groove or just have it replaced with a bone one. Bone is hard enough that the strings won't dig into it like they will on plastic. There are things called compensated saddles that will have angles cut into the to shift the string contact point either more towards the neck or back away from it. Those are not to be confused with wear grooves left behind by the strings. Those are not supposed to be there, no matter what anyone else above has already said.
And as for leaving one string off for a week, the guitar will be just fine.
You can find many tutorials online that will help you with restringing. Search youtube and google. Save a couple a bucks and learn how to do it yourself. It's easy and every guitar player needs to learn how.
#12
Quote by LeftyDave
There are things called compensated saddles that will have angles cut into the to shift the string contact point either more towards the neck or back away from it. Those are not to be confused with wear grooves left behind by the strings. Those are not supposed to be there, no matter what anyone else above has already said.


Clarification for newer players: He means the wear groves are not supposed to be there. The angle adjustment on a saddle is supposed to be there. Some low end instruments don't have the compensation, just a straight saddle.
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