#1
I'm a n00b forgive me.

but how do I play this chord on the guitar?

F# major = F# A# C#
F# min = flat the thrid= F# A C#
F# min7 = flat the 7th = F# A C# (E#)b

F# min7 sus4 = drop the 3rd add in a perfect 4 = F# B C# E?

Is that right?

Help? TY
#2
sounds right to me.
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#3
Wouldn't the 7th be E, E# would be a Major Seventh interval

Otherwise yea I think you're on the right track
#4
No, that's not F#m7sus4. You'd probably see that written as F#7sus4. If not, F#11 without a third. The 7 implies that the 7th is minor. If it is m7, that implies a minor third (A), which you do not have in that.

Remember, suspended = suspended M/m 3rd. It can't be a minor sus. F#m7sus4 is actually just F#m11.


edit: +1 voodoochild. The E# is the Major7. It'd just be E for the 7th.

2nd edit: The most simple and easiest way to play the chord you are intending (F#7sus4) is like this: 222xxx. It has the 1st, 4th, and b7th. It may not give you the sound you intend, but that is the simplest way.
Last edited by hunterman at Aug 2, 2009,
#5
Looks correct to me. If you're looking for a fingering here's one:
e--0
B--2
G--4
D--4
A--x
E--x
#6
F#m7sus4 is most easily played like this:

e|--2-----
b|--2-----
g|--4-----
d|--2-----
a|--4-----
E|--2-----

or like this:

e|--9----
b|--12---
g|--9----
d|--11---
a|--9----
E|-------

both contain the root (F#), fifth (c#), minor seventh (E), and the fourth (B). the third is typically not played in a sus4 chord, since it would remove emphasis from the 4th
#7
The notes are right, but the name isn't totally. It would be written as F#7sus4 instead. As far as fingering goes, frigginjerk gives the best choices, IMO.
#8
If such a thing as F#7sus4 or F#m7sus4 existed, that's what it would look like. Friggin jerk's voicing is how I would voice such a chord (if it existed), so +1 you jerk.

Generally it's best to name a chord as if it's a triad, even if it means using an inversion. Although F# B C# E looks like the root note is an F#, I'd rather say that chord is a C#m7(11)/F# or something. This means the chord is now a triad, instead of some strange chord that has no minor or major quality.
So in my opinion, X7sus4 chords don't exist, or shouldn't exist.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#9
Quote by demonofthenight

So in my opinion, X7sus4 chords don't exist, or shouldn't exist.


So that also means you think Xsus4 shouldn't exist...
#10
Quote by deHufter
So that also means you think Xsus4 shouldn't exist...

Xsus4 chords cannot be described as a triad, it is impossible. Therefore, the only option is to name it as an Xsus4 chord.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#12
Suspended chords can't be minor or major... as the suspension is always replacing the third, whether they are ii chords or V chords. Based on your key, you will know where it fits in and will know whether its a major or minor once the suspension is gone. Sus4 resolves best to the major chord than the minor chord.
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#13
Demonofthenight, I don't agree that you can't have X7sus4 chords. All sus4 chords tend to resolve down a fifth, and surely if the chord in question resolves to be B as this one would you'd prefer a chord built on F#, as the dominant. Slash chords are preferable in some cases, but I think naming all X7sus4 chords as slash chords would just be confusing especially if you came across one on a chord chart when improvising.

Although obviously I think it should be named F#7sus4, rather than F#m7sus4.
#14
I didn't think you could get minor with sus but even if you named the chord wrong, it doesnt matter you are playing it right
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#16
You can't have a m7sus4 chord.

Such a chord would likely be an m7add11 chord.

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#18
Thanks. I being playing the cord as F#m7, and it sounds fine. But I figure I wanted to hear to what the writer had in mind.


If your interested the song is here: http://www.sovereigngracestore.com/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=M4055-02-55

It's basically E -> F#m7sus4 - >F#m7->D

During the F#m7sus4 there is an E, A, F# notes in the melody.

F# B C# E with an A in there is essentially the notes heard. It kind of fits.
#19
"A suspended chord ('sus chord) is a chord in which the third is omitted, usually with either a perfect fourth ( play (help·info)) or a major second ( play (help·info)) added, although the fourth is far more common. The lack of a minor or a major third in the chord creates an open sound, which can suggest a minor or a major tonality."
-wiki

so yes, minor chords can be suspended. minor sus chords "exist". What you label it, is a matter of context.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 3, 2009,
#20
Quote by quinny1089
In that instant, the minor part of the chord name indicates that it's functioning as a minor seventh chord rather than a dominant.

F#7sus4 wouldn't be wrong. Its just the F#m7sus4 tells you more information about the chord.

Just my opinion, but its not wrong.

The chord is what it is. It has no major or minor 3rd, therefore it is not a minor chord. The chord name m7sus4 is an oxymoron.

The other chords in the progression may suggest the chords quality though.

Anyway... not to argue too much about nothing!
#21
^ you could sus a m7 chord. It's a matter of context what you label it. (and nomenclature)

F#7sus4 = F# dominant7th chord with a sus4 (in some books they will label it F#sus)

F#m7sus4 = F#m7 chord with a sus4

* same notes & sound.... different context/function.


Compare these progression..

D | Am7sus4 - Am7 | C | Gsus4 - G :|


Em7 |A7sus4 - A7| D


Same notes in those chords, but clearly a different context.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 3, 2009,
#22
I have to say I disagree with that idea of context. 7sus4 chords tend to resolve down a fifth... m7 chords do not. By looking at the chord function it seems that 7sus4 is the obvious choice of name. Doesn't matter if the preceeding chord was a m7 chord or not as the 7sus4 chord changes the context as it changes the key.
#23
Quote by frigginjerk
F#m7sus4 is most easily played like this:

e|--2-----
b|--2-----
g|--4-----
d|--2-----
a|--4-----
E|--2-----

or like this:

e|--9----
b|--12---
g|--9----
d|--11---
a|--9----
E|-------

both contain the root (F#), fifth (c#), minor seventh (E), and the fourth (B). the third is typically not played in a sus4 chord, since it would remove emphasis from the 4th



this seems right to me.
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#24
Quote by Sam_Vimes
I have to say I disagree with that idea of context. 7sus4 chords tend to resolve down a fifth... m7 chords do not. By looking at the chord function it seems that 7sus4 is the obvious choice of name. Doesn't matter if the preceeding chord was a m7 chord or not as the 7sus4 chord changes the context as it changes the key.


I disagree. Based on the chord function I would say that m7sus4 is the obvious choice of name. (In my 1st example)

bottom line: it's common knowledge that a sus chord could imply Major OR minor tonality.

What you call it is a matter of context (and sometimes nomenclature)

more on sus chords...
"The name suspended derives from an early voice leading technique developed during the common practice period of composition, in which an anticipated stepwise melodic progression to a harmonically stable note in any particular part (voice) was often momentarily delayed or suspended simply by extending the duration of the previous note. The resulting unexpected dissonance could then be all the more satisfyingly resolved by the eventual appearance of the displaced note."

That displaced note can be the minor 3rd as well as the Major 3rd.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 3, 2009,
#25
Okay, disagree then... I was just putting forward an opinion I felt could be useful to others.

I'm not sure about your common knowledge, but I'll quote my sources:
'A good definition of a sus chord is "a V chord in which the 4th doesn't sound like an 'avoid' note."... sus chords function as V chords.'
-The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine, pages 43-45

He advises the playing of mixolydian scales over all such chords.
Last edited by Sam_Vimes at Aug 3, 2009,
#26
Just my opinion...I really don't think it matters.

If I saw Fm7sus4 I would suspend a 4th in place of the minor third.
If I saw F7sus4 I would suspend a 4th in place of the major third.

Either way it would be mission accomplished.
Si
#27
Quote by 20Tigers
Just my opinion...I really don't think it matters.

If I saw Fm7sus4 I would suspend a 4th in place of the minor third.
If I saw F7sus4 I would suspend a 4th in place of the major third.

Either way it would be mission accomplished.


Well said, I totally agree
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 3, 2009,
#28
I don't really think Fm7sus4 makes much sense at all, but nobody's going to misunderstand, so there's really no problem