#1
Quite simply I'm looking to get a brighter tone. I'm trying to get a strat-ish sound, but I don't have a spare thousand sitting around for a strat. Right now I'm running an epiphone g-400 into a peavey valveking112. Any suggestions that could help are appreciated(new pickups, pedals, etc.)

Oh and as for sound, something like the arctic monkeys, or the vines.
#3
I was thinking about that, how much would it cost to have that done, or how hard would it be to do myself?
#4
replace the pickups - the G-400 has a very dark bassy tone because of the stock pickups. actually, removing the covers might help a small amount if you don't mind changing the way your guitar looks. But i would advise replacing the pickups for some brighter sounding humbuckers, or maybe even some humbucker-sized P90s if you're looking for a more single coily tone.

i wouldn't really recommend coil splitting (often wrongly called coil tapping) unless you specifically want to be able to switch between single coil and humbucker tones as it's more or less 50:50 as to whether it'll sound good or not dependant entirely on the pickups you use and whether the coil split tone from those pickups matches your guitars natural tone and so on... and you'll need to replace the pickups to do this anyway

isn't the peavey valveking quite a dark sounding amp also?
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#5
Quote by Blompcube
i wouldn't really recommend coil splitting (often wrongly called coil tapping)

Coil tapping is using a coil of the humbucker, and splitting is lowering the output, no?
...
#6
new strings would actually be a step in the right direction. d'add round wounds are fairly bright
The world doesn't revolve around you. If it does, beware. You're probably about to pass out drunk.

The 19 year old who knows his stuff. Most of the time.
#7
Quote by Ghold125
Coil tapping is using a coil of the humbucker, and splitting is lowering the output, no?

i always thought tapping was lowering the output, splitting is using one coil from a humbucker (as you are separating [splitting] the paired coils electronically). though if you look at it in different ways... it could make some sense if you interchanged the terms for either setup which is probably why people interchange them so often
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#9
Well I already took off the covers a while ago and I'm usingd'addario prosteels/nickel rounds. So I need to know which would be more expensive: coil split/tap(whichever you wanna say) or replacing the pickups.
#11
I was going to recommend the Knockout, but ultimately, the pickups could maybe do with being changed. If I was TS, I would get some Seymour Duncan H-90s in that bad boy.
#13
Coil splitting is worth a try. The cost of a switch is like nothing, and if you do't like the tone, then you could change the pickups. It'll be easy to do as long as you have 4 conductor humbuckers. Some people recommend a parallel wiring for the two coils instead.

Oh, and for the record, coil tapping is done with single coils and is where a portion of the coil is removed from the circuit, so that you have fewer turns of wire. Used commonly with high out put single coils.

Oh and the post above me is right on. If you want a strat tone for good, then
I'd say sell your guitar and buy a strat.
Last edited by supergerbil at Aug 3, 2009,
#14
What about just replacing the humbucker and then coil splitting the new ones? I don't want to give up a humbucker tone.
#15
You cannot just get a strat like tone out of an SG style guitar, sorry but it just does not work. Coil splitting sounds terrible 90% of the time and the resulting tone is nothing like that of a true strat single coil, nor will the guitar itself ever have that brightness and bell like chime of a strat.